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Looking for a Start 

Gary Swim, the highly 
touted transfer from Snow 
Community College in Utah, 
will be K-State's No. 1 quar- 
terback this secson. See 
Page 13. 



Cloudy 



Cloudy and continued cool with 
rain and thunderstorms likely 
today with locally heavy rains 
possible, high in low 70s. Wind 
east to southeast 10 to 20 mph. 



- 

i - h £ S t ..... 



-■r. 



Merit SviWivii 



Last year, 17 National Merit Scholars were enrolled 
at K-State. This year, 34 have either enrolled at K- 
State or indicated they will do so. See Page 3. 



Monday 

August 24, 1987 



Kansas State University 

Manhattan. Kansas 66506 

Volume 94. Number 1 



Kansas State 



Collegian 



Bands kick off 






By Becky Howard 

Arts and Entertainment Editor 

Although Memorial Stadium held 
a crowd smaller than in years before, 
it still vibrated with the rock sounds 
of The Dial Tones and The Elvis 
Brothers at the 7th annual Welcome 
Back Concert Sunday afternoon. 

A cool, partly cloudy afternoon 
had a mellow crowd of about 600 
scattered on blankets watching the 
show or playing Frisbee and Hacky 
Sack at the free concert, which was 
co-sponsored by the Union Program 
Council and KQLA-FM radio. 

Mike Penner, UPC program advis- 
er in charge of the concert, said he 
was disappointed with the smaller 
crowd (last year's concert drew 
about 1.500 people), but he said he 
thought it "did not make it an unsuc- 
cessful event." 

"There could be a couple of factors 
involved with the lower turnout," 
Penner said. "It was cloudy earlier in 
the afternoon, which may have 
deterred some people. Also, the 
bands that played were not as well- 
known as other bands we have had in 
ihe past." 

Dale Uhlenhop, junior in electrical 
engineering, said the concert needed 
"more rock." 

'This year's concert music was 
too slow, but I think as a whole these 
concerts are a great way to get out 
and meet people and relax before the 
first day of classes." he said. 

Bill Graff, senior in agricultural 
economics, said, "I am familiar with 
the bands, so this concert is enjoyable 
for me. But a lot of people aren't 
familiar with the bands or their mus- 
ic. Still, the concert gives people a 
chance to gel out and relax. If they 
don't like the music, they can play 
Frisbee or Hacky Sack." 

The concert started with The Dial 
Tones, a four-member band from St 
Joseph, Mo., who also opened last 
year's concert. Gary McKnight, lead 
singer and bass guitarist for the 
group, said the band enjoyed playing 
at Memorial Stadium because of its 
echo. 

"We like playing here because the 
stadium has its own built-in reverb." 
he said. 

McKnight described ihe band's 
style of music as "power pop" with 
"an Everly Brothers kind of 
harmony." 

"We are most influenced by a 
1970s band called Bad Finger," he 
■ See CONCERT, Page 12 




Wefald assigns 
provost duties 



By Deron Johnson 
Editor 

James R. Coffman, acting Uni- 
versity provost since July 1, was 
appointed provost Friday by Pres- 
ident Jon Wefald. Coffman 
replaces Owen Kocppc, who 
stepped down to return to 
teaching. 

The provost is the academic 
head of the University and is 
responsible for the deans and 
colleges. 

"My immediate reaction is that 
it's a humbling experience," said 



Coffman, who served as dean of 
the College of Veterinary Medi- 
cine until he took ov« M acting 
provost. "I view it as a real oppor- 
tunity and challenge." 

Wefald said Coffman's associ- 
ation with the University will 
enhance his effectiveness. 

"He has the intelligence, 
analytical skills and ability to Its 
ten that will make him an out- 
standing provost," Wefald said. 
"Jim Coffman has the potential to 
become one of die best provosts in 
the history of Kansas Slate 

■ See PROVOST, Page 3 



Police to examine 
wing flap controls 



Bob Bessert, freshman in veterinary medicine, high-lights text during the Welc 
explores the area Sunday afternoon in Memorial Stadium. Between 500 and 600 



icstftock cone* 
people attended 



Stafr/Chris Assj 

rt while a dog 
the free event. 



By The Associated Press 

DETROIT — Federal investiga- 
tors hope the discovery of devices 
that controlled the wing flaps on 
Northwest Flight 255 will reveal 
clues to the cause of the crash which 
killed at least 156 people. 

Families consider suits/ 
Page 5 

Meanwhile, a memorial service 
was held Sunday at the Roman 
Catholic Cathedral of St. Paul, and 
Arizona Gov. Evan Mccham dec- 
lared Sunday a day of mourning in 
his state. Flight 255 was headed for 
Phoenix when it crashed. 

National Transportation Safety 
Board officials said a flap control 
lever and a drive mechanism that 
moved the plane's wing flaps were 
found Saturday and might reveal 
how the flaps were set tcforc the 
plane crashed Aug. 16 on takeoff 
from Detroit Metropolitan Airport. 

"We can't confirm the lever was in 
any certain position (before the 
crash) without studying it in a con- 
trolled environment," said Jack 
Drake, a spokesman for the NTSB. 

The drive mechanism — an electr- 
ic motor and a screw jack that were 
located inside the plane's wing — 
were heavily damaged, Drake said. 

"It was broken to the extent that 
we don't expect it to tell us much," 
Drake said. 



But The Detroit Free Press 
reported Sunday that an investigator 
tor the Federal Aviation Admiftistra 
tion who asked not to be identified 
said the drive mechanism indicated 
that the plane's flaps and sla<s wen; 
retracted during takeoff . a setting 
experts say could cause a crash 

The slats on the front edge ol a 
wing and flaps on the back edge are 
extended to produce additional lilt at 
low airspeeds during takeoffs and 
landings. 

The crash, the nation's sccond- 
worsl air disaster, killed a 11 but one ol 
the 155 people on board and at least 
two people on die ground. 

The lone survivor. 4-year-old 
Cecilia Cichan of Tcmpe, An/. 
remained in serious condition Sun- 
day in the University of Michigan 
Medical Center's burn unit, said 
spokesman John Turck. 

"She is becoming increasingly 
more alert," he said. 

Cecilia's mother, father and 
brother died in the crash. Rescuers 
said her mother may have shielded 
Cecilia with her body. 

In Detroit, about 100 worshippers 
gathered at the church for an inter* 
faith service conducted by about 15 
clergymen to remember the victims 
and honor rescue workers and others 
who assisted at the trash 

Wayne County PKBCCUtor John 
O'Hair compared the response from 

■ See PLANE, Page 12 



Collegian changes 
in numerous ways 



Change, it has been said, is 
inevitable. 

And anyone famUiar with the 
Kansas State Collegian will 
undoubtedly notice a big change 
with this issue. Although the most 
obvious difference is cosmetic, 
technical and formal changes 
have occurred as well. 

The words yoi see were printed 
by a small table-top laser printer 
that has taken the place of the two 
cumbersome, less-ihan -lightning- 
fast machines previously used. 
The change brings the Collegian 
more in line with current techno- 
logical advances and will greatly 
improve our efficiency. 

Since the new primer required 
that we change our headline style, 
it seemed a logical time to update 
our flag, which had become 
slightly dated. New page flags 
appear as well, and other design 
changes will debut as the semester 
progresses. 

In addition to the facelift, ihe 



Collegian will offer several new 
features this fall. The first appears 
today as "SportsMonday," a two- 
page feature that will run each 
Monday and offer a comprehen- 
sive weekend sports wrap-up. 

Each Tuesday, "BusinessTues- 
day" will provide a local look at 
the retail and business climate as 
well as examine how national 
de velopmcnts affect the local eco- 
nomy. A business page seemed 
natural considering the significant 
growth and change occurring in 
Manhattan. 

Although there may seem to be 
an inordinate number of changes 
this fall, by no means is the Colle- 
gian being overhauled. The 
changes are designed to make our 
coverage more complete and 
upgrade what we believe to be 
already a fine product. 

We hope the changes meet with 
your approval. 

Deron Johnson 
Editor 



landfill 



By Judy Lundstrom 

Speclol Projects Editor 

Thirty-four months and counting. 

That's how much time Riley 
County commissioners have to shut 
down the Riley County Landfill and 
institute a new form of waste dispos- 
al, according to an administrative 
order from the Kansas Department 
of Health and Environment, 



Analysis 



The order, filed July 17 by KDUE 
Secretary Stanley C. Grant, was 
issued after water tests from two pri- 
vate wells east of the landfill reve- 
aled contamination by cancer- 
causing compounds. 

The first contamination was 
delected in November 1985 on the 
property of Charlene Sweet, a land- 
fill employee who owns a home 
adjacent to ihe landfill in Mochlman 
Bottoms, The second was discovered 
in November 1986 on the property of 
John Pratt Jr., 1 ,000 feet southeast of 
ihe landfill. 

After learning of Ihe problem. 
Mochlman Bottoms residents 



banded together and petitioned the 
county for a water district to be 
installed to provide them with city 
waier. Commissioners approved the 
district April 27. 

But residents still weren't satis- 
fied. Twelve families hired a Junc- 
tion City law firm and threatened a 
suit if closure action was not taken 
by July 20. 

The KDHE order came throe days 
before the deadline, mandating the 
land fill closure be completed by July 
1, 1990. The closure was ordered 
because water testing indicated 
"beyond a reasonable doubt that con- 
taminated groundwater from the 
Riley County Landfill has migrated 
beyond the boundaries of the landfill 
and has contaminated groundwa- 
ter. ..." according to the administra- 
tive order. 

One of the major deadlines man- 
dated hy the order is Dec. 31. when 
the water district must be completed. 

Bids for installation of the system 
will be opened by Riley County 
Commissioners Aug. 27. The sys- 
tem will probably be installed by the 
end of October, said County Engi- 
neer Dan Harden. 



Currently, several residents arc 
hauling water from Manhattan, 
Sweet said. The county purchased 
several 5-gallon water coolers in 
July for those residents, and it is pay- 



ing them S20 a month to haul the 
water, she said. 

Dec. 31 is also the deadline lor 
county commissioners to submit a 

■ See LANDFILL, Page 1 1 



Muvhlrrun Bwilums 




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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN. Monday, A ugmt 24, 1M7 



Briefly 



Mines found on PLO yacht 

VALLETTA, Malta — Soldiers in Valletta harbor removed 
two limpet mines from the hull of a yacht belonging to the 
Palestine Liberation Orpnization, authorities reported Sunday. 

The officials, who insisted on anonymity, said the mines 
were removed Friday and that six crewmen of the vessel, 
which was named Angel, were questioned by police. 

The mines were discovered after a crane hoisted the vessel 
out of the water for repairs. The yacht had been berthed in the 
harbor since May. 

No one answered the telephone at the PLO office in Malta 
when called for comment on Sunday. 

Limpet mines are designed to be fastened onto a variety of 
surfaces. 

Spanish Guard accepts women 

MADRID, Spain — Spanish women will be allowed to join 
the Civil Guard for the first lime since the paramilitary police 
force was founded more than a century ago, its director said in 
an interview published Sunday. 

The Madrid daily El Pais quoted director Luis Roldan as 
saying 150 women would join the 60,000-member Civil Guard 
next February or March. 

Roldan said the women would work in special information, 
fiscal and administrative units as part of a program to moder- 
nize the police force. 

The Civil Guard was founded in 1844 during the reign of 
Queen Isabel II to patrol the countryside and keep bandits and 
ami -royalist factions at bay. 

It still patrols rural areas but also serves as a national high- 
way police, has special anti-terrorist units and guards govern- 
ment buildings and foreign embassies. 

Indian water minister resigns 

NEW DELHI. India — The government aidiuunccd Sunday 
the rcsipation of the water minister, and newspapers reported 
that he would lead an investigation into India's arms kkkback 
scandal. 

The announcement said only that the resignation of B. 
Shankaraitand, water minister since September 1985, had been 
accepted by President Ramaswamy Venkataraman. 

But the Indian Express and Sunday Observer newspapers said 
Shankaranand was to lead a committee that will probe alleged 
kickbacks in the purchase of artillery for India's military from 
Sweden's Bofors company. 

Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi announced an investigation after 
it was made public in Sweden that a $38 million commission 
was paid on the $1.4 billion deal. Gandhi has denied any 
wrongdoing. 

Bride dies hours after wedding 

DEPEW, N.Y, — A bride was killed less than eight hours 
after her wedding when the car she was riding in was broad- 
sided by another vehicle that ran a red light, police said. 

Gaylc Rzcznik, 31, of Depew, was reluming from her wed- 
ding reception early Saturday with her new husband, Alan, 35, 
when a car sped through a red light and struck their auto on 
the passenger side, said Officer Richard Zolnowski. 

John A. Radlbcck, 26, ot Chccktowaga, was charged with 
driving while intoxicated and passing through a red light, Zol- 
nowski said. 



KC man new Hispanic leader 

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Kansas City businessman Hector 
Barreto was named chairman of the board of the U.S. Hispanic 
Chamber of Commerce at the group's annual board meeting. 

Barreto, who has served as the chamber's president for the 
past eight years, was appointed to the new post Saturday. 

The 14-membcr board, which met at the chamber's Kansas 
City headquarters, also elected Abel Quintcla, of Odessa, Texas, 
to succeed Barreto as president. 

Barreto. who owns a construction and ceramic tile distributing 
firm, was one of the founding members of the chamber. The 
organization promotes Hispanic businesses across the country. 

Poll shows people like Pope 

LOS ANGELES — Most Americans think highly of Pope 
John Paul II but disagree sharply with many of his beliefs and 
those of the Roman Catholic Church, according to a Los 
Angeles Times poll released Sunday. 

The survey of 2,040 adults, including 957 Catholics, found 
that while Americans express admiration for the pope, a majori- 
ty disagree with his church's position on such subjects as birth 
control, artificial insemination and women in the priesthood. 

The newspaper said the telephone survey, conducted Aug. 
16-19, has a 4 percent margin of error. 

Of the Catholics polled, 75 percent said they admire John 
Paul, who will visit the United States next month. Among 
Catholics 40 or older, the pope is well thought of by 89 
. percent. 

More than half of the Protestants interviewed said they like 
the pope and only 8 percent expressed dislike for him. 



e looks for FDR look-alike 



Campus Bulletin 



AISNOl'NCKMEVIS 



CAM PL'S ORGANIZATIONS are 

en could gcd to uic Cunpu* Bulletin, All 
announcements must be lubmiltctl by 1 1 i.m. 
1 he day before publication Announcement 
lor Mnruby'i bulletin DIM he in by It am 
Friday. Information forms sic available at Ik 
tabic outside Kcd/.ie 103. 1-orms should be left 
in the mailbo* at the table aflei being tilled 
out All Mtanittkai must be signed and arc 
subject lo verification 

TODAV 
LITTLE SISTKKS OF THK PEARLS 

\ \I>K l MKS will ii.ci-l .111)1. :9p.m .11 I inn 

House inanity 



MOK1ARi)OARl)mccisat9p.m mJus 
mi Hall lobby. 



TUESDAY 

KLGI1Y CLL'B meets at 7 45 p.m. in 

I'mon 20o 

STUDENTS AGAINST DRIVING 
DKl'Nk mod ai h p.m. in Union 206. 

SHP CABINET meets at 'J p.m. in the SO A 
office. 

ALPHA CHI SIGMA meets al 7 p.m in 
WiIIjiJ 218. 



1 PUTT-PUTT 

forthefunofit 

across from Wal-Mart 



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TIMBERLINE LODGE. Ore. — A 50-year-old ski lodge, 
built during the Depression, is holding a look-alike contest. 

The lodge is looking for a twin of Franklin Delano Roosevelt 
for a ceremony next month celebrating its golden anniversary. 

The winner will help re-enact the dedication of the lodge on 
Mount Hood, which the late president presented to the nation 
in 1937 as a major achievement of his Works Progress 
Administration. 

The look-alike also will play FDR in a motorcade through 
Portland on Sept. 25. The winner will receive a weekend for 
two — his companion need not be named Eleanor — at Tim- 
berline Lodge, along with dinner and ski lift tickets. 

Timberlinc says the qualified applicant must be: an inspira- 
tional speaker with an identifiable Eastern accent, older than 21, 
ideally about 55. comfortable using a pince-nez and a long 
cigarette holder. 

Elderly women to celebrate 

ONALASKA. Wis. — Leilah Halverson. a resident at the 
Onalaska Care Center, is looking forward to celebrating her 
92nd birthday next week. And among the invited guests is her 
first baby sitter, Liltie Severson. She's 105. 

Today, the two women arc confined to wheelchairs, but 
Severson recalls that the infant Leilah was easy to care for, 

"She was a good baby," she said recently, recalling how the 
Halverson family asked her to baby-sit. 

Later, both women sport many decades caring for their own 
homes. Halverson had three boys, while Severson became the 
mother of 16 children. 



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Provost 




Staff/Steve Wolgiil 

James R. CofTman was appointed acting University provost Friday. Before his appoint- 
ment, Coffman served as dean of the College or Veterinary Medicine, a professor and 
department head. 



■ CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 

University." 

Coffman said his first priority is to 
emphasize the strategic planning ini- 
tiated by the University within the past 
year. 

"We have to intensify and upscale 
substantially the planning process," he 
said. 

Coffman said he will consider 
beginning the planning process in the 
fall instead of in the spring, as it is cur- 
rently. He also wants to include subse- 
quent years to make the plan more 
continuous. 

'The excellence of the deans, olher 
administration leaders and faculty 
leadership ensures we'll be able to hit 
the ground running from the start," he 
said. 

Coffman was named acting provost 
after the four finalists from a national 
search dropped out of contention. 
Wcfald considered initiating a second 
national search, but he said it might 
have seemed "rigged" to outside appl- 
icants because Coffman had so much 
internal support. 

"Most people came to the conclu- 
sion (that another national search) 
could be counterproductive," Wefald 
said. "Usually the rule of thumb is you 
have to bring someone in from the out- 
side because no one on the inside has 
thai kind of support" 

CofTman at a glance 
Degrees 

■ Master's Degree in Clinical Pathol- 
ogy from K-Slate, 1969 

■ Doctor of Veterinary Medicine 
from K-State, 1962 

■ Bachelor's Degree from K-State, 
1960 

K-State Experience 

■ July 1984 to July 1987: Dean of the 
College of Veterinary Medicine 

■ August 1981 toJune 1984: Head of 
Department of Surgery and Medicine 

■ 1965-69: Instructor, Equine Clinics 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Monday, Augutt 24, 1987 

Recruitment, funding 
attract Merit scholars 
from Kansas schools 



By Becky Lucas 

Managing Editor 



The number of the "best and brightest" stu- 
dents is on the rise at K-State, Thirty-Tour 
National Merit Scholars have either enrolled 
at K-State or have indicated they will do so, 
said Larry Mocder, associate director of Stu- 
dent Financial Assistance. 

Last year 17 National Merit Scholars were 
enrolled at K-Statc. Mocder said. He attri- 
buted the increase to new recruiting tech- 
niques implemented lasi year, increased 
knowledge about K -State's programs and a 
scholarship commitment that jumped from 
S250 to 55,500. 

University of Kansas figures scheduled to 
be released today indicate that 34 National 
Merit Scholars are expected to enroll, eight 
more than in 1986. National Merit Scholars 
attending KU receive $1,300 per year. 

Pat Bosco, assistant vice president and 
dean of student life, said there are 161 
National Merit Scholars from Kansas. At 
Wichita Slate University, two National Merit 
Scholars arc expected to enroll. Fort Hays 
State University expects four, and Pittsburg 
State University expects none. 

The emphasis placed on recruiting Nation- 
al Merit Scholars stems from an attempt to 
remedy Kansas' "brain drain," when the 
state's best students leave to attend universi- 
ties elsewhere. 

'This past year President (Jon) Wcfald 
made as one of his main interests increasing 
the number of National Merit Scholars for 
this fall," said Bosco. 

'They don't necessarily represent the best 
and brightest," he said. 'There are a number 
(of others) who arc as bright that KSU 
attempts to respond to as well." 

Wcfatd approached the KSU Foundation 
to secure increased scholarship backing, Bos- 
co said. Before Wcfald's initiative, the only 
full-ride scholarships were athletic. 

"We had to remind the people of the state 
that Kansas State is a very special place," 
Wefald said, referring to the recruitment 



effort. "We were able to convey how many 
outstanding students had come and gone 
from Kansas Slate." 

He attributed the increase to a rejuvenated 
image, the new admissions representatives 
who visited all the Kansas high schools and, 
with help from the Foundation, a competitive 
scholarship package. 

National Merit Scholars are selected from 
high school students who have taken the Pre- 
liminary Scholastic Aptitude Test/ National 
Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test (PS AT/ 
NMSQT) as juniors and scored in the lop 
one-half of I percent or the graduating high 
school students in their slate. This score qual- 
ifies the student as a Naiional Merit Semi- 
Finalist. 

"This past year President 
Wefald made as one of his 
main interests increasing the 
number of National Merit Scho- 
lars for this fall." 

—Pat Bosco 



Semi-finalists compete to become Nation- 
al Merit Scholars by taking the Scholastic 
Aptitude Test (SAT), submitting academic 
records and providing endorsements and 
recommendations from their high school 
principals. 

According to a spokesperson for ihc 
National Merit Scholarship Cooperation, 
each year more than one million high school 
juniors take ihc PSAT/NMSQT. Approxi- 
mately 15,000 students qualify as scmi- 
linalisLs, and about 90 percent go on lo 
become National Merit Scholars. From this 
group of scholars, 6,000 receive National 
Merit Scholarships. The money for ihc scho- 
larships comes from 600 independent spon- 
sors and universities. 

Alter re-evaluating their scholarship prog- 
ram, Fort Hays State offered S2.200 per yen 
to National Merit Scholars. 



Regents broaden status 



By Staff and Wire Reports 

Some out-of-state residents may 
qualify for cheaper tuition rates at 
state universities as a result of regula- 
tions passed by the Kansas Board of 
Regents in mid-August. 

Stanley Koplik, Regents executive 
director, said the regulations were 
designed to implement a new law the 
Legislature passed last spring. 

Under the law, high school stu- 
dents who move otit of ihe state after 
graduation and enroll at one of the six 
state universities or Kansas Techni- 
cal Institute in Salina within 12 



months arc considered in-state resi- 
dents for payment of tuition. 

Also, people who move lo Kansas 
to take a job and then enrol I wiihin 1 2 
months of their move would be eligi- 
ble for in-state rates. 

Koplik said before the law was 
passed, a person had to be a Kansas 
resident for at least one year to meet 
Kansas residency requirements. Tui- 
tion for in-siatc students is generally 
less than half the amount for out-of- 
state residents. 

Undergraduate students at K-Slatc 
who qualify for in-state rates paid 
S665.65 for the fall semester. Out-of- 



state undergraduates paid $1,750.65 
for tuition and fees. Instate graduate 
students paid $725.65, and out-of- 
state graduate students paid 
SI, 8 10.65 for tuition this fall. 

University officials are unable to 
estimate how many people are 
affected by the new law until fall 
enrollments are completed. 

The tuition rules will stay in effect 
until Dec. 15, by which time the 
Board can make them permanent. If 
there is no filing to make them per- 
manent, the temporary rules will 
expire May 1. 



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Editorial 



Kansas State Collegian ■ Monday, August 24, 1987 ■ Page 4 



comment on story 



The ringing of the 8:05 a.m. school bells 
today awoke most of us to the reality — sum- 
mer is over. Those who spent the last three 
months working in office buildings, on their 
tans or anywhere in between might feci disor- 
ientated being in Manhattan and not knowing 
what went on this summer. 

Since most missed most of the soap operas 
this summer because of never-ending Contra 
hearings or work schedules, here is K-State's 
very own One Life of a Wildcat. 

To begin with, the show will cost more to 
be part of the family than it did last semester. 
Grandfather Legislature decided last spring 
the grandchildren should pay more of their 
own way. Besides, he said it was just too 
expensive for him when he was concentrating 



on making a family advertisement about fam- 
ous Kansas skyscrapers and vicious elk. 

The advertisements were supposed to run 
in national magazines to bring in businesses 
and tourists. While it was in production, peo- 
ple started wondering where the 60-story 
building was located since everyone thought 
the tallest building was about 30 stories 
smaller. They also wondered if the elk pic- 
tured in the ad were living in the building 
since they — like the building — don't inha- 
bit Kansas. 

Meanwhile in Manhattan, the eight Wild- 
cat children, also known as colleges, were 
ordered by Father Wefald to make up plans 
for the future for the stategic planning prog- 
ram. He was happy with most of the child- 



Commentary 




Academic year brings 
new challenges, hope 



Somehow, there's no time of the 
year quite like the end of August 
when thoughts turn from relaxation 
to academia. There's an attitude 
among nearly everyone — students 
especially — that there's nothing 
that can't be done. 

Perceptions that great things are in 
store tend to be pervasive. In Man- 
hattan this fall, all these things seem 
to be especially evident. 

And for good reason. 

The downtown area, once 
shunned by shoppers and fate, is 
coming alive amid one of the largest 
retail construction projects in the 
city's history. 

The University has doubled its 
number of National Merit Scholars 
with 34 tentatively enrolled for fall 



classes, and preliminary signs point 
to an enrollment gain that may be 
sizable. K-State*s dorms and greek 
houses have already noted marked 
increases in occupancy. 

But all this optimism must be tem- 
pered by the reality that much 
remains to be done at K-State. Fund- 
ing is still woefully insufficient in 
many areas, the best and most 
diverse faculty elude the University 
and we have a library desperately in 
need of assistance. 

But what would August be with- 
out its challenges? By channeling 
our optimism properly, there's 
nothing we can't do. 

This University is already begin- 
ning to prove that. 



CHRISTINE 
DOLL 

Editorial 
Page Editor 



rens' plans, but most of them were thwarted 
when Dad only promised a few of the child- 
ren enough allowances to cany the plans out. 

The children who were promised the most 
money were the ones interested in research 
and the scientific fields. This is partly 
because he could "sell" the cost to grand- 
father Legislature. Father Wefald got me 
notion that Grandfather would be more likely 
to fund programs that promised to generate 
money for Grandfather — who in the end 
controls how much money Dad gets. Exam- 
ples of programs likely to do this are agricul- 
tural research, restaurant programs and scien- 
tific research bringing in national grants. 

The almost aborted Bramlagc baby is on 



schedule and should be ready to join the fami- 
ly of facilities in the fall of 1988-89 basket- 
ball season. Too late for most of us grandchil- 
dren — w ho paid the brunt of the costs — to 
use, but they say it's good for the family. This 
summer, Charles Thomas was named direc- 
tor. He would like to bring in family shows 
like Sesame Street and trade shows — attrac- 
tions students are bound to flock to. 

Groups began planning protests and recep- 
tions when they remembered President Rea- 
gan's promise to return to K-Stale on Alf 
Landon's 100 birthday this fall. It's odd that 
in most soap operas powerful characters who 
return are almost always villians. Anyway, 
there's not much of a chance the president 
will remember the promise he made five 
years ago. 

The Wildcats' favorite relative, Aggievil- 
lc, turned a year older along with its patrons. 
It's odd how three-fourths of the students are 
not allow to drink, yet the bars have about the 
same number of people in them year after 
year. 

"i he family's poor relative, Farrell Library, 
was forced to cancel about 3,000 books due 
to an unexpected rise in serial subscriptions. 
Father Wefald said he would like to improve 
the facility by making it more accessible to 



the state but not necessarily buying more 
research materials. 

And as for the Collegian, it will continue to 
relay the ongoing story of the Wildcats. This 
section is devoted to the opinions of the Col- 
legian staff through editorials, the thoughts of 
writers through regular columns and to the 
opinions of the readers through letters to the 
editor and guest columnists. 

Because the quality of this page depends 
on diversity of views, all readers arc encour- 
aged to write either letters to the editor, which 
must be 300 words or less, or guest columns 
which can't be more than 800 words or so. 

Another "don't" in the newspaper opinion 
business is sending unsigned letters. After all 
readers tend to think the writers are cowards 
and don't believe them. Plus, it makes the 
writers more responsible for what they write. 

The letters will be published when space is 
available — hopefully within the week they 
are received. I plan to publish most, if not all, 
of them to ensure readers are exposed to all 
the viewpoints. Of course, letters and col- 
umns deemed liabelous or in poor taste won't 
be primed. After all, newspapers generally 
are not in the business of misleading or lying 
to the readers, and this paper would like to 
stay in business a white longer. 



Tuition fees outpace 
inflation rate— again 



K-State can take dubious pride in 
knowing its tuition rose less than the 
national average this year. But it still 
out-paced the rate of inflation. 

Undergraduate students will see 
an increase of about 4 percent this 
school year, while the Consumer 
Price Index rose by 3 percent. The 
national average for four-year public 
institutions was up by 6 percent. 

Out-of-state students will find it 
difficult to find any good news when 
they pay fees the next two semesters. 
They will be paying $2,170 — an 
increase of 9 percent. The national 
average is 7 percent. 

Education Secretary William 
Bennett criticized the colleges for 
the increases. They increased the tui- 
tion because they think students can 
receive enough financial aid to meet 
the costs, he said. 

A spokesperson for the College 
Board said, "While (the amount of 
financial aid) is not sufficient to 
meet everyone's needs, students 



shouldn't let the cost figures frighten 

them." 

What shouid frighten them, how- 
ever, is the debt they could accumu- 
late in four or five years. 

Like 64 percent of public institu- 
tions in the College Board survey, K- 
State blames the cost increase on 
changes made in the student-cost 

ratio. 

In previous years, students paid 
about 25 percent of the total cost and 
the state picked up the rest. In the 
1986-87 year, in-state students will 
be paying 26.7 percent of the costs. 

States need to develop alternative 
ways to generate money for higher 
education. 

Legislators should remember that 
one of the reasons public universities 
have been funded in the past was to 
keep costs down so that everyone 
could use them. If they become 
accessible only to a wealthy few, 
they are not being used to their 
potential. 




Kansas State Collegian 



EDITOR 

D«rai Jatutton 
MANAGING EDITOR 

Becky Lueai 
NEWS EDITOR 

Jefl Bicker 
EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR 

Quinine DoU 
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tutffn 1 KT.IANHJSPS 291 020J u pubbahed by Student Publiciuon. Inc.. Kimei State !>-:■. enity.diily during the fill 
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IPONT KNOW HOW H^POeS 

iOPS TDITWNW FDLL, 



Ignorance rules world 

'Elite' duty to find answers 



Well, we arc all back for another year of 
higher education here at K-State By now, 
you all have been welcomed back enough 
times to know the University is glad to have 
you and your money, so 1 will dispense with 
the usual mushy garbage and gel down to ser- 
ious business. 

As college students, we arc part of an elite 
group. Only a very small percentage of peo- 
ple ever advance this far in their education. 
Colleges and universities are where world 
leaders arc trained, new technologies deve- 
loped and the knowledge of generations 
passed on. Take these away and we could 
very well revert to the Stone Age. 

However, being a part of this elite group 
carries with it great responsibilities. Even 
with all of this new knowledge, the world is 
growing more and more ignorant. Illiteracy 
in the United States is actually growing. 
Some estimates put the number of functional- 
ly illiterate adults at one-third of the popula- 
tion and rising. Newspapers arc being forced 
out of business by G.I. Joe and the "Dating 
Game." 

The majority of the people now receive 
most of their news in the form of 30-minutc 
television newscasts. These newscasts report 
only a small part of what is actually happen- 
ing in the world. They arc also prone to 
replacing real news with sensationalized dra- 
ma, such as those touching interviews with 
victims and survivors that have little value 
except as ratings boosters. 

This is what the people get when they 
watch the news, which they don't. A few 
months ago, Peter Jennings of ABC News did 
a story about how network affiliate stations 
are dropping the evening news in favor of 
shows like "Wheel or Fortune" It seems even 
the dramatic productions of television news 
are being ignored by a "dumb America." 

What litUc news Americans do digest is 



Commentary 




KIRK 
CARAWAY 

Collegian 
Columnist 



often flawed. News reported tor mass con- 
sumption tends to be bland, non-stimulating 
and middle-of-the-road. This is the result of 
the media trying to hide their biases. . g 

The American media also have a bad habit 
of reporting the facts and leaving out the con- 
text of the situation. This makes the facts 
essentially meaningless and leads to confu- 
sion and misinterpretation of the situation at 
hand, which can be worse than not knowing 
at all. Associated with this is the tendency to 
simplify things by using labels and buzz- 
words like communist, democracy and right- 
wing. These words and others are used to 
describe so many different situations that 
they lose all of their meaning and have a 
negative effect on finding the truth. 

Then we have the spectacle Known as the 
political campaign. This once noble process 
for determining the leaders of our country has 
degenerated into a batde of the public rela- 
tions wizards who sell their candidates like 
laundry dctergenL The message of the cam- 
paign has been shortened to the 30-second 
commercial where a candidate wraps himself 
in the flag, says a few catchy phrases and 
smiles at an audience that barely knows what 
he is talking about anyway. It is a miracle we 
haven i elected someone like Adolf Hider as 
president, although we have come closer than 



I care to think about. 

So this leaves us, America's up-and- 
coming elite, with some big problems. We 
are supposed to go out and fix these prob- 
lems, but we won't. Today's college students 
have become as much a part of "dumb Ameri- 
ca" as the rest of society. We watch "Wheel 
of Fortune" instead of the news. We read the 
"National Enquirer" instead of the 
"Washington Post." We care more about how 
our steak is cooked than about the millions 
who have nothing to cook. We have the stu- 
pidity to believe war is good because it helps 
the economy. 

Yes, we are a real sorry bunch. Even in 
University affairs, we couldn't even get one- 
third of the students to vote in last spring's 
student government elections. It's not hard to 
vote in these elections; all you need to do is 
bring your student ID card to the Union on 
one of the two days elections are held. If we 
can't even do something this simple, how are 
we going to even make a dent in fixing this 
screwed-up world? 

People nowadays seem to take everything 
for granted. Democracy is a process, not an 
institution. For this process to work, you have 
to participate and have knowledge of what is 
going on. It is very much like a chain in that it 
is only as strong as its weakest link. If you 
want to sit around and let others ran the gov- 
ernment for you, maybe you should consider 
moving to the Soviet Union. At least you'll 
be free from the responsibility of political 
participation. 

We had all better do something about the 
world while we still have one. It's up to us to 
do the changing because we're all that's left 
and we're running out of time. So if you 
choose to ignore this warning, good luck. Just 
remember. Ignorance is not bliss. 






KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN. Monday, Auguat 21, 1W7 



Accident victims' relatives 
must decide legal strategy 



By The Associated Pres s 

NEW YORK — Still numb with 
shock, relatives of victims in the 
Northwest Airlines crash arc now 
confronting a difficult decision: 
whether to accept cash settlement 
offers or take the carrier to court. 

Legal experts say the chances 
arc good thai families who success* 
fully sue Northwest are likely to 
win sharply higher damage awards 
from a jury than whatever they 
might get from the airline's insur- 
ance carrier, 

"The peopie who wait it out for 
eight months or a year get twice as 
much," said Melvin Belli, one of 
the nation's best known personal- 
injury lawyers and counsel to at 
least four families who lost rela- 
tives in the crash near Detroit that 
killed at least 1S6 people. 

Belli said in a telephone inter- 
view that he always advises clients 
to reject settlement offers from air- 
line insurance companies. 

He said based on past cases, 
awards could run up to SS million 
per victim, depending on their 
earning ability, number of depen- 
dents, education and social posi- 
tion in the community. 

On the other hand, many rela- 
tives may be tempted to accept 
whatever Northwest offers and try 
to put the trauma behind them, 
rather than risk protracted and nas- 
ty legal battles. 



Besides, there's always the pos- 
sibility thai a jury would decide a 
victim's family is entitled to less 
than the airline's initial offer, leav- 
ing the plaintifT not only with a 
smaller settlement but a hefty attor- 
ney fee, usually one-third of the 
award. 

More than a dozen lawsuits 
already have been filed against 
Northwest, most of them handled 
by well-known attorneys skilled in 
exacting large negligence awards 
from big companies. 

At the same lime, a number of 
complex legal questions have ari- 
sen, including what court to sue in, 
who is enliUcd to file a claim and 
who. besides Northwest, may be 
liable. 

Perhaps more importantly, the 
Aug. 16 crash of Flight 255 has 
revived some emotional issues 
about lawsuits, grief, greed and the 
value of a life, pitting client- 
hungry lawyers against airline 
insurers. 

'There is no easy way out of this 
thing," said Debbie Baye, who lost 
her 6-year-old daughter in the July 
9, 1982, crash of a Pan Am jet in 
Kcnncr, La. After a long ordeal, 
Baye and her husband John were 
awarded S523.0OO from a jury, an 
amount affirmed on appeal. 

"We didn't know what to do and 
we don't know whether we did the 
right thing," Debbie Baye said in a 
telephone interview. "At a time 



like this, the most important thing 
is prayer. Pray to get through. " 

Lawyers for plaintiffs generally 
demand at least $1 million from an 
airline in crash suits, said George 
Milko, an attorney for HALT, a 
Washtngion-bascd legal reform 
group that has published a hand- 
book for victims' families. 

Airline insurance adjusters are 
reluctant to divulge settlement 
awards, but Milko said his 
impression is that they begin mak- 
ing offers between $100,000 and 
5600,000. 

New York attorney Stuart Speis- 
cr, a wrongful death specialist who 
represents some families in the 
Northwest disaster, said the main 
criterion for determining damages 
is whether the victim had depen- 
dents, The value placed on young 
children and the elderly generally 
is much less. 

Differences in damage laws of 
each state also will play a major 
role in where suits arc filed. 

In the Northwest case, many of 
the victims resided in Arizona, 
which allows for punitive damages 
and recognizes the value of non- 
economic factors such as loss of 
companionship in determining 
compensation. Michigan law also 
recognizes non-economic losses, 
but docs not allow for punitive 
damages. 




Student Spouse Health Care 

available at Lafene health Center 
Student Spouses can be eligible for care to 
include all the available services at Lafene 
Student Health Center simply by paying the 
Spouse Health Fee each semester. This fee is for 
the same amount as the Student health fee and 
must be paid within 10 days of the time the 
students own health fees are paid. 

For more information 

contact Lafene Health Center at 

532-6544 




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Funds halt museum plan 




MANHATTAN 

5370084 

3012 ANDERSON 



MANHATTAN 

776-RENT 

419 EAST POYNTZ 



JUNCTION CITY 

238-7146 

843 GRANT AVE 



By Paltt Paxson 
Staff Writer 



Faced with a tack of money, a 
campus committee is continuing its 
efforts to get the go-ahead for the 
construction of a museum that would 
house K-Sute's 1,000-piece art 
collection. 

Though the KSU Foundation's 
executive committee has not official- 
ly approved the museum project, 
"the administration is firmly in favor 
of doing it," said Ruth Ann Wefald, 
chairwoman of the eight-month-old 
an museum steering committee, 

'The will (to build an art museum) 
is there," she said. "The fuel to make 
the whole thing go is what we lack 
right now." 



Boasting works by Pablo Picasso, 
Henri Matisse and Thomas Hart Ben- 
ton, K-Staie's art collection is scat- 
tered throughout campus offices, 
buildings and storerooms, or display- 
ed throughout the state while on loan 
to other institutions. 

Wefald said she is confident K- 
Siatc will eventually be able to build 
a museum for its art collection, but 
funding remains the primary barrier 
to starling planning and construction. 

Funds will most likely come from 
alumni and others interested in prom- 
oting the arts, she added. A sizable 
donation would be enough to start the 
project, she said. 

"We're looking for a major dona- 
tion in the area of $1 million," 
Wefald said. 



The committee conducted a feasi- 
bility study to determine a budget for 
the construction of the museum, pos- 
sible building sites and interest in the 
project. The proposed budget is 
about $3.8 million, Wefald said. 

Although there is a significant 
amount of support to build an art 
museum, some concerns about start- 
ing the project at this particular time 
have been raised. Tackling a large 
funding campaign while Bramlagc 
Coliseum is still under construction 
and the troubled Kansas economy 
were two concerns expressed, 
Wefald said. 

The art museum committee will be 
traveling throughout the state to 
promote fine arts at K-State and 
drum up support for die museum. 



Dorm contract numbers rise 



By The Collegian Staff 



Requests for campus residence 
hall rooms are up 18 percent from 
last year, and about 4,100 students 
will be living in residence halls, K- 
Statc housing officials -said last 
week. 



Tom Frith, director of housing, 
said 576 more contracts were 
requested over last year's 3,211 
requests. 

Frith attributes the increase to a 
projected increase in enrollment, 
increased recruitment efforts and the 
"fine job" being done by the housing 



staff and individual hall governing 
boards. 

Because of the overflow of stu- 
dents living in residence halls this 
year, space normally not used for 
housing — located primarily in Put- 
nam and Boyd Halls — is being 



i 

1 

E 

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a 

a 
i 
i 

! 

I! 
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made available. 

CONGRATULATIONS -«fe^ I 

to the Fall 1987 Pledges of jPjjJif 1 

JELTA SIGMA pwt *&6f I 




Dan Bartels 
Rob Basgall 
Brent Bestwick 
Brad Bodine 
Jim Booth 
Greg Brown 
Rob Brune 
Andy Evans 
David Filippi 
Craig Grable 
David Hercules 
Neal Hinkle 
Lee Hurley 
Brent Jennings 
Dennis Kohout 
Bart Lewis 



Toptka, Kb 
Victoria, Ks 
Manhattan. Ks 
Douglass, Ks 
Broomfield, Co 
Omaha, Ne 
Aurora, Co 
St. Joseph, Mo 
Topeka, Ks 
Wathena, Ks 
St. Louis, Mo 
Wichita, Ks 
Jefferson City, Mo 
Dresden, Ks 
Elkhorn, Ne 
Topeka, Ks 



Marc McChesney 
Todd McLaury 
Jason Miles 
Eric Moore 
Dan Prohaska 
Pat Roemer 
Todd Rohr 
Chris Sapp 
Doug Schwenk 
Mike Shipman 
Joe Smith 
Tim Thiessen 
Scott Thirkell 
Doug Twaddel 
Brian Vossen 
Craig Whiteford 



Munden, Ks 
Bolivar, Mo 
Manhattan, Ks 
Superior, Ne 
Atchison, Ks 
Arvada, Co 
Cunningham, Ks 
Excelsior Springs, Mo 
Manhattan, Ks 
Aurora, Co 
Atchison, Ks 
Hutchinson, Ks 
Salina, Ks 
Beloit, Ks 
Topeka, Ks 
Greenwich, Ct 



1 



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l.=ir=Jr= 



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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Monday, Au9u»» 2*. 1M? 



City clamps down 
on expansion near 
University areas 




University overlay district in shaded area 



Suff/M«ry Witd 



By Janet Swanson 

Agri/Business Editor 

The Urban Area Planning 
Board is taking steps to rectify 
traffic and parking problems in 
(he University overlay, the resi- 
dential area surrounding campus. 

The board is proposing an 
amendment to the city's zoning 
ordinances that would make the 
uses of land in the overlay condi- 
tional rather than permitted. Con- 
ditional uses are considered on a 
case-by-case basis. 

The overlay contains special 
provisions that allow the areas to 
be zoned for University-related 
uses, including parking lots, an 
galleries, museums, boarding 
houses and offices. 

The amendment would formal- 
ize a review process for land uses 
in the overlay area and require a 
public hearing before changes can 
be approved. 

'The problem many residents 
have found is that the University 
overlay permitted loo much to 
occur without it being subject to 
public review," said Vickie Hil- 



pen, Manhattan project planner. 

"Areas zoned for single- family 
dwellings can be overlaid to allow 
multi-family dwellings," said W. 
Lawrence Garvin, director of 
facility planning and University 
architecL 

While Garvin is concerned 
about protecting residential areas, 
he said multi-family structures 
should be maintained because 
they offer alternatives to resi- 
dence halls. 

"Most of the fraternities and 
sororities have been grand- 
fathered by previous ordinances 
but can probably petition for a 
variance if they want to expand," 
she said. 

The amendment, which should 
be in place by the end of the year, 
will provide city planners with 
more control over expansion, said 
Eric Caitell, Manhattan city 
planner. 

The amendment would provide 
a second zoning district, separate 
from the present overlay, that 
would be used for land purchased 
for University activities. 



Democrats in Iowa forum 



Economic plans debated 



By The Associated Press 

DES MOINES, Iowa -- Seven 
Democratic presidential hopefuls 
traded gentle economic jabs Sunday 
in a two-hour debate at the Iowa State 
Fair, with Massachusetts Gov. 
Michael Dukakis at the center of 
much of the fire. 

While the seven reserved most of 
their heavy blows for the Reagan 
administration, several pressed 
Dukakis to defend the centerpiece of 
his campaign: claiming credit for 
economic revival in his home state. 

'The problem with what Governor 
Dukakis said is it contains no specif- 
ics whatsoever," said Sen. Alben 
Gore Jr. of Tennessee. "With all due 
respect to my friend from Massa- 
chusetts, we need some specifics." 

Sen. Paul Simon of Illinois noted 
that defense spending in Massa- 
chusetts has increased by 59 percent 



during Dukakis' tenure. "Thai's a 
pretty healthy welfare check for the 
state of Massachusetts." he said. 

Rep. Richard Gephardt of Mis- 
souri noted that there might be a link 
between the criticism and Dukakis* 
standing in the polls. 

"If I get io 52 percent in the polls in 
New Hampshire, will you start 
attacking me like you attacked Gov- 
ernor Dukakis?" Gephardt asked 
Gore. 

Dukakis said he didn't "think any- 
body was picking on me." 

"I like debate, I like discussions, 
one never knows what's going to 
happen," Dukakis said. "I thought it 
was a good discussion, a good 
debate. This adventure is very 
unpredictable." 

The exchanges came before more 
than 1 ,000 lowans who look lime out 
from the com dogs and catde shows 
at the fair. 



The debate, sponsored by the Iowa 
Broadcast News Association, was 
the first of a scries of meetings for the 
seven candidates in Iowa, with at 
least three more scheduled before the 
state holds its Feb. 8 precinct cau- 
cuses, the nation's first test of Demo- 
cratic presidential strength. 

Efforts to arrange a similar debate 
of Republican presidential hopefuls 
fell through in the face of resistance 
from the organizations of Vice Presi- 
dent George Bush and Senate Repu- 
blican leader Robert Dole of Kansas, 
who lead in early public opinion 
polls. 

The candidates said Sunday's 
debate was important both because it 
was broadcast statewide on Iowa 
Public Television and because it 
gave Democrats a chance to spell out 
their economic programs, an area 
where the party has been considered 
weak in past presidential elections. 

"In a sense, this is the litmus test 
for Democrats," said Sen. Joseph 
Bidcn of Delaware. "People don't 



think we're fiscally responsible. Any 
Democrat who proposes any new 
program better say precisely how 
they'll pay for it," 

Dukakis argued that 1988 election 
will turn on pocketbook issues, and 
that he has the best record because 
he's taken his state from being "an 
economic and financial basket case" 
to the "Massachusetts miracle." 

Gephardt said that's approaching 
the presidency "looking through a 
regional prism" and is irrelevant to 
most of the country. 

Former Arizona Gov. Bruce Bab- 
bitt took time to criticize Gephardt 
for his plans to allow farmers to cut 
back on production. 

"I think they're well-intentioned," 
Babbitt said. "But I don't think that 
will work. I think there's a better 
way." 

Jesse Jackson argued that Demo- 
crats must sharpen their message and 
present a clear alternative if they are 
to be successful next year. 



Closed Classes — Fall 1987 



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BACK BY POPULAR DEMAND 




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Mon.-Thurs. 
11 a.m.-2 a.m. 

Fri.-Sat. 

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Sunday 
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IN THE WOMEN'S DEPARTMENT 

Casual Pants 

Originally $28-$32 

Denim Jeans 

Originally S21 .99-S56 

10 & 15 Button 

Knit Tops $o n « 

Originally $24 . .. U Ull 

Riverwash 

Twill Tops 

Originally $28-538 

Select Sweaters 

Originally $29 

Denim Jackets 

Originally S55-S98 

IN THE MEN'S DEPARTMENT 

Rugby Shirts 

Originally $25 

Denim Jeans 

Originally $26 $58 

Denim Jackets 

Originally $40-$96 



s 6off 
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MAURICES 

Wham Faihton Oo*m't Co«t A Fortum 



■» L r »j 



118 SOUTH FOURTH STREET-DOWNTOWN MANHATTAN 



™^" 



■ 



Baltics recall takeover 



Anniversary 
marked by 
protestors 

By The Associated Pratt 

MOSCOW — Thousands of peo- 
ple in the Baltic capitals braved 
police barricades Sunday to protest 
the 1939 Hitler-Stalin pact that 
allowed the Soviets to take over Lat- 
via, Lithuania and Estonia, sources 
said, 

Sunday was the 48th anniversary 
of the non-aggression pact between 
Nazi German dictator Adolf Hitler 
and Soviet leader Josef Stalin, which 
delayed Russian fighting in World 
War II and deeded control of the Bal- 
tic republics to the Soviet Union. 
Some Western nations, including 
the United Slates, regard the Baltics 
as "enslaved nations" under Soviet 
control. 

Baltic residents told Western 
reporters in Moscow that hundreds of 
police turned out to control demon- 
strations in the capital cities of Riga, 
Latvia; Vilnius, Lithuania; and Tal- 
linn, Estonia. 

Jartis Roskalns, a Latvian nation- 
alist who laid a wreath at Riga's 
monument to war victims, told The 
Associated Press by telephone that at 
least 2,000 gathered at the memorial 
around noon. 

He said as many as 5,000 tried to 
reach the cordoned-off square 
throughout the afternoon and that 
many of the elderly sobbed while 
recounting the republic's suffering in 
the 1940s. 

'Those who were bold managed to 
get through to the monument," said 
Roskalns, 38. He said about 500 uni- 
formed and plainclothes police setup 
barricades and closed off a pedest- 
rian underpass to the monument. 

Roskalns said authorities took 
away a man who held up a placard 
demanding, "Publish the facts about 
the Stalin cult" and seized a photo- 
grapher believed to be a foreigner 
and smashed his video camera. 

A Western visitor who spoke on 
condition of anonymity reported 



from Vilnius that about 500 protes- 
ters gathered at noon outside Sl 
Anna's Catholic Church. Police 
ringed the cathedral, but demonstra- 
tors brushed by them and were allow- 
ed to assemble, the source said. 

The official Tass news agency 
declared the Vilnius protest a "flop" 
and set the number of participants al 
"only 250-300." But the agency dis- 
closed that (hey were protesting the 
installation of Soviet power in 1940. 

Tass said nothing about the pro- 
tests in Tallinn and Riga. 

Details of the Tallinn protest were 
not immediately available in Mos- 
cow, but Roskalns said Latvian 
activists learned it had taken place. 



"The senators' message 
coJncldes...with the over- 
tly instlgatory, anti -Soviet 
campaign launched In 
recent weeks by Western 
radio voices broadcast- 
ing to the Soviet Union, 
including those subver- 
sive radio stations which 
are financed and 
directed by the U.S. Cen- 
tral Intelligence 
Agency." 

—The Communist Party 
dally newspaper Pravda 



Sunday's demonstrations and Red 
Square protests last month by Cri- 
mean Tatars who want to return to 
their Black Sea homeland demon- 
strated a more lenient approach to 
dissent in line with Soviet leader 
Mikhail S. Gorbachev's policy of 
"glasnost," or openness on selected 
issues. 

The Baltic protests and the public- 
ity given them by Western broadcas- 
ters over the past few days prompted 
an outcry from Soviet media, which 
published at least 15 commentaries 
over the weekend denouncing the 
broadcasts and explaining the Krem- 
lin position. 

Provisions of the Aug. 23, 1939, 
pact, signed by then-Soviet Foreign 



Minister Vyacheslav Molotov and 
Nazi Foreign Minister Joachim von 
Ribbcntrop, became public in the 
West after Germany fell. But until 
last week the Kremlin rarely ack- 
nowledged the agreement and 
explained it as a ploy to buy lime to 
prepare for eventual war with the 
Nazis. 

A Tass interview with historian 
Herman Trukan disclosed to Soviets 
that the agreement divided areas of 
Eastern Europe into Soviet and Ger- 
man spheres of influence. 

Trukan restated the official Soviet 
version of the takeover that Baltic 
peoples voted to join the Soviet state 
and that Soviet troops entered the 
small nations because the people 
wanted their protection against the 

Nazis. 

Sunday's protests were announced 
in the United States and Western 
Europe by emigre organizations that 
advocate a return to independence 
for the three Baltic nations. 

A group of 20 U.S. senators wrote 
Soviet officials asking that protests 
be allowed to take place without 
interference. That request also drew 
fire from Soviet media. 

The Communist Party daily Prav- 
da said Sunday, "The senators' mes- 
sage coincides... with the overtly 
instigatory, anti-Soviet campaign 
launched in recent weeks by Western 
radio voices broadcasting to the 
Soviet Union, including those sub- 
versive radio stations which are 
financed and directed by the U.S. 
Central Intelligence Agency." 

Radio Moscow and Soviet Televi- 
sion called the Western broadcasts "a 
crude provocation violating interna- 
tional law," and said such protests 
were "incompatible with the existing 
systems in Lithuania, Latvia and 
Estonia." 

In what was widely viewed as an 
attempt to dilute nationalist senti- 
ments, some of the most prominent 
activists have been exiled to the 

West. 

Roskalns was pardoned this year 
from a labor camp sentence for 
alleged anti -Soviet activity. But he 
said he was ordered to leave the 
Soviet Union and plans to go to West 
Germany next week with his wife 
and children. 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN. Monday, Aupu.l 24, 1987 



University hopes to sell land 



By The Collegian Staff 

The KSU Foundation has refused 
to pay the taxes on three lots of land 
located 20 miles north of Manhattan 
in University Park. 

Dave Weaver, administrative 
assistant for the Foundation, said the 
land is almost worthless due to its 
rural location, and the Foundation 
has been unable to sell it. The taxes 
were allowed to become deliquent in 




UNION 

PROGRAM 

COUNCIL 



hopes the Riley County treasurer 
would be able to auction the land. 

The lots were originally part of a 
large Foundation development pro- 
ject The Foundation sold all of the 
land except the three lots. 

Even though the land was deve- 
loped into a residential area, and 
includes a golf course, a local real 
estate appraiser said the Foundation 
"couldn't even give the land away." 

According to records in the trca- 



0* u 




surcr's olt ice, taxes on one of the lots 
have not been paid since 1979, while 
Uixcs for the other two have been 
deliquent since 1978. The Founda- 
tion owes $285 in delinquent taxes. 

Huwever, because the Foundation 
wishes to rid itself of the land, there 
arc no plans to pay the taxes. 

"If we put any money into this 
land." Weaver said, "it would be 
money - that could go for scholar- 
ships - going for nothing." 






K-STATE UNION 
2ND FLOOR SHOWCASE 

"Papier Mache Sculpture" 

by Sylvia Beeman 

through September 11 



m 



k-gtate union 



Tourists visit Amish town; 
citizens divided on benefits 



By Th» Associated ggg 

HARMONY. Minn. — Curiosi- 
ty about the devout, oldfashioned 
Amish lifestyle has become the hot 
ticket for Michel Farm Vacations, 
a new tourism business in a south- 
eastern Minnesota town that has 
fell the sting of a troubled farm 
economy. 

"The main draw is the Amish. 
Those tours and our (gift) store are 
carrying us now. They're way 
ahead of what 1 expected,*' said 
Vernon Michel, who started the 
business last fall with his wife, 
Paula. 

"Our idea is to bring people here 
for a week to util ize the whole area, 
instead of pulling them off the 
highway and into town for a couple 
of hours or a day," said Michel. 

"We want to tie everything this 



area has to offer together — the 
Amish, trout fishing, canoeing, 
hiking and hunting — to the farms, 
historic sites and golf courses." 
said Michel, whose company basi- 
cally acts as a booking agent. 

The business serves as a liaison 
between eager tourists and bed- 
and-breakfast farms, rural cabins 
for rcnu Amish wanting customers 
for their homemade goods and var- 
ious recreational businesses and 
tourist attractions in southeastern 
Minnesota and northeastern Iowa. 

Some of the Amish, who sell 
everything from fresh pics and gar- 
den produce to bright woven egg 
baskets and rolltop desks, welcome 
the extra income from the tourists. 

"1 don't mind them, if they don't 
ask religious questions. They can 
take pictures of buildings and ani- 
mals, but not of humans," said 



Lydia Ann Hcrshberger, an Amish 
woman, as she set a sheet of hot 
date cookies down to cool. 

"I don't mind farm questions. I 
enjoy people coming, as long as we 
make sales," she added. 

On the 1860s-style Amish farm 
of Jerry Hershberger and Henry 
Petershiem, visitors may watch 
work in the buggy repair and wheel 
shop, buy Lydia Ann's baked 
goods or watch her skillfully hand- 
stitch the pieced quilts of others. 
'There are about 10 Amish 
farms where we can take car tours. 
But they've said no more bus 
tours." Michel said. "I can't blame 
them for not wanting the buses. I 
think they're concerned about lia- 
bility. It's hard to control a bus 
crowd. The Amish are afraid kids 
could get hurt and then sue. They 
don't carry insurance." 



upc arts 



WELCOME BACK 
DANCE! 

This Fri., Aug. 28th 

9 p.m.-12 Midnight 

K-State Union 

Catskeller 

Cost is only $11 

Music by 
Best Sound Around 



& 




Kansas State Bank 



STUDENT LOANS 




We want to make 
your student loan! 

Simply contact us at: 

537-4400 

Lender Code #821176 



If vou have received your promissory note, bring it in or 
mail it to Kansas State Bank, 1010 Westloop or 11th & 
Bluemont. 



Kansas State Bank 



K^^rs- 



Get Organized! 



? 



Get your copy of week-at-a-giance planning calendar today. Cost is only 
$3 001 It contains valuable coupons good at the union and UPC events the 
University academic calendar and other important University even s. Plus 
phone numbers, sports schedules, and a whole lot ^MM *• 
Bookstore, Information Desk, and Activities Center (K-State Union 3rd 

Floor). 

Iflfflfcstate union 

LiaZlupc promotion* 



JAMES 
STEWART 



IN 



ROPE 



' ?t, 



ROPE, Alfred Hitchcock's favorite film, is also 
his rarest, most intriguing and unprecedented 
movie. His first color film and the first movie he 
ever produced, ROPE's title is taken from the 
murder weapon. A curious intellectual drama 
about two rich young men who murder a third and 
throw a party around the corpse. 



Wednesday, August 26, Forum Hall, 
7:30 p.m. and Thursday, August 27, 
Little Theatre, 3:30 p.m. & Forum 
Hall, 7:30 p.m. $1.75;KSU ID 
Required; Rated PG. 



upckataidosco 



Jupc 



oscop* 



vjm TUgl to Mtorta 



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k: 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, ggflft A "B >< " M ' 1W? 



Bridgeton leads tankers 

^"^ p.- in — :— - •■•'• h„ii,.nnt,Ti- Shinninff and salvage experts 

Convoy's 



mission 
a success 

By Ttr A$todot«d Prm 

MANAMA, Bahrain The 

mine-damaged supertanker Bridge- 
ion and two U.S. warship escorts 
Sunday steamed down the Persian 
Gulf far ahead of a convoy of three 
smaller, U.S. -registered Kuwaiti 
Linkers and two warships. 

"It was another successful exer- 
cise in subterfuge by the American 
Navy," said one Dubai-based sal- 
vage expert U.S. officials are striv- 
ing to keep convoy movements sec- 
ret and unpredictable. 

All the tankers left Kuwait 
together early Saturday. It was not 



clear whether the other tankers 
would catch up with the Bridgeton 
later for the dangerous transit past 
Iranian anti-ship missile emplace- 
ments at the Strait of Hormuz, the 
gateway out of the gulf. 

Iraq meanwhile said its warplanes 
Sunday bombed the Iranian petro- 
chemical complex at Bandar Kho- 
meini on the northern gulf coast for 
the second time in 24 hours and said 
Iranian shelling killed 12 civilians in 
Basra, southern Iraq. Iran did not 
comment on the report. 

The 401, 382-ton Bridgeton and 
the destroyer Kidd were spotted by a 
team from the NBC broadcast net- 
work aboard a helicopter about 100 
miles southeast of the smaller 

tankers. 

By early evening the patched-up 
supertanker, one of the largest in the 
world, was reported to be in interna- 
tional waters off the United Arab 
Emirates. 

The USS Guadalcanal and its Sea 



Stallion mine-sweeping helicopters 
scouted the waters ahead, said gulf- 
based shipping executives and 
another group of reporters posted 
farther south along the gulf. 

On July 24, a mine blasted a hole 
in the Bridgeton off an Iranian island 
in the northern gulf, but the vessel 
safely sailed through the same waters 
Saturday for the return journey. 

The 8 1.283 -ton Sea Isle City and 
the 79,999-ton Ocean City, both 
tankers, and the 46,723-ton Gas 
King, a liquefied gas carrier, 
anchored for 12 hours about 50 miles 
off Bahrain. 

They sailed at 3 p.m. escorted by 
the destroyers Hawes and Klakring. 
said Brent Sadler, a reporter for Bri- 
tain's Independent Television News 
who saw them leave. 

Sadler also said that the Hawcs, 
without warning, sailed toward his 
chartered boat, bumped into it and 
clipped off its antenna, but there was 
no serious damage. 



Shipping and salvage experts said 
the U.S. command signaled the 
Bridgeton to steam ahead past the 
anchored tankers before dawn Sun- 
day, but its progress was not spotted 
until later. 

The Dubai shipping expert, whose 
radio operators monitor gulf naviga- 
tion, said the lumbering Bridgeton 
was sailing at about 5 mph. about half 
its top speed. All the shipping sour- 
ces spoke on condition of anonymity. 

It was die fifth one-way convoy of 
Kuwaiti tankers flying the American 
Rag and escorted by U.S. warships to 
protect them from attacks by Iran. 

The United States has blamed Iran 
for laying mines in the gulf and just 
outside its entrance in the Gulf of 
Oman. 

Iran at first said "invisible hands" 
laid the explosives but later an Ira- 
nian official conceded his nation 
planted some mines "to defend our 
coastlines." 



Judge's remarks 
bring reprimand 



By Tht Astoclot»d Prttt 

WICHITA — A committee 
that reviews the conduct of feder- 
al judges has reprimanded U.S. 
District Court Judge Patrick Kelly 
of Wichita for making "demean- 
ing" comments to Topeka lawyer 
Fred W. Phelps Sr. during a 
hearing. 

The reprimand against Kelly 
was issued last week by the three- 
judge Judicial Conference Com- 
mittee to Review Circuit Court 
Conduct and Disability Orders. It 
carries no penalty. 

Marge Phelps, Phelp's daught- 
er, said Kelly had questioned the 
lawyer's professionalism, hones- 
ty and integrity during a March 
13, 1985 hearing in U.S. District 
Court in Wichita. 

She said court transcripts show 



Kelly adjourned the hearing, say- 
ing: "Let's just leave it this way: 
You leave this courtroom for the 
last time and, for my part, it is with 
a sense of relief that I say to you, 
sir, good riddance." 

Kelly, contacted at his home 
over the weekend, said he had 
received the reprimand but 
declined further comment. 

Members of the extended 
Phelps family — 1 1 of ihem are 
lawyers — have had a bitter rela- 
tionship with Kansas' federal 
judges. 

In December, 1985, all nine 
U.S. District Court judges in Kan- 
sas filed a disciplinary complaint 
against seven members of the 
family, charging that they had 
maligned and intimidated the 
bench. 




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FACULTY AND STAFF MEMBERS: 

Don't be left out of the 1987-1988 
K-State Campus Directory. 

Bo sure to get your 1987-1988 K-State Campus Directory listing 
updated. Personnel Services provides the faculty/staff list for the 
directory and if individuals have not updated their records, the 
directory entry is inaccurate. We would like your assistance in 
updating the faculty/staff listings. 

The following information is needed for individual listings: name 
home address, campus address, home phone, campus phone, faculty/ 
staff title, and office/department/division. 

Please take a few minutes to check last year's directory. If anything 
has changed, for PER 39 must be completed and submitted to 
Personnel Services by Aug. 28. Aug. 28 is also the deadline to submit 
individual "Personnel Appointment" forms (TER 39) for 
unclassified and classified individuals and GST forms for graduate 
student employees. 

Anyone wishing to withhold his or her name from the directory 
must submit a letter to Personnel Services by Aug. 28. 

If you have questions, please contact Sheila in Personnel 
Services, Employee Benefits and Records, 532-6277. 





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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Mondiy, Auguat 24, 1M7 



TWA jet lands after losing wheels 



• 



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By The) Anoctot»d PrfS 

BELLEVILLE, HI. — Passengers 
fearing for ihcir lives screamed, wept 
and prayed as a TWA jetliner 
approached Scott Air Force Base for 
an emergency landing without one 
set of wheels. 

Moments before the Jetliner land- 
ed safely Saturday, "The pilot came 
on.. .and said, '1 wish you all well.' 
People began to cry," recalled pas- 
senger Ken Lew of San Francisco. 

"It made people think it was the 
end. It was a horrible experience," 
Lew said after the TWA Boeing 767 



touched down at Scott on two of its 
three landing gears and skidded 
along the runway on its right engine, 
spraying sparks. 

TWA Flight 756, bound for Sl 
Louis from San Francisco with 169 
passengers and 12 airline employees, 
was diverted from Lambcrl-St. Louis 
International Airport to the base in 
southern Illinois when its right rear 
landing gear failed to lower and lock 
into place, officials said. 

On Sunday, investigators from the 
National Transportation Safety 
Board and TWA worked at Scott, 
inspecting the crippled jetliner for 



clues that might explain why the 
right landing wheels failed to lower, 
said 1st Lt. Jerry Lobb, assistant 
chief of public affairs at the base. 

One man broke his ankle and nine 
other passengers suffered minor inju- 
ries when they slid down inflatable 
emergency chutes after the jetliner 
landed, Lobb said. 

TWA officials said the jetliner was 
diverted from Lam ben because the 
pilot fctt Scott would be better 
equipped to handle a major emergen- 
cy, with rescue vehicles on hand and 
the base hospital minutes away. 

After landing, the passengers were 



taken by bus to Lambert for connect- 
ing flights to their destinations Satur- 
day night or Sunday, Lobb said. 

"It was the scariest thing that ever 
happened to me in my life," said Judy 
Anderson of San Francisco who was 
flying to St. Louis lo visit relatives. 
"People threw up all over the place. 
I'm just glad I'm alive." 

Frank Siegcl, a banker from Col- 
umbus, Ohio, said most passengers 
thought they were about to die when 
flight attendants instructed them to 
"prepare for an impact landing." 

"It was scary. There were times it 
was terrifying," he said. 



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Japan expels Soviet trade officer 



By The Associoted Press 

TOKYO -- Soviet Vice Trade 
Representative Yuri G. Pokrovsky 
left Japan Sunday, three days after 
being ordered out in an exchange of 
expulsions between Japan and the 
Soviet Union. 

Pokrovsky flew home on a Soviet 
Aeroflot plane, an airline official 
said. 

Japan announced on Thursday it 



was expelling him because he failed 
to appear for questioning on allega- 
tions he bought information about 
aircraft instruments and controls sto- 
len from a Japanese company. 

The announcement came shortly 
after Moscow said it was ordering 
out a Japanese defense attache, 
Nobuhiro Takcshima. for alleged 
espionage activities, and a Japanese 
businessman, Takao Otani, for pur- 
portedly trying to obtain commercial 



Britons bury dead 



By The Associated Press 

HUNGF.RFORD, England 
Hundreds of churchgoers wept and 
prayed Sunday for the victims of Bri- 
tain's worst mass murder and for the 
quiet local man who turned into a 
killer on a sunny summer afternoon. 

The Anglican, Roman Catholic 
and Methodist churches were packed 
as this small market town 60 miles 
west of London united in grief and 
remembered the victims of Michael 
Ryan's massacre Wednesday. 

At the largest service, in the Angli- 
can Parish Church of Sl Lawrence, 
parishoncr Trudy Pihlens read out 
the list of 16 victims killed and 14 
injured and then added: "And 
Michael Ryan, may God have mercy 
on his soul." 

Relatives of some of those gunned 
down clung to each other and almost 
everyone wept or fought back tears. 
A young woman, not related to any 
victim, collapsed and was helped 
from church. A London Broadcast- 
ing Co. radio repondrtafd onMnem- 
ber of the congregation cursed when 
Ryan's name was mentioned. 



Police piecing together Ryan's 
lifestyle said Sunday they were 
investigating claims that the 27-year- 
old gun-lover kept a secret arms 
cache and was a key figure in an 
illegal gun-dealing network. 

The Sunday Mirror said it handed 
a dossier lo Thames Valley Police 
which claimed the unemployed Ryan 
sold "hot" guns for use in armed rob- 
beries and enjoyed a lavish lifestyle 
with the proceeds. 

Ryan was reported as being able to 
obtain any gun or ammunition he 
wanted. 

He used a Kalashnikov assault 
rifle in the massacre. 

Thames Valley Police said Sun- 
day: "We are investigating the 
report. We can't say whether it's 
right or wrong at the moment." 

Police have said they don't know 
what sparked Ryan's shooting spree. 
Psychiatrists say they believe he was 
suffering from acute schizophrenia. 



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secrets from the Soviet Trade 
Ministry. 

Japan's Foreign Ministry denied it 
was expelling Pokrovsky in retalia- 
tion. It also said no basis existed to 
the Soviet charges against Takeshi- 
ma, one of three Japanese defense 
attaches stationed in Moscow. 

Takcshima, the first Japanese dip- 
lomat ordered out of the Soviet 
Union since World War II, was 
expected to return to Japan this week. 



Japanese-Soviet relations chilled 
during past months over allegations 
of illegal transfers of high technolo- 
gy material from Japan to the Soviet 
Union. 

In April, the Japanese government 
said Toshiba Machine Co. illegally 
sold Moscow computerized milling 
machines. The United States said the 
machines enabled the Soviets to 
build quieter submarines. 




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10 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN. Mondty, Augiwl 24, WW 



Woman learns politics of toxic waste 



Love Canal leader 
reflects on triumph 



By Tht Attoclotfrd Prois 

WASHINGTON — Hazardous 
waste transformed Lois Marie Gibbs. 
Nine years ago, this housewife from 
Niagara Falls, N.Y., rose up in anger 
and led her neighbors at Love Canal 
in a battle to force the government to 
buy their houses and promise to clean 
up what became the nation's most 
infamous dump. 

Now, she teaches others what she 
learned; that hazardous waste clea- 
nup is more a political than a scientif- 
ic issue. 

Since 1981 she has run the non- 
profit Citizen's Clearinghouse for 
Hazardous Wastes, based in Arling- 
ton, Va. It works with more than 
1,700 environmental organizations, 
as well as neighborhood groups, 
labor unions and religious leaders. 

Today, Gibbs is 37, divorced and 
remarried to Steven Lester, a lexico- 
logist who helped in the Love Canal 
battle and now works at the clearing- 
house. They have a 21 -month-old 
son and Gibbs has a boy and a girl 
from her first marriage. 

While 5S0 Love Canal families 
were eventually evacuated and the 
dump capped, the saga is not over. 
Lawsuits totaling $15 billion are still 
pending and the canal is leaking 
dioxins into neighboring creeks and 
sewers. A hearing on a federal plan to 
clean up the dioxins is scheduled for 



Tuesday in Whealfield, N.Y. 

Lois Gibbs is still involved — but 
no longer obssessed. 

"After Love Canal, I felt it was 
critically important, because of all 
that I had learned and some of my 
neighbors had learned, that we pro- 
vide a service toother Lois Gibbscs," 
she said. 

"I still don't consider myself an 
environmentalist; 1 rather consider 
myself somebody who helps fight for 
justice," she noted. "I don't eat 
bcansptouts and yogurt and that sort 
of stuff. I care less about the snail 
darter and more about the child in 
Mississippi with the brain tumor" 
caused by toxic chemicals. 

Gibbs grew up trusting in govern- 
ment and die American way. She 
married a chemical worker, had two 
children, and in 1972, they bought a 
modest bungalow in a development 
built around a toxic landfill. 

Neither the Gibbses nor their 
neighbors knew this, but the city of 
Niagara Falls did. So did Hooker 
Chemical Co., which dumped some 
21,800 tons of noxious substances in 
the canal from 1942 to 1952. 

Hooker sold the canal and sur- 
rounding land to the city in 1953 for a 
token $1 with the proviso that Hook- 
er not be held liable for future prob- 
lems related to the dump. Occidental 
Petroleum Corp., which purchased 
Hooker after Love Canal, continues 



to deny liability. 

The first hint Gibbs had that some- 
thing was wrong was when her son 
Michael, then 6, began to have sei- 
zures after he started attending the 
99th Street School. She soon discov- 
ered that the school and playground 
were built on top of Love Canal, a 
3,000 foot-long, poison-filled 
trough. 

Talking to neighbors, she learned 
many of them were sick. Some 
showed her chemical ooze in their 
back yards; others pointed out base- 
ment sump pumps giving off noxious 
odors. Their kids played with "fire 
rocks" that exploded in flames when 
thrown to the ground. 

It took years of public hearings, 
health tests, chemical sampling, peti- 



tions and grass-roots organizing to 
get something done. Finally, all but 
62 families were evacuated and their 
homes bought out, at a cost of $24.8 
million. 

The Environmental Protection 
Agency issued a feasibility study in 
June, suggesting three alternatives 
for cleaning up the leaking dioxins. 
In July, the EPA said it believed the 
best option would be to bum the sedi- 
ments at very high temperatures, 
thereby destroying 99.9 percent of 
the dioxins. The "ctean dirt" should 
then be stored in a permanent con- 
tainment facility at Love Canal, the 
EPA said. 

Gibbs charged that there is no real 
need to store the clean sediments at 
Love Canal. 



"The reason they're pushing for 
on-site containment is ifsomething is 
always on site, the stale Department 
of Health never has to make a habita- 
bility statement," she said. 

The same situation is true at Times 
Beach, Mo., another community that 
was evacuated because of chemical 
contamination, she said. 

"It's much cheaper politically and 
economically to abandon these areas 
and not have people move back in. 
Because in order to clean them up 
sufficiently, it would cost well over 
$20 million at each and every site," 
she argued. "To move people out and 
say this area is no longer safe is much 
cheaper." 

While she has mixed memories of 
Love Canal, Gibbs said the experi- 



ence overall was positive for her. : 

"Being a victim was horrible," she 
said. "But the experience of learning - 
how the world runs and how you can 
make a difference, individually and 
collectively, is an experience that 
was terrific. 

"It's given me the ability not only 
to become who I am but to be able to 
go out and share this information 
with other people, with a sense of 
confidence and sort of a vision that 
you can fight this and you can win," 
Gibbs said. 



Looking for 

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AGGCVK.IE USA 



The tradition continues 

We're still the same old party place 

Join us for another year of fun 

WELCOME BACK STUDENTS! 




Penn begins term 




By The Associated Press 

LOS ANGELES -- Actor Sean 
Penn forsook the rural jail where he 
served the first part of a sentence for 
probation violation and checked into 
the huge Los Angeles County Centr- 
al Jail to complete his term, officials 
said Sunday. 

Penn, 27, who has lately received 
more attention for his fisticuffs than 
his roles in such films as 'The Falcon 
and the Snowman" and "Fast Times 



at Ridgemont High," was booked 
into the downtown lockup late Satur- 
day, said sheriff's Sgt. John 
Andrews. 

More than 5,000 prisoners are 
confined at the Central Jail. 

The feisty husband of singer 
Madonna served the first five days of 
his term in the Mono County Jail in 
the Sierra Nevada town of Bridge- 
port, where he paid for his own lodg- 
ing. He was released Aug. 6 to 
resume his motion picture work. 



<P 



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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Monday, Augutt 24, 1987 



11 






Updated system 
for phone bills 
begins this fall 



By The Coltegion Start 

Roommates' squabbles over tele- 
phone bills might be less of a prob- 
lem now due to a new billing system 
implemented in University residence 
halls. 

Students who directly dial long- 
distance calls from dorms must use 
an access code to complete their call. 
But, they may still place credit card 
and collect calls. 

"The code is an access number, not 
a charge card," said Tom Gallagher, 
director of computing and telecom- 
munications activities. "Since it isn't 
a credit card, students won't have to 
pay the higher rate of a credit card." 

The code will identify the caller 
and smooth out the billing process, 
he said. 

"Before, there may have been two 
people per phone in a residence hall, 
which could have created some ques- 
tion about the bill. This system will 
remove any questions," Gallagher 
said. 

Such is not the case for other Kan- 



sas colleges that have adopted diffe- 
rent systems to meet the new policy. 

"Other colleges are forcing their 
students to use credit cards to make 
their calls. We decided not to do that 
and adopted our plan," Gallagher 
said. "They may do something simi- 
lar later on." 

The new system routes calls 
through telecommunications and a 
state wide telephone network. The 
system is the result of a new policy 
set by the Division of Information 
Systems, which makes policies for 
all slate agencies. 

Since most of the calls made on 
campus are within the University, the 
system will allow the college to con- 
tain costs. 

'The system will keep the Univer- 
sity from being vulnerable to the rate 
changes thai Southwestern Bell and 
AT&T make (for on-campus calls)," 
Gallagher said. 

Students living in residence halls 
were previously billed directly from 
Southwestern Bell but now will be 
billed by the University. 



U.S. visit by Gorbachev 'rumor' 



By The Associated Press 

SANTA BARBARA, Calif. — 
Reagan administration officials 
said Sunday they have no reason Lo 
believe a published report that 
Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev 
plans a September meeting with the 
president. 

The Los A ngcles Times reported 



in its Sunday editions that Soviet 
officials have told the United States 
that Gorbachev plans to visit New 
York in late September to attend the 
U.N. General Assembly and then 
go to Washington to meet with 
Reagan. 

The Times attributed its informa- 
tion to "informed officials," who 
spoke on the condition of anonymi- 



Landfill 

■ CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 
landfill closure plan to KDHE. 

While KDHE mandated the sub- 
mission of closure plans in its July 17 
order, those plans should have been 
submitted years ago, said Peter Rom- 
bold, attorney for the Mochlman 
Bottoms residents. According to 
Kansas statutes, "Persons desiring to 
obtain a permit shall file a site clo- 
sure plan at the time a permit appli- 
cation is submitted." 

KDHE issued a Solid Waste Dis- 
posal Permii to Riley County in June 
1976 to operate the landfill. 

But a closure plan was never sub- 



mitted to KDHE, and the department 
continued to license the landfill 
annually without requiring a closure 
plan, Harden said. 

"There's never been any closure 
plan anywhere in the state," he said. 

As for a new disposal system, 
Harden said the main alternatives the 
county will consider will involve 
recycling or incinerating the waste. 
Or, he said, there is a "minute possi- 
bility" the county may open another 
landfill. 

"It's a difficult choice," he said. 
"If we bury the waste, we put the 
groundwater at risk. If we bum it, we 
put the atmosphere at risk." 

Another consideration in selecting 
a disposal method is cost. Harden 



Minnesota veteran 
compiles directory 



By The Associated Press 

FREEPORT, Minn. Ron 

McGinnis pulled his semitrailer 
truck into St. Louis, hometown of an 
old Vietnam war buddy. He found a 
motel, a beer and a phone book, but 
he couldn't find Jim Boetlcher. 

"I must have called every Boetl- 
cher in the St. Louis phone book. 
And, of all names, wouldn't you 
know his wife's was Smith. So I 
didn't even try." 

Bui McGinnis, 39, of Frecport, 
didn't give up his search for Boetl- 
cher and his other Army buddies. In 
fact, he's not only looking for his 
own buddies, but everybody else's as 
well. 

McGinnis wants to put together a 
directory of veterans' addresses and 
phone numbers. That way vets like 
him Jould keep in touch with each 
other. 

'There's a bond there. Wc share 
something thai others will never 
know," he said. 

McGinnis formed Veteran's 
Directory Inc. in January. He quit his 
trucking job about three months later 
to devote time to the project. 



He works out of an office in the 
back of his house, where he spends 
his days making telephone calls, 
writing letters and preparing news 
releases. 

"We're looking for recognition at 
this point We're here. We're not 
going to give up," he said. 

The "wc" is McGinnis and five or 
six volunteers, whom he calls his 
board of directors. He admits he's the 
only full-time worker, and an unpaid 
one at that, running the operation on 
donations. 

Some vets have sent back the 
information needed to get their 
names in ihe directory, McGinnis 
keeps them filed by stale in his desk 
drawer. Before he's finished, he'll 
probably fill several filing cabinets. 

He estimates there are 2.5 million 
vets in the American Le gion alone. 
And then ffiftroe UW«uuscd?ffiP* 
and civilian war vels he'd like lo 
include in ihc book. 

"A lot of people don't realize how 
many civilians served in the war. 1 
remember the pilot and stewardesses 
on the plane thai took us home. 
(Enemy troops) were bombing the 
airfield when ihcy landed." 



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CAREER PLANNING & PLACEMENT 

ORIENTATION SESSIONS FOR 

DEGREE CANDIDATES 

START AUGUST 27, 1987 

Details at Holtz Hall 

See Collegian Campus Bulletin entries each day and 
posting for other seminars throughout the 
semester. 



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end shared pay features. 

SHARED PAY 
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students assuming reasonable 
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Students share in the cost of 

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for a single contract and $500 

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shared pay maximum has been 

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2314 Anderson. Suite 205 
Manhattan. Kansas 66502 




ty. It did not say whether ihcy were 
U.S. or Soviet officials. 

An administration official, in 
Santa Barbara while the president 
vacations at his ranch north of here, 
said he knew nothing about any 
such visit, 

A U.S. official in Washington, 
also speaking on condition of 
anonymity, called the story 



"implausible." 

The president's national security 
adviser, Frank C. Carlucci, was 
away from Santa Barbara and could 
not immediately be reached. Before 
leaving, however, he told Cable 
News Network that he had spent 
Saturday wilh Secretary of State 
George P. Shullz and Shulu: said 
nothing about such a visit. 



said. An incineration system could 
cost several million dollars to install, 
while a conventional landfill costs 
only a few hundred thousand dollars. 

Funds for the new site will prob- 
ably come from a bond issuance, and 
could be "the largest bonded inde- 
btedness expenditure the county has 
made," Harden said. 

So far, commissioners have 
budgeted between $500,000 and 
$600,000 for the landfill project in 
1988, he said. 

Regardless of which disposal 
method is selected. Harden said, the 
site will likely be a regional one and 
could include Junction City and Fort 
Riley. 

Until the decisions are made, how- 



ever, it's business as usual at the 
landfill. 

"1 imagine we'll be out at the land- 
fill until the day before the new place 
opens," Harden said, adding thai 135 
tons of trash arc dumped daily at the 
landfill. 

"A landfill messing up the 
groundwater is bad," he said. "But 
not as bad as having no place lo 
dump the trash," 



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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN. Monday, Augmt 24, 1987 




Suff/Andy Nelion 



Jeanette Suelter, freshman in general, pulls her hands awa, from a ^^SlSSS!^ ^ *"** 
in a levitalion demonstration Saturday night during h,s show in McCain Auditorium. 



Concert 

■ CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 

said. 

The band formed three years ago 
and receives most of its air play from 
college radio stations, he said, adding 
the band will be completing its first 
independent album release this fall. 

The second band. The Elvis 
Brothers, returned to Manhattan after 
a two-year absence. The four- 
member band from Champaign, 111.. 
formerly played at Mannequin's in 
Aggieville. 

A drummer for the band described 
their music as "real cool pop-type 

stuff. 

"We've been playing together for 
about five yean now," he said. 
"When we started, we played a lot of 
old rock, which is the reason we used 
'Elvis* in our name. Now we do 
mostly our own music." 

The Welcome Back Concert con- 
cluded a weekend of events for new 
and returning students. A magic 
show featuring mentatist Craig 
Karges in McCain Auditorium and a 
dance in between Seaton Hall am) the 
Union Saturday evening provided 
students a chance to get acquainted 
and have fun in a non-alcoholic 
atmosphere, said Kelli Nichols, 
program coordinator for the Depart- 
ment of Housing. 

'The dance and the magic show 
went really well," she said. "We had 
about 650 people at the magic show 
and about 1,000 to 1,100 people at 
the dance. 



Police battle riots 
after worker dies 
in S. Korean clash 



Accidents claim 2 li 



By The Associated Press 

Two people died in weekend traff- 
ic accidents on Kansas roads this 
weekend, including a Manhattan 
man who was riding in a pickup truck 
involved in a two-truck accident ear- 
ly Sunday. 

Riley County police said the vic- 
tim, James G. Plata, 40, was a pas- 
senger in a truck driving south on 
U.S. 24 near Manhattan when 
another pickup traveling north 
swerved into the southbound lane. 

Rcbckah Plata, who was driving 
the Plata car, attempted to avoid the 
oncoming car but was broadsided, 
police said. The accident occurred 



about 3:45 a.m. Sunday. 

The driver of the northbound 
truck, who was in custody Sunday, 
was to be charged with aggravated 
vehicular homicide, driving while 
under the influence, transporting an 
open container of alcohol and driving 
left of center, according to a state- 
ment released by Capt. Nick Edvy. 

Frank Linden, 22, of Braman, 
Oklahoma, died Friday night in a 
two-car wreck on U.S. 166 east of 
South Haven, according to the Sum- 
ner County sheriffs department. 

The car Linden was driving 
crossed the center line and hit 
another car head on, officers said. 



Plane 



■ CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 

the crash to the nationwide outpour- 
ing of support after the explosion of 
the space shulde Challenger. 

'These feelings were best express- 
ed in the poignant statement from 
one of the rescuers at the crash site, 
who found little Cecilia Cichan," 
O'Hair said. "He said, 'She will nev- 
er know me, but I will know and 
remember her the rest of my life.'" 

The Ann Arbor hospital has 



received more than $16,000 in dona- 
tions for Cecilia. A 5-year-old girl 
from Auburn. Mass., raised about 
S400 selling Kool-Aid over the 
weekend to buy Cecilia a present. 

The last wreckage of the McDon- 
nell Douglas MD-80 aircraft was 
removed Saturday from the crash site 
near the intersection of Interstate 94 
and Middle belt Road at the edge of 
the airport. 

Before Middlebelt Road is opened 
later this week, workers will rcsccd a 
scorched embankment and repair the 
road surface. 



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By The Associated Press 

SEOUL, South Korea — Riot 
police on Sunday fought hundreds of 
striking shipyard workers protesting 
the death of a fellow worker in a pre- 
vious clash, news reports said. A 
policeman was reported seriously 
injured. 

The death on Saturday of 22-year- 
old Lee Suk-kyu was the first in a 
month of national labor turmoil. 

A Labor Ministry official said 
meanwhile thai for the first lime, the 
number of labor disputes settled Sun- 
day exceeded the number of new dis- 
putes. But he said disputes at 494 
workplaces still affected hundreds of 
thousands of workers. 

The official would not allow use of 
his name. 

Bus service in Seoul returned 
almost to normal after a partial walk- 
out Saturday, bul foreign and domes- 
tic flights at Seoul's airport were 
delayed Sunday as 500 ground work- 
ers walked out for the second conse- 
cutive day. 

In Koje on the southern coast, the 
police officer was badly hurt in a 
clash with shipyard workers when he 
tried to persuade about 500 workers 
to release Lee's body for an autopsy 
in another hospital with better facili- 
ties, news reports said. 



The workers were keeping watch 
over lite body al a hospital mortuary. 
They had scaled off the mortuary 
with welding torches because they 
feared that police might try to forcib- 
ly take away Lee's body to destroy 
evidence, news reports said. 

Lcc worked at the struck shipyard, 
Daewoo Shipbuilding and Machin- 
ery Ltd. He was reported to have 
been hit by fragments of a tear gas 
canister in a clash between about 
3,000 workers and 1,300 police in 
which two dozen other workers suf- 
fered minor injuries. 

The policeman reported injured 
Sunday was not identified. 

About 400 policemen were at the 
scene. No arrests were reported. 

About a mile away, police fired 
tear gas to prevent 1,000 workers 
from marching out of the Daewoo 
shipyard. South Korea's second big- 
gest, after a one-hour protest rally, 
the slate television KBS reported. 

A union leader was quoted as say- 
ing earlier that Daewoo workers 
would avoid violent protests until 
after Lee's funeral, tentatively set for 
Wednesday. 

No arrests or injuries were 
reported in the 30-minutc clash. 

Daewoo workers rioted Saturday 
after talks on higher wages and bene- 
fits broke down. 



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Kansas State Collegian ■ Monday, August 24, 1987 ■ Page 13 



Swim adjusts to team, expectations 




By Tom Morris 

Sports Writer 



One of 18 junior 

attack this season 
touchdowns last 



Surf/Sieve Woi|tJ-i 



college transfers signed. Quarterback Gary Swim is the Wildcats* hope Tor a renewed air 
. A transfer from Snow Community College in Utah, Swim passed for over 1 ,600 yards and 1 1 
year. 



It's not easy being the new kid on 
ihc block. Just ask Gary Swim, the 
highly -touted transfer from Snow 
Community College in Utah and K- 
Siatc's No. 1 quarterback this season. 

Of the 18 junior college players 
signed by head football coach Stan 
Parrish this year. Swim was K- 
Statc's biggest prize. And even 
(hough he has has yci to play a down 
in a Wildcat uniform, Swim is receiv- 
ing more media attention for a K- 
Slatc quarterback since Darrcll Dick- 
ey led the 'Cats to an Independence 
Bowl appearance in 1982. 

With Swim's arrival came a myr- 
iad of hopes that his ability, which 
accounted for more than 1 .600 yards 
and 1 1 touchdowns in an injury- 
Shortened season at Snow last year, 
would elevate the "Air Parrish" pass- 
ing attack which simply fluttered lasi 
year. 

Bui even with his vaunted reputa- 
tion — while at Snow, Swim was 
compared to such former standouts 
as David Archer and Mike Norscth, 
who each made the transfer to a Big 
Eight Conference school — Swim 
said the transfer wasn't an easy one. 

"It's been a learning experience," 
he said. 

"When (the transfers) came in 
here, some of the players looked at us 
and told us Coach Parrish had 
already granted starting positions 
and sturf like that. We had to pull 
together, realize our juco days were 
over and work just as hard or harder 
than anybody else." 

Swim, though, has an aura of con- 
fidence. When asked about the com- 
parisons to Archer and Norscth, the 
6-foot-3, 180-pound junior insists, 
"I'm my own type of player." He 
quickly earned the starting nod and 
the respect of his teammates with his 
strong arm and ability to read 
defenses and had an impressive 
showing (10 of 14. 87 yards) in the 
annual Alumni -Vanity scrimmage 
last spring. 

"We've definitely upgraded the 
position," said Parrish who, in addi- 
tion to head coaching, will be in 
charge of the quarterbacks this sea- 
son. "We knew that during recruiting 
without solidifying that position, 



we're not going to be a winner here." 
After surviving the initial transfer 
shock. Swim now has to contend that 
"Air Parrish" will be somewhat 
grounded this season in favor of a 
strong running corps. Parrish said 
Thursday he will favor the running 
game this season — which includes 
the likes of record-setting tailback 
Tony Jordan and the return of a 
healthy Maurice Henry — in an 
effort to improve the Wildcats' total 
offense, which finished seventh in 
the Big Eight last season. 



"It's been a learning 
experience." 

— Gary $wim 

Still. Swim is optimistic about his 
chances to test his skill against a 
strong non-conference schedule and 
the seven Big Eight opponents. 

"When I came here I knew what 
Tony Jordan was all about and I'm 
not disappointed that Coach Parrish 
has said he is going to 'ground' his 
passing attack," Swim said. "We're 
still going to throw the ball 25 to 30 
times a game, which is quite a bit for 
Big Eight hall. 

"And when teams scout us and 
start to key off Jordan, it will leave 
the passing attack open," he added. 

Besides the chance to be the No. I 
quarterback on what was a pass- 
oriented team. Swim was also lured 
to K-Sialc because of the emphasis 
Parrish placed on the recrruiting of 
junior college players. 

If asked by a senior athlete in high 
school. Swim said he would suggest 
they go to a junior college for one or 
two years to hone their skills. 

"A lot of people think a junior col- 
lege is just full of dumb athletes who 
don't have good GPAs but that isn't 
the case," he said. 

"I would say a junior college is the 
right way to go because they could 
get playing time, have more indivi- 
dual instruction and can then know 
what they're doing when they get to 
the major-college level." 

Swim has noticed a difference 
between junior college and Division 
I ball — as far as receivers arc 
conccrcnd. 

"Here the receivers are quicker 



and a lot smarter whereas in juco uV\ 
were slower and more of a position 
type player." 

One question to be answered is K 
Stale's offensive line. With the loss 
of three starters, will the line have in- 
ability to handle the onslaught ul 
defensive rushing dial harried star 
tcrs Randy Williams and Tim Han 
son last season? Swim said he isn'i 
concerned about his protection in th>, 
pocket. 

"I feel safe behind this line," Swim 
said. "They all came baek this sum 
mcr 20-plus pounds heavier 
there's a wall in front of me. Plus, I 
have the ability to move if I have it. 
move." 

Swim chose K-Statc over Illinois, 
Utah Slate and Weber Stale, ami 
knows what it's like lo be a winner 
and a loser. His high school team 
wcnl 0-8 his senior season. And after 
a hardship season at Snow, Swim 
guided the learn in an 11*0 record ami 
a national title. 

To bo a winner. Swim realizes the 
team has to cooperate to reach its 
goals. Even though there was greal 
compel ilinn for the starting job lasi 
spring with returning senior Tim 
Hanson and three additional quality 
quarterbacks on the roster. Swim 
said there is no animosity between 
them. 

"We get along real well. We know 
what we have lo do. which includes 
working wiih each oilier lo make 
each other belter." 

Sometimes great quarterbacks are 
made — sometimes they are horn lo 
be great. Swim's opportunity in 
become a field general eould be attri- 
buted to lady luck. He started at 
receiver his junior year in high 
school and may have stayed there il 
Ins coach wouldn't have known 
about his passing ability from a puni. 
pass and kick competition when he 
was a sophomore. 

What might be a godsend for ihe 
'Cat passing attack this year ma\ 
never have happened il Swim had 
received basketball offers after his 
senior season in high school. That's 
right — his first love was the sport 
founded by James Naismiin. 

If K-Stale is successful through 
the air this season, gridiron fans can 
be thankful that basketball coach Lon 
Krugcr didn't gel to Swim first. 



Summer sports 
memories linger 



For the third year in a row, I 
decided to spend the summer in Man- 
hattan. If you haven't yet exper- 
ienced spending a summer at K- 
State, I recommend it. 

Working on the Collegian this 
summer gave me a first-hand oppor- 
tunity to find out something new 
about summer life in the Little Apple. 

Since you didn't get lo read the 
Collegian over the summer, I'll try lo 
update you on a few summer tidbits 
you may not have caught in your 
hometown newspaper. 

■ The K-Statc Crew made excel- 
lent showings at the Chicago Sprint 
regatta (where the men's varsity took 
the championship) and at the Gate- 
way regatta in St, Louis. After excel- 
lent spring and summer seasons, 
crew should have a strong silver 
anniversary season, 

■ Norris Coleman was picked 38th 
in the National Basketball Associa- 
tion draft by the struggling Los 
Angeles Clippers. He was picked in 
the second round, but was the fourth 
pick of the Clippers. From K- State: 
good luck and goodbye, Norris. It's 
been a long road, huh? 

■ On another positive basketball 
note, K-State forward Mitch Rich- 
mond was selected to play on the 
U.S. team in the World University 
games. Richmond was selected as 
one of 12 amateur players from a 
field of 20 finalists from around the 
country. That should have been an 
awesome learning experience for an 
already-awesome player. 

■ On a less positive note and some- 
thing that's noi fun to write about or 
even mention, a motorcycle gang 
ripped a page out of our basketball 
history book by stabbing lo death for- 
mer K-Statc basketball standout Jari 
Wills, Wills played for the Wildcats 
during the '78-*80 seasons and later 
served as a graduate coaching assis- 
tant under Jack Hartman. The 
tragedy involved Wills previously 




Molitor taking hitting streak in stride 



By The Associated Press 

Paul Molitor is aware that he 
may never pass this way again as he 
climbs baseball's ladder of longest 
hilling streaks. 

The Milwaukee Brewers' desig- 
nated hitler extended his streak to 
38 games Sunday in a 10-5 victory 
over the Kansas City Royals and 
then looked forward to Monday, a 
day off. 

"It's nicer the higher you go 



naturally," said Molitor, admitting 
dial there is not much difference 
between 37 and 38 games. 

"But when you talk about in 
comparison to what the record is 
and everything else, it's really not 
that significant." 

"Thirty eight, 1 was thinking 
about that today. That's a long time, 
you know, and those numbers still 
seem far away out there, I'm sull 
trying to take that one game at a 
time approach." 



Molitor lined a fifth- inning 
single off Charlie Lcibrandt to keep 
the streak going and the Brewers 
also got big efforts from Greg 
Brock and Bill Schroeder, who had 
four hits and three runs batted in 
apiece. 

The Brewers, who had 17 hits 
Sunday, now take a day off before 
beginning a three- game scries with 
the Cleveland Indians at home. 

"I'm really looking forward lo a 
day off. We've had a tough stretch 



since ihc A II -Star break. This will 
only be our second day off. Il will 
be nice to get away from the park 
for a day," Molitor said. 

"I'm going to enjoy a day ai 
heme." 

After going hillcss in his firsi two 
at-bats, Molitor led off the bottom 
of the fifth by lining a Lcibrandt 
slider to left on the first pilch, giv 
ing him the fifth longest streak in 
major- league history. 



breaking up a fight in an Ottawa, 
Kan,, bar and ended ten months later 
when Wills was jumped by the 
bikers. 

■ For the second consecutive year. 
Anne Stadlcr and Jacquc Slruekhofl 
were voted to the GTE/COS I DA 
Academic All-America first team. 
Stadlcr. a fifth- year senior in educa- 
tion, and Struckhoff, a fifth-year 
senior in physical therapy and nutri- 
tion science, both carry 4,0 GPAs. 
That's right; amid the endless prac- 
tice schedule and traveling, neither 
of these athletes has ever received a 
"B" in college. That is excellence in 
its purest form. Applause, applause, 

■ The rugby team played in three 
seven-man tournaments this sum- 
mer, and they performed typically 
well. The rules were basically the 
same for seven guys instead of fif- 
teen, except that some of the chaos 
was cut down and all the players 
were really tired after the games. But 
basically it was just a few less players 
than usual grinding each other into 
ihe grass. You gotta love it, 

■ One other thing happened that I'll 
mention is that Mike Hinkle from the 
Wildcat baseball squad was drafted 
by the St. Louis Cardinals . 

■ Something I won't discuss are the 
scuffed attitudes and the corked feel- 
ings of major league baseball, except 
to say, "Bo, thanks for the 
memories." 



Big Eight downs Czechoslovakia 




Sufi/John Thelmder 

The Big Fight select basketball team lost to the Big 
Eight area alumni Aug. 13 In Ahearn Field House. 



By Staff ond Wire Reports 

After a dismal showing in its debut contest in 
Ahearn Field House on Aug. 13, the Big Eight 
sejeel basketball team made a good showing for 
the conference Friday in the first round of the 
International Tournament being held in Beijing, 
China. 

The team, which is coached by and was 
selected by K-Siate head coach Lon Kruger and 
his staff, lost to a team of K-Statc and Big Eight 
area alumni 89-85 in Manhattan in front of a 
crowd estimated at 2,000 people to kick off its 
campaign. 

The alumni team included former K-Statcrs 
such as Lynn Smith, Kevin Muff, Scott Langton 
and Eddie Elder, but the one who really show- 
cased his latent was Joe Wright. 

Wright went 5 for 6 from beyond the thrcc- 
point line and scored 29 points to lead all scorers 
in only 19 minutes of play. 

After the game, Kruger looked realistically at 
his team's progress after three days of practice. 

"We (the select team) still have a lot of areas 
to work on, but I thought the last 10 minutes of 
the game we played more aggressively. There 
were a lot of signs which were very pleasing. 

"I thought it was a really good game. I 
thought the alumni played hard and did an excel- 
lent job," Kruger said. 

On the opening day of the nine-nation tourna- 
ment, the Big Eight all-stars rallied from an ear- 
ly second half 10- point deficit and defeated the 
Czcchoslovakian national team 74-69. 

Coached by Kruger, the Big Eight team trail- 



ed 40-37 at halflime and were down 47-37 three 
minutes inio the second half. 

But the team took advantage when Czecho- 
slovakia's 7-foot-l center, Jiri Okac, was 
benched with foul trouble, and surged into Ihe 
lead at 56-55 with nine minutes left. 

The score was tied at 68 with 1 'A minutes left 
before Scott Wilkc of Colorado and Archie Mar- 
shall of Kansas made jump shots lo put the 
Americans ahead 72-68. 

Steve Hcnson of K-Statc, who was a favorite 
of the capacity crowd of 1 8, (XX) at Beijing's 
Capital Gymnasium, added two free throws to 
cap the U.S. victory. 

Wilkc led the United States with 15 points, 
followed by Hcnson with 10, Gary Thompkins 
of Iowa Slate and Roycc Jeffries of Oklahoma 
State with nine points each. 

Saturday, the Big Eight team was plagued by 
poor field goal shooting and turnovers in a 74-62 
loss to Poland. 

The team went an ice-cold 38 percent from 
the field and committed 18 turnovers. Wilkc led 
the all-stars again wiih 14 points and Hcnson 
added 12. Kansas' Mark Randall was the only 
other scorer for the Big Eight in double figures 
with 10 points. 

In action Sunday, the Big Eighi learn defeated 
Malaysia 75-60, paced by three players not ing 
in double figures. 

With the victory, the Big Eight select team 
moved its record to 2- 1 . The team will nexi meei 
China in a contest to be played at 3:30 a.m. 
(CDT) Tuesday. 



»«~» - 



. ♦ - — .. , . 



mm 



mm 



14 



KAKSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Mondiy, Augu»l 24, 1987 



First scrimmage prepares team 




Sufi/Andy Nclton 

The K -Slate football team held its first major scrimmage of the season 
Saturday with the first team offense going against the first team 
defense. TOP: Following the scrimmage, the players gathered around 
Head Coach Stan Parrish as he discussed the scrimmage, BOTTOM 
LEFT: Tight end Brent Cotton (48) fights off linebacker Jeff Lowe 
after catching a pass. BOTTOM RIGHT: Wide receiver John Wil- 
liams is congratulated by a teammate after catching a 51-yard touch- 
down pass from quarterback Tim Hanson. 



Cubans 
win gold 

By The Associoted Press 

Victor Mesa's bases-loaded 
single in the eighth inning off 
U.S. relief ace Cris Carpenter 
rallied Cuba to a 13-9 victory 
over the United States Satur- 
day and its fifth consecutive 
Pan American Games baseball 
gold medal. 

Unul Mesa's decisive hit, 
the United States had been 
ahead 9-8 since the fifth 
inning, a lead fashioned on Ed 
Sprague's IcadolT homer. 

The victory avenged the 6-4 
loss to the U.S. team last Satur- 
day on Ty Griffin's two-run, 
Iwo-out homer in the ninth 
inning — a loss thai snapped 
Cuba's 37 -game Pan Am win- 
ning streak. 

This time, Griffin made a 
key error in the eighth inning, 
leading to Cuba's two runs off 
Carpenter. 



Locker room lifts spirits 



By Jeff Rapp 

Sports Editor 



Look what sprang up over the 
summer. 

After a speedy constuction that 
began in early June and was virtually 
completed by August 12, the K-State 
football squad and athletic program 
received a shot in the arm. 

The Wildcats received a brand 
new football locker room and train- 
ing facility, which have been sore 
spots in me program since the build- 
ing of the complex but are now 
among the best in the Big Eight Con- 
ference. In faci, the locker room 
facilities could be the best in the con- 
ference, according to athletic direc- 
tor Larry Travis. 

"I think that we have come into the 
Big Eight Conference with a bang," 
Travis said. "This locker room facili- 
ty will put us in the elite of the con- 
ference, as far as having locker room 
and dressing facilities for our ath- 
letes. I think with the addition of 
facilities such as this one and the 
completion of the Fred Bramlage 
Coliseum (in 1988) there will be no 
better athletic facilities in the 



country. 

The concept of the new locker 
room and training area first surfaced 
at the home of K-Statc president Jon 
Wefald after a recruiting party was 
held there last year, Travis said. 

"We (head coach Stan Parrish, 
Travis and Wefald) talked about 
what we had to do to upgrade and to 
be a viable winner in the Big Eight 
Conference. Dr. Wefald, at that lime, 
decided to do this project. 

"Without his (Wefald's) support, 
we wouldn't be able to get this thing 
moving. Without his foresight and 
his help, we would never have been 
able to get this thing off the ground," 
Travis said. 

Aho, because of the financial 
nature of the completed project, Tra- 
vis had many more thank -you 's to 
make. No money was received from 
the University for the project, as it 
was completed strictly through dona- 
tions of time, money and services. 

The alumni foundation gave the 
athletic department permission to 
raise the $140,000 for the project, 
then major monetary donations were 
made by alumni Fred Bramlage of 
Junction City and Gil Johnson of 



Colorado Springs. Colo., according 
to Travis. He also thanked several 
local contractors and businessmen 
for their dona lions of time and mater- 
ials to raise the structure. 

In addition to a few donations 
from parents of the players, Travis 
cited Dot and Virgil Lundbcrg of 
Sal ma as the donors of over half the 
money needed for the project Virgil 
was a K-State football player in 
1929. His shoulder pads and helmet 
from that year will be on display in 
the locker room, Travis said. 

'These people, through their gift, 
have made this facility possible, and 
this facility will be known as the 
Lundbcrg Locker Room. This facili- 
ty will be something that the young 
men and women who function and 
work here will be able to look at with 
pride," Travis said. 

Parrish said the locker rooms have 
created a brighter atmosphere for the 
players and coaching staff. 

'The old locker rooms were dingy 
and dark a real loser's heaven. But 
this new facility is among the top in 
the conference. It will really help us 
in recruiting," Parrish said. 



Sooners picked 
preseason No. 1 



By The Associated Press 

For Oklahoma football coach Bar- 
ry Swit/cr, having one of his teams 
selected No. 1 in the preseason is no 
big deal. And he treats it that way. 

"I don't really care. It doesn't 
make any difference," Switzcr said. 
"We have been selected preseason 
No. 1 many, many times. We've won 
it when we've been selected, and 
we've finished high." 

The Sooners were picked by an 
overwhelming margin over Big 
Eight rival Nebraska in The Asso- 
ciated Press poll released Saturday. It 
is the third straight year Oklahoma 
has been the preseason No. 1 choice, 
and the sixth lime in Swiucr's 15 
years as head coach. 

It's only the fourth time since the 
AP began a preseason poll in 1950 
that two teams from the same confer- 
ence were ranked 1-2. 

Iowa and Ohio State of the Big 
Ten were 1-2 in the 1961 preseason 
poll, Nebraska and Colorado of the 
Big Eight held the top two spots in 
1972, and Nebraska and Oklahoma 
led the way in 1983. 

Defending national champion 
Pcnn State is No. 1 1 in this year's 
balloting. 

Oklahoma received 55 of 60 first- 
place votes and 1,193 of a possible 
1,200 points from a nationwide panel 
of sports writers and sportscastcrs. 
The Sooners finished third last year 
after winning the national champion- 
ship in 1985. 

Oklahoma also won national 
championships in 1956, 1974 and 
1975 after being picked No. 1 in the 
preseason poll. The Sooners also 
were the preseason choice in 1957 
and 1977, but finished fourth and 
seventh, respectively. 

The only other teams to win the 
national championship after starting 
out No. 1 were Tennessee in 1951, 
Michigan State in 1952 and Alabama 
in 1978. 



Eight starters from an offensive 
unit that averaged more than 40 
points per game in 1986 return this 
year. Included are four of five offen- 
sive lineman, who make up what 
Swit/cr says is the best group in 
school history, along with quarter- 
back Jamelle Holieway and All- 
America tight end Keith Jackson. 

Seven starters return on defense, 
although Switzer said he is con- 
cerned about finding solid defensive 
tackles. 

"The secondary and the lincback- 
ing corns are good, but we have no 
depth at linebacker. The defensive 
tackles are the key. We've got to find 
some players there and we've got 
nobody who's ever played," he said. 

Nebraska, which finished fifth last 
year, received three first-place votes 
and 1,005 points. UCLA, No. 14 in 
last year's final poll, is third with one 
first-place vote and 935 points. The 
other first-place ballot went to Pcnn 
State. 

Ohio State, the seventh-place 
finisher a year ago, is fourth with 906 
points. Auburn, No. 6 last year, is 
fifth with 835. 

LSU, which ended 1986 as No. 10, 
is sixth with 789 points, followed by 
Michigan with 754. The Wolverines 
wound up eighth last year. 

The preseason No. 8 team is Flori- 
da State, which didn't make the final 
Top Twenty last year. The Scminolcs 
received 723 points. 

Clemson is ninth with 682 points 
after finishing 17th last year. Miami 
of Florida, runncrup to Penn Slate in 
1986 after losing to the Nittany Lions 
14-10 in the Fiesta Bowl, rounds out 
the preseason Top Ten with 676 
points. 

The Second Ten consists of Pcnn 
State, Arkansas, Washington, Arizo- 
na Slate, Texas A&M, Iowa, Tennes- 
see, Notre Dame, Southern Califor- 
nia and a lie for 20th between Florida 
and Georgia, 



Sports Briefly 



Surcharge no longer necessary 

TOPEKA — If Kansas colleges and universities admit senior 
citizens to athletic events without the sale of a ticket they do 
not have to assess 25-ccnl surcharge to those admissions, Attor- 
ney General -Robert T. Stephan held in a recent opinion. 

Coach schedules team tryout 

Any K-State students interested in trying out for the baseball 
team should to attend a meeting at 4 p.m. today at Frank 
Myers Field. Coach Mike Clark said there is no need to bring 
baseball equipment because this is an informational meeting. 
Actual tryouts will be held Aug. 31. For more information, call 
532-6910. 

Golf team tryouts planned 

An informational meeting for students interested in trying out 
for the men's or women's golf teams coached by Rob Sedorcck 
has been set for 7:30 p.m., Aug. 31, in Ahcam Field House 
Actual tryouts will be held Sept. 1 at Rolling Meadows Golf 
Course in Junction City. 

Volleyball tryouts today 

Tryouts for the K-State women's volleyball team will be held 
today at 3 p.m. in Ahcam Field House and are open to any 
female enrolled in a full schedule at K-State. Those wishing to 
participate should be dressed in appropriate practice clothing. 
For more information, contact head coach Scott Nelson at 
532-5935. 



Here's hoping for a post-season feast 



Stan Parrish and I have a dinner dale Satur- 
day, Nov, 21. 

We'll either be dining on a rattier large 
plate of crow washed down with a cheap 
bolUe of Welch's Sparkling Grape Juice, or 
we'll be sipping vintage Dom Perignon while 
enjoying a succulent cut of prime rib. 

What happens over the next three months 
will determine whether the K-State football 
coach and I, always the eternal optimist, will 
enjoy that late November outing or noL 

Parrish, who enters his second season as 
the Wildcat head man with a team that is 
arguably bigger, faster and stronger than any 
other ever assembled at this University, is 
looking for good things from his 1 987 squad. 

Austin Peay State, the opening day oppo- 
nent, and Kansas, the arch-rival Parents* Day 
foe, are considered by Parrish to be to teams 
that his squad must defeat if it's to have any 
hope of making the 1987 campaign anything 
but a carbon copy of the 2-9 1986 effort, 

Parrish won't likely admit it up front, but 
he has to be feeling fairly confident that those 
wins will come. Two wins, however, won't 
buy a team respect. Not in a conference that 
boasts the Nos. 1 and 2 teams in the Asso- 
ciated Press' pre-season rankings (Oklahoma 
and Nebraska), and two other teams (Color- 
ado and Oklahoma State) that received votes 
in that same poll. 

No, the Wildcat coach has got to feel it is 
imperative thai his team win each of its three 
home non-conference games — not just the 



first one against Austin Peay State. 

Once again, Parrish may not admit it, but 
wins over Army and Tulsa have to be consid- 
ered a good possibility in the mind of a coach 
that contends his team is much improved over 
the unit he inherited in December 1985. 

With a possible four wins on the board, 
Parrish looks to the games against Missouri, 
Oklahoma State, Iowa State and Colorado as 
opportunities to take two more wins (and pos- 
sibly post an upset win in another) and finish 
the year with a record above the .500 mark. 

Before you start choking on your breakfast 
or break out laughing so hard that you disrupt 
your first lecture class, let me say, for the 
God-only-knows umpteenth time, that I feel 
this might be the year K-State can help its 
fans forget about all the pain they've endured 
over the last several years. 

I' vc cither lost a great many of you by now, 
or I've hopefully peaked your interest. Why 
do I find myself agreeing with Parrish that a 
team that finished 2-9 last season is instantly 
good enough to triple that win total in 1 987? 
Good question. And one that deserves some 
good answers. 

I've been at K-State since the 1982 season. 
That year, for those youngsters reading, was 
the first and only year that a K-State team 
went to a bow) game. Although the team 
looked less than impressive in dropping the 
Independence Bowl contest to Wisconsin, 
the season provided K-State fans with a dose 
of euphoria tbey hadn't experienced before 



Svobodo on Sports 



DAVID 
SVOBODA 




SportsMonday 
Columnist 



— and most assuredly haven't since 

Until now. 

A team that wants to be a consistent winner 
can't win without several key ingredients, 
among them a balanced offensive attack, a 
physical defense and a strong special teams 
unit K-State now has all three for the first 
time in recent memory. 

Tailback Tony Jordan, who Parrish touts 
as one of the top players at his position in (he 
country, leads the offensive attack. But don't 
think for a minute that he's the only diamond 
among several other unimpressive old rocks. 

The quarterback battle, which in past years 
has consisted of a tough choice between the 
lesser of two or three evils, has been an 
extremely competitive one in fall drills. Gary 
Swim, the No. 1 man at the position, and Tim 
Hanson, the No. 2 signal-caller, are both cap- 
able of keeping opposing defenses from key- 
ing entirely on Jordan. 



Although Swim, by Parrish 's admission, 
lacked rhythm in Saturday's scrimmage at 
KSU Stadium, he has the size and throwing 
arm found on most legitimate pro quarter- 
back prospects. He hasn't delivered yet, but 
here's betting that he does. 

And Hanson, who threw a 5 1 -yard scoring 
strike to John Williams in the scrimmage, 
gives the Wildcats something else they 
haven't had as of late — a legitimate backup 
quarterback. 

On the defensive side, the line hacking 
corps and the secondary arc the strong points 
of a unit that is basically the same one that 
took the field for the Wildcats in 1986. 

Senior leadership, most notably that pro- 
vided by linebackers Mutt Wallerstedt and 
David Wallace and defensive back Brad 
Lambert, makes the defense that much 
suongcr. 

Anyone who watched Saturday's scrim- 
mage or has seen the Wildcats in practice this 
fall has no doubt seen a few fights — yes, 
legitimate fights — between the offensive 
and defensive units. Wallace was found on 
the bottom of one such group discussion 
Saturday, and he's likely to be in on a few 
more before the season ends. 

Thai's the difference in this team and those 
of past years here — they may fight in prac 
ticc, but they're doing it because a healthy 
desire to win is motivating them. This team 
genuinely believes in each other and the 
fights in practice are nothing more than a way 



of expending the energy necessary to reach 
the intensity level it takes to become great. 

And as Frank Gansz's Kansas City Chiefs 
special teams unit showed one year ago, a 
strong kicking game can also separate a bowl 
contender from an also-ran. 

Mark Porter, who returns for his third year 
handling placements for the Wildcats, and 
Ken Olson, who was ranked among the lop 
five juco punters in the nation at American 
River (Calif.) Community College one year 
ago, lead a strong kicking corps. 

To bring all of these components together 
into a team that can win requires strong lead- 
ership, and Parrish has taken a much more 
visible and vocal role in the preparation pro- 
cess this off-season. That, maybe more than 
anything, will insure the success of this team. 

Stan Parrish has been a winner in every 
year he's been a head coach except one... and 
we don't have to let our minds wander too far 
to figure out when that was. 

We should, however, let our minds wander 
and think about what it would feel like to sup- 
port a winner. 

Wins over Austin Peay State, Army, Tulsa, 
Missouri, Kansas and Iowa State arc possi- 
ble, and I'm betting on them. Toss in an upset 
over either Oklahoma State or Colorado, and 
K- State fans would have a real reason to riot. 

And Stan Parrish and I would finally get to 
cat some prime rib. I'm tired of eating crow, 
and Parrish has never had to. Dom Perignon 
for everyone. 



—^ 



■MM 



-»» wiHii ■'■! Admm* 



W> MI W . 



""i 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Monday, AuguH 24, 1987 



IS 



J 



Study: Farming may be most deadly 






By The Associoted Press 

MADISON, Wis, — Those who 
make a living oft the land also stand a 
high chance of dying from it, a 
researcher says. 

University of Wisconsin research- 
er Roger Tormochlcn said he 
believes farming may be the most 
hazardous occupation of all because 
it also kills children. 

Statistics show coal mining is the 
only occupation in the United States 
more dangerous than farming, which 
kilts 1 ,600 people a year nationwide. 

Last year, there were 67 farm 
deaths in Wisconsin, Thirteen of the 
victims were younger than age 15; 
five were 4 years old or younger. 

"Statistics thai measure fatalities 
in different industries don't count 
children under 14," Tormochlcn 
said. "If you count those, farming 
may be the most hazardous industry 
in the country. They don't let child- 
ren work." 

Children do drive tractors, the 
most frequent cause of fatal farm 
accidents in all age groups, he said. 

According to Tormochlcn, 247 
children under the age of 15 were 
killed in farm accidents between 
1970 and 1984, and 100 died after 
being run over or crushed by a 
tractor. 

Younger victims were often pas- 




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scngcrs or standing behind a wheel, 
while older children were often driv- 
ing the tractor that killed Ihcm, he 
said. 

In Stoughton last month, separate 
tractor accidents killed two young 
boys. David Augustine, 3, was run 
over by a manure spreader being 
pulled by a tractor, while James 
Byers, 8, died when a tractor ran over 
him. 

Farm children, like their parents, 
often fall victim to the myriad of 
machines that harvest, bale, spread 



and transport, but which arcalsocap- 
ablc of crushing, mangling o.' 
suffocating. 

A recent stale study showed one in 
four Wisconsin farm families is like- 
ly to have an injury accident during a 
given year — a total of 20,000 farm 
injuries annually in die state. 

Farm officials say one of the most 
dangerous pieces of farm machinery 
other than a tractor is its attached 
power take-off shaft (PTO), which 
rotates at speeds up to 1,000 revolu- 
tions per minute and can tear off 



clothes, skin and limbs. 

A national study conducted by 
Frederick Rivara at the University of 
Tennessee found that more than half 
of children involved in fatal farm 
accidents die without ever reaching a 
physician. Only 7.4 percent live long 
enough to be admitted to a hospital. 

The same is often true for their 
parents, Tormochlen said, especially 
in cases when farmers try to lake on a 
task alone that is too much for one 
person. 

'There's no one around to help 



litem do it, so they do it alone. And if 
there's an accident, the injured per- 
son may lie for hours before getting 
help, making the injury even more 
severe or fatal," he said. 

Tormochlcn travels the state giv- 
ing lectures on farm safety to adults 
and children. He said farm parents, 
and sometimes their children, usual- 
ly nod knowingly when he uses a toy 
tractor to demonstrate that farm trac- 
tors pulling a heavy load with a hitch 
mounted too high will tip over. 

Most farm injuries, whether fatal 



or not, aren't due to ignorance on the 
pan of farmers, but are caused by 
carelessness, fatigue, or, in the case 
of children, lack of experience, Tor- 
mochlcn said. 



Quit smoking. 







American Heart 
Association 

WERE FIGHTING FOR 
VOURUFE 



•20 minute wait after shot 
to assure no allergic 
reaction 



LAFENE ALLERGY CLINIC 



•Room 113 




Before you choose a long distance 
service, take a close look. 




You may be thinking about 
choosing one of the newer 
carriers over AT&T in order to 
save money. 

Think again. 

Since January 1987, AT&T's 
rates have dropped more than 
15% for direct-dialed out-of- 
state calls. So they're lower than 
you probably realize. For infor- 
mation on specific rates, you 
can call us at 1 800 222-0300. 

And AT&T offers clear long 
distance connections, operator 
assistance, 24 -hour customer 
service, and immediate credit 
for wrong numbers. Plus, you 
can use AT&T to call from 
anywhere to anywhere, all over 
the United States and to over 
250 countries, 

You might be surprised at 
how good a value AT&T really 
is. So before you choose a 
long distance company, pick 
up the phone. 



AT&T 

The right choice. 



** ...,—.-. — —•* 






16 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Monday, Augmt 24. 1M7 



Lonetree trial 
remains secret 
with censoring 



By The Associated Prat 

QUANTICO, Va. - - Marine 
Sgt. Clayton Lonetree has been 
tried and convicted of espionage 
and faces life in prison, but gov- 
ernment censorship kepi the publ- 
ic ignorant about much of his 
court-martial. 

Lawyers for the former Mos- 
cow embassy guard weren't even 
allowed to ask one witness who he 
was. 

From the moment the trial 
opened July 22 until Lonetree's 
conviction Friday, the proceed- 
ings at Quantico Marine Base 
were time and again closed to the 
public, while CIA and State 
Department attorneys were said to 
be in the courtroom. 

Those agencies declined com- 
ment on their role in the case of 
the first Marine to stand court- 
martial for espionage. Lonetree, 
25, of St. Paul, Minn., was found 
pilty on 1 3 counts, the most seri- 
ous of which alleged he gave CIA 
identities and floor plans of the 
U.S. embassies in Moscow and 
Vienna to the Soviet KGB. 

Authorities said the investiga- 
tion began Dec. 14 ^hen Lonetree 
went to the CIA sMlion chief in 
Vienna and said he had become 
involved with a Soviet agent, 
Aleksiy Yefimov, after falling in 
love with a Soviet translator at the 
Moscow embassy, Violet ta Sanni. 

Sanni had introduced Yefimov 
to Lonetree as her Uncle Sasha, 
investigators said. Loncirce was 
interrogated by the CIA for sever- 
al days in Vienna before being 
taken to London by Navy investi- 
gators who obtained two sworn 
confessions. 

Defense lawyers contended 
that Lonetree was tricked into 
implicating himself, but they were 
unable to get the confessions 
thrown oul They argued that 
Lonetree turned over nothing of 
value and was instead a scapegoat 
in a bungled investigation of spy- 
ing, in the Moscow embassy. 



Reporters covering the trial 
were not allowed into the cour- 
troom or even to stand on the 
sidewalk outside to question peo- 
ple. They were confined to a 
building where they could watch 
on closed-circuit television, 
except when government censors 
turned it off. 

Defense lawyers Michael 
Stuhff and William Kunstler pro- 
tested, saying the censorship was 
imposed to create an illusion that 
important secrets were being dis- 
cussed in a shoddy case. They 
were themselves under a court 
order that prevented them from 
describing what happened during 
censored sessions and from even 
mentioning the CIA. 

They gave journalists a "vague 
idea of what was going on by fre- 
quent references to a "certain 
intelligence agency." 

"This Star Chamber procedure, 
actively orchestrated by the 
anonymous intelligence agency, 
which has a number of its attor- 
neys overseeing all stages of this 
court-martial, has resulted in low- 
ering an unnecessary and delib- 
erately prejudicial secrecy curtain 
over all stages of the proceed- 
ings," a defense statement said. 

Following the verdicL Kunstler 
said: "We shall appeal and we 
shall fight this to the end, and we 
hope, in the end, justice will 
prevail." 

During the court-martial, the 
journalists* two-set television 
hookup did not always work. 
Some reporters noted that the 
technical difficulties never 
occurred while the chief prosecu- 
tor, Marine Maj. David L. Beck, 
was stating his case. 

During what was supposed to 
have been an uncensored portion 
of Kunstlcr's closing argument, 
the sound on both television sets 
and the picture on one cut off 
when Kunstler began talking 
about a State Department offi- 
cial's ties to the Soviet agent who 
took information from Lonetree. 



Slatteiy supports Nicaraguan aid 



By Jim Dietz 

Collegian Reporter 

The United States should use eco- 
nomic aid as a means to pursue a 
peaceful solution to the situation in 
Nicaragua, said Jim Slauery, 2nd 
District congressman. 

Slattery spoke to about 200 people 
Aug. 20 in a speech sponsored by the 
Manhattan Alliance on Central 
America at St. Isidore's Chapel. 

'There is a 50-50 chance of getting 
a peaceful solution in Nicaragua," 
Slattery said. He proposed that a 
"Marshall Plan (be) made available 
to all Central American countries 
which arc moving toward establish- 



ing democracy and protecting basic 
human rights in their countries." 

This Marshall Plan would consist 
of economic assistance similar to 
what was provided in Europe follow- 
ing World War II. 

"This (aid) is the best way for the 
United States to show the people of 
Central America that we care about 
them and we care about their future." 
he said 

"It's in our own best interests to 
invest about 1 percent of our defense 
budget for some kind of economic 
assistance package for Central 
America," Slattery said. This would 
double the amount of economic aid 
now being sent to Central America. 



The presence of Soviet military 
troops and advisers in Nicaragua also 
concerned Slattery. 

He said Nicaraguan Vice Presi- 
dent Sergio Ramirez told him thai if 
the war in Nicaracua was brought to 
an end, the Sandinista government 
would expel the Soviets as well as lift 
the state of emergency, restore free- 
dom of the press and hold free 
elections. 

While in Nicaragua last fall, Slat- 
tery questioned both the Sandinistas 
and the Contras in an effort to deter- 
mine what steps need to be taken to 
set up negotiations between the two. 

He said he now believes negotia- 
tions could take place between the 



Contras, the Nicaraguan government 
and the United States. However, 
despite agreement of the other two 
parlies to meet, it is uncertain 
whether or not the U.S. government 
will agree to negotiate. 

In a letter to President Reagan, 
Slattery oudincd a "framework of a 
bipartisan proposal that could be 
agreed to." It also contained the sig- 
natures of 110 other congressmen. 

The letter proposed an immediate 
cease-fire with negotiations and an 
end to Contra aid. Negotiations 
would take place between the United 
Slates and the Nicaraguan govern- 
ment as well as between the Nicara- 
guan government and the Contras. 



Finished Laundry Service . . . 
just like "Mom's." 

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irdi JP Special 

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304 Fremont 539-3261 



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^Family Planning Inc. 

Absolutely Confidential Abortion Services 



Free Pregnancy Testing 



Immediate appointment, days., weekends., and evening hours. 
3013 E. Central Wichita, KS.. 67214 (316) 688-0107 



THE DINNER 
SPECIAL 

A COMPLETE MEAL 
FOR ONLY $099 




Don t want to cook dinnei 
torught^No problem 1 Come 
to Vista between 4-9pm 
tor oui combo special a 
quarter-pound Vistabuiger 
regular salad bar and 
medium drink— a complete 
meal tor fust $2 99 Bring Ihe 
whole lamlly We make din- 
net easy and economical ' 

($2 99 Dinner Special Served 
Only Between 4-9pm) 

Manhattan • Great Bend * Lawrence * Emporia 
Tbpeka • Wtchlta 1a 



1911 Turtle Creek Bird 



K-State 



Players 



First Semester 

GENERAL AUDITIONS 

August 24, 25, 26 
7 p.m.— Nichols Hall Lobby 

for 

ON THE VERGE 

Sept. 24, 25, 26, 30, Oct. 1, 2, 3 

SOUTH PACIFIC 

Oct. 22, 23, 24 

(Children 7 & up needed 5:30-6:30 on Aug. 24 & 25) 

THE REAL THING 

Nov. 12, 13, 14, 18, 19, 20, 21 

Any and all registered KSL students invited! 

FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL 532-6875 

No preparation needed— Join the Fun! 




539-3830 

Welcome Back Special 

Follow a K-State Tradition. 
When in Aaaieville, pop in for a slice of Falsetto's. 



p 1 _ . 



TWO 



10 Inch Supreme* 
9 toppings on each 
1 FREE quart Pepsi 



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2 toppings on each 

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25 



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Monday Madness 

Buy l Pizza at Regular Price 

& Get One 

of Equal Value FREE 

only on Mondays 



Falsetto's Special 

two 16" 4-topping pizzas 

only 15" 



Buy a 16" Pizza 
and get a 10" 

FREE 



FREE 

Extra Cheese 



Free Delivery 

No Extra Charge for Checks 
We Honor All Local Coupons 



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■■ liinarttf . 



Fraud ordained 



Suit to challenge 
held by minister' 



policy 
s lover 



By The Associated Press 

TOPEKA — A lawsuit seeking to 
nullify an insurance policy on the life 
of Martin K. Anderson, who was 
stain in a field south of Manhattan in 
1983, is scheduled for trial in U.S. 
District Court this week. 

The policy would pay $270,000 in 
benefits to Anderson's four children. 
Their mother, Lorna Anderson 
Eldridge, waived her claim to the 
benefits in November 1986, but 
asked that the money be paid to the 
children. 

Eldridge pleaded guilty in August 
1985 in Lyon County District Court 
to two counts of criminal solicitation 
to murder her husband. She read a 
statement in court describing 
involvement in two plots to kill him, 
but authorities never contended 
either plot resulted in his death. 

But in May of this year, Eldridge, 
who is serving up to 18 years on her 
Lyon County conviction, was 
charged in Geary County with first- 
degree murder in her husband *s 
death. 

The filing of that charge came just 
before the broadcast of "Murder 
Ordained," a CBS-TV mini-series 
portraying a love affair between 



Eldridge and Thomas Bird, the for- 
mer Emporia minister for whom she 
worked as a secretary. 

Bird was convicted of criminal 
solicitation to commit first-degrec 
murder in connection with an unsuc- 
cessful plot against Anderson, and of 
first-degree murder in the death of 
his own wife, Sandra, earlier in 1983. 

The civil suit due for trial inTopc- 
ka before U.S. District Judge Dale 
Saffcls of Kansas City, Kan., was 
filed in March 1985 by New England 
Mutual Life Insurance Co. of Massa- 
chusetts. It was filed against 
Eldridge, both individually and in 
her capacity as mother and natural 
guardian of the children — Lori, 
Julie, Janclle and Jennifer. 

Jury selection is scheduled to start 
Monday afternoon, with the trial 
expected to begin Tuesday. 

Ruling Friday on a pretrial motion 
by Edward Hund, an attorney for 
Eldridge, Judge Saffels said he 
would not bar testimony that might 
link her to her husband's murder. 

The suit alleges that Anderson 
bought a life insurance policy that 
provided $120,000 in death benefits 
and an additional $150,000 if death 
was caused by "accidental bodily 
injury," 



The insurance company contends 
that Eldridge bought the policy 
because she planned to murder her 
husband or "cause him to be mur- 
dered" and that she willfully conce- 
aled the plan from the insurer. 

The company returned premiums 
paid on the policy to Anderson's 
cswte on March 18. 1985. 

The petition asks that the policy be 
declared null and void and that the 
company be allowed to rescind the 
policy because it was "procured by 
fraud and deceit." 

The insurance company also 
claims that it has been damaged by 
Eldridge 's alleged fraud. If the com- 
pany is held liable on the policy, it 
asks that it be awarded an amount 
equal to any payments owed to one or 
all of the plaintiffs. 

In December 1985, a federal judge 
ordered Prudential Insurance Co. to 
pay almost $80,000 to the children as 
benefits from an insurance policy on 
Anderson's life. 

Mrs. Anderson filed a petition in 
January 1986 in U.S. District Court 
in Wichita against the Fireman's 
Fund American Life Insurance Co. 

She had filed on behalf of the 
children. 



16 MONTH 
CALENDARS 

by Far Side 

Recycled Paper 

Hallmark Portal 

THE 



& Gifts 

704 N. Manhattan 
In Aggieville 

Open Evenings & Sundays 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Monday, Auguil 24, 1M7 

f=4ftfelcome International Student! 

to 
Dr. Bob's International Bible Hour 

Bible Discussion— Friendship— Special Events 

Sundays at 9:30 a.m. 

Grace Baptist Church, 2901 Dickens Ave. 
Church Services at 8:30 a.m. and 11:00 a.m. 

Call 776-3058 or 776-7363 if you 
need a friend to bring you. 



17 



KSU 



K-STATE FLYING CLUB < 

LEARN TO FLY 
INTRODUCTORY FLIGHT $15 < 

GROUND SCHOOL INFORMATION { 



• * 



***** 



CLUB AIRCRAFT 

CeMfH 152 -$23/hour, VFR w/lntercom 
Cessna 172 -$31/hour, IFR w/GS. DME, & Intercom 
Cessna 172 -$31 /hour, IFR w/GS & Autopilot 
Piper Arrow -$39/hour, IFR w/GS, DME, & Autopilot 
Cessna 182 -$43/hour, IFR w/GS, DME, & Autopilot 
ATC 610J - $5/hour, IFR Simulator 

Membership available to KSU students, alumni, faculty and staff. 
Hugh Irvm, 539-3128 or 532-6311 for information. 



College courses for career success. 



MARKSMANSHIP AND MILITARY CONCEPTS 
MSCI 104 

BASIC MILITARY SKILLS - MSCI 106 



INTRODUCTION TO THE ARMY - MSCI 204 

For information on these courses, contact the 
Department of Military Science at 532-6754/6755 



ARMY RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING COWS 





RECREATIONAL SERVICES) 



INTRAMURALS 

ENTRIES WILL BE TAKEN IN THE 
ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE MONDAY- 
THURSDAY. AUGUST 24-27 FROM 8 
a.m.-5 p.m. GET YOUR ENTRIES IN 
EARLYt 




Current Sports: Flag Football. Soccer, 1 
on 1 Basketball, Doubles Volleyball, and 
Singles: 3-waIl Handball, 3-wall 
Racquetball, Horseshoes, Tennis and 
Badminton. 

MANAGERS* MEETING 

Wednesday. August 26 4 p.m. 
K-State Union Forum Hall. 



AEROBICS 

6:30-7:15 a.m. 
M.W.F 

4:30-5:15 p.m. 
M,T,W,Th 

5:30-6:15 p.m. 
M,T,W,Th 



SPORT OFFICIALS NEEDED AQUA-FITNESS 



FLAG FOOTBALL: 

THURSDAY. 
AUGUST 27 AT 6:30 
p.m. K-STATE 
UNION. ROOM 213 

SUNDAY. AUGUST 

30 AT 5 p.m. 
INTRAMURAL 
FIELDS/REC 
COMPLEX 

MONDAY. AUGUST 

31 AT 6:30 p.m. 
K-STATE UNION. 
ROOM 213 



SOCCER: 

TUESDAY. SEPTEMBER 1 AT 6:30 
p.m. K-STATE UNION. ROOM 209 

WEDNESDAY. SEPTEMBER 2 AT 
6:30 p.m. K-STATE UNION. ROOM 
209 

MANDATORY ATTENDANCE 
AT ALL MEETINGS. 




6:30-7:15 a.m. 

M.W.F 

7:30-8:15 p.m. 
T.Th 




Our first Lifeline Deadline will be 
Friday. Sept. 4 at 5 p.m. in the 
Administrative Office. Cost $3 



NUTRITIONAL 
COUNSELING 

Deb Ocken will be offering free 
consultations on Mondays from 
3:30 to 5:30. 



JOSTENS 

GOLD RING SALE 

IS COMIN G! 

60OFF«K 

£o off m, 

•20OFFJ0K 



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Rec Services Office 532-6980 Rec Complex 532 6951 

(Court Reservation) 



Outdoor Rental Center 

532-6894 



Rec Check 
532 6000 



Intramural Hotline 
532 6292 



Don't order your ring until you see Jostens selection of ring designs. 
See your Jostens representative for more details. 

JOSTENS 

AMERICA S COLLEGE R I N G ™ 

Date: Aug 24-28 Time: 10am-4pm Deposit Required: $20.00 

Race K- State Union Bookstore 



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11 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Monday. Auqwl «. gg 



Wefald aids library 
by funding serials 



Cosmosphere loses status 



By The Collegian Staff 

A crisis threatening to seriously 
deplete serial subscriptions at Fane II 
Library has been averted — at least 
for this year. 

Earlier this summer. President Jon 
Welald diverted $100,000 from 
other campus funds lo the library to 
cover a $180,188 increase in sub- 
scriptions rates for serials the library 
receives, said Brice Hobrock, dean of 
the library. 

Another $50,000 has been re- 
allocated from funds the library uses 
to purchase books, and $30,000 will 
be recovered through cancellation of 
some serials and duplicate 
subscriptions. 

Most of the increase in subscrip- 
tion rates has been due to a 61 percent 
rise in the cost of foreign subscrip- 



tion rates, he said. The average cost 
ofa foreign subscription in 1986 was 
$135 compared to $217 this year. 

The increase in foreign rates is 
blamed on the deval uation of the dol- 
lar against foreign currency, 
Hobrock said. The library pays for 
subscriptions with U.S. currency, 
and the prices fluctuate with the val- 
ue of the dollar. 

A decline in the number of serials 
could limit research sources since 
most of the foreign journals arc scho- 
larly publications. 

"We hope it will not damage any- 
one's research this year," Hobrock 
said. 

Library officials will determine 
which subscriptions will be elimi- 
nated and whether holdings will be 
kept in Farrcll Library or one of the 
branch libraries, Hobrock said. 



Area banks' profits 
fall by 80 percent, 
KC reserve reports 



Center 
to pay 
taxes 

By The Associated Press 

HUTCHINSON — The Kansas 
Cosmosphere and Discovery Cen- 
ter, one of the state's most popular 
attractions, has been ordered to pay 
back sales taxes because it tost its 
non-profit status in the eyes of the 
Kansas Department of Revenue. 

A year-old ruling excluded the 
Cosmosphere, which features 
space exhibits and astronaut sum- 
mer camps for youngsters among 
its programs. Officials arc unsure 
what impact the sales tax question 



will have on the non-profit center. 

"We lost our exemption some- 
where along the line and were never 
notified we lost it," said Max Ary, 
executive director of the 
Cosmosphere. 

Ary said the space center is likely 
to face added expenditures of 
S10,000toS12,0O0ayearifilcan't 
recover its exemption from the 
sales tax. An audit is under way, 
and the center faces the possibility 
of paying interest and penalties on 
back sales taxes. 

Barbara Clark, a spokeswoman 
for the Department of Revenue, 
said that in 1970 the Legislature 
dropped the existing sales tax 
exemption for religious and non- 
profit groups but retained it for edu- 
cational institutions. 

"I believe there has been some 
misunderstanding since then about 
die applicability of sales tax to 



"We lost our exemption 
somewhere along the 
line and were never noti- 
fied we lost it." 

—Max Ary, 

executive director of the 

Kansas Cosmosphere 

and Discovery Center. 



some organizations," Clark said. 
Several instances of invalid sales 
tax exemptions turn up each year, 
she said. 

On July 1, 1986. the revenue 
department came out with what it 
intended to be a clarifying defini- 
tion of what constitutes an educa- 
tional institution. The definition 
uses terms such as classrooms, cur- 
riculum and ace ditcd teachers. 



"We definitely do not fit that 
ilefiniiion. There's no doubt about 
it," Ary said. "About the only ones 
that do are public and private 
schools. Before, the 'educational 
institution' definition was so broad, 
they were having some problems. 

"The definition now makes it 
very restrictive ... we think it's too 
restrictive," he said. 

Efforts will be made to have the 
Legislature rewrite the "education- 
al institution" definition to include 
such facilities as the Cosmosphere, 
Ary said. Clark said the Department 
of Revenue would have no prob- 
lems if lawmakers decide lodo that. 

"That would be fine with us," she 
said. "We would like there to be 
more definition statutorily." 

In the meantime, the Cosmo- 
sphere has begun paying sales tax 
on all purchases except items 
bought for resale. 



By The Associoled Press 

LINCOLN, Neb. — Profitability 
of banks in the 10th Federal Reserve 
District has fallen more than 80 per- 
cent since 1 980, according to a report 
released by the Federal Reserve 
Bank of Kansas City. 

While banks in Wyoming, 
Nebraska and Colorado led the 
nation as the top three states in return 
on bank assets in 1980, those states 
slipped in 1986 to 48th, 38th and 
43rd places, respectively, the report 
said. 

Since 1980, the district's regional 
economy "has deteriorated substan- 
tially and so has the condition of its 
banks," said Forest Myers, manager 
of the Federal Reserve Bank's policy 
and special projects department. 

The 10th District is comprised of 
Nebraska, Colorado, Kansas, Mis- 
souri, New Mexico, Oklahoma and 
Wyoming. 

For six consecutive years, 10th 
District banks have reported succes- 
sively lower return on average assets. 
In 1986, the return figure was 43 per- 
cent below 1985. 

The earning performance of the 
banks in these states now ranks 
among the poorest in the nation, 
according to the Federal Reserve 
Bank's 1987 Banking Studies 
Annual. 

Earnings results varied widely 
within the seven-state district. 

In the category of smaller banks 
with assets of less than $25 million, 
Nebraska and Missouri were the only 
stales reporting improved return on 
assets performance, the first earnings 
improvement recorded in recent 
years, the report said. 



Nebraska showed a 0.27 percent 
return on earnings compared with a 
district-wide decline of 0.02 pcrccm. 
In the category of banks with 
assets of $25 million to $50 million, 
Missouri banks reported a 20 percent 
increase in earnings from 1985 to 
1986 while Oklahoma banks saw an 
82 percent decline in the one-year 
period. Nebraska recorded an earn- 
ings decline of 26 percent. 

Banks in the category of $50 mil- 
lion to $100 million in assets 
reported a 1986 return on assets 
amounting to about half the return 
recorded in 1985, the report said. 
However, Nebraska, Kansas and 
Wyoming banks in that category 
reported improved earnings in 1986. 

In Ihe category of banks with 
assets of more than $100 million, 
Nebraska had a 10 percent increase 
from the previous year, while the 
10th District reported an 18 percent 
decline overall. 

The district's banks also have had 
a marked increase in loan losses, the 
report said. 

Nationwide, loan losses increased 
2.5 times between 1980 and 1986. In 
the 10th District, loan losses 
increased nearly fivefold, the report 
said. 

Within the district, losses varied 
by lender type. Losses at farm banks 
and energy banks increased about 
seven times. 

The only bright spot for 10th Dis- 
trict banks may be primary capital — 
equity plus loan loss reserves, Myers 
said. 

For agriculture and real estate 
banks, capital has been even higher 
— 9.84 percent and 8.7 percent, 
respectively, at the end of 1986. 





2223 Tuttle 
Creek Blvd. 

776-5003 

NOW MANHATTAN'S LARGEST LIQUOR, BEER, AND WINE STORE. STATE 
LAW DOES NOT ALLOW US TO ADVERTISE BRANDS OR PRICE. WE HAVE 

ALL ITEMS DISCOUNTED EVERYDAY IN ALL KPTS. 

WE HAVE OR WILL HAVE EVERY BRAND OF IMPORTED BEER 
AVAILABLE. WE WILL SOON HAVE A GOO SQ. FOOT COOLER FOR ALL 
YOUR COLD BEER AND WINES. LOOK FOR OUR FINE WINE ROOM SOON 
TO BE ADDED ON. 

ALL BOURBON, CANADIAN WHISKEY, GIN, VODKA, SCOTCH AND 
WINES ON SALE WE CANT GIVE THE PRICE BUT IT IS THE LOWEST! 

DROP BY-ANO SEE OUR NEW STORE. NOW 4.000 SQ. FT. WE HAVE 
M LARGEST STORE AND LARGEST SELECTIONS. 




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332 Poyntz 
... in the 'art of 
downtown 




Restaurant and 
Fundrinkery 



Home of the 
'50$, '60s, and 70s Tunes 

Catch The Bus To And From 

Bobby T's For All Home 

Football Games! 

3240 Kimball— Candlewood Shopping Center 
Across from Cico Park 



Godfatherls Pizza 



welcomes the 
Students at K.S.U. 




ssociates 



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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Monday, Auguat 24, 1997 



IS 



Army ROTC alters requirements; 
juniors allowed to enter program 



By Pattl Paxson 

Staff Writer 



Beginning this fall, juniors are 
allowed to participate in the Army's 
ROTC program, said Dana Brcs, 
enrollment officer for K-State's 
Army ROTC program. Previously, 
those interested in pursuing their col- 
lege education via Army ROTC had 
to make the decision earlier in their 
college career. 

Entering Army ROTC as a junior 
is an "alternate entry option," Brcs 
said, "We encourage most students 
to come in their freshman year — 
that's a real good year.** 

In addition, the junior-year option 
is one more chance to join Army 
ROTC before graduation. 



The Air Force ROTC already 
allows students to enter as juniors, 
said Danny Kerr, unit superintendent 
for K-State's Air Force ROTC, 

"In fact, some of our best cadets 
arc the ones who come in their junior 
year," he said. "Often they end up 
becoming corps commanders and 
getting regular appointments as Air 
Force active duty officers." 

Students entering Army ROTC 
under the junior-year option must 
attend Camp Challenge, a six-week 
summer training course at Fort 
Knox, Ky. Camp Challenge is equi- 
valent training for those students not 
in ROTC iheir first two years, Bres 
said. 

Students entering Air Force 
ROTC in their junior year must 



attend six weeks of summer field 
training, Kerr said. 

Army ROTC regulations dictate 
that a student sign an enlistment 
agreement upon graduation from col- 
lege and, in most cases, the Army 
will offer the student a commission, 
Brcs said. 

"The student expresses a prefer- 
ence for a commission in the (Army 



National) Guard, the Reserves or 
active duty," he said. 

Kerr said all Air Force ROTC 
cadets are commissioned as officers 
on active duty upon graduation from 
college. A graduate will become 
cither a reserve officer or a regular 
officer, with reserve status leaving 
the officer open for job cuts and a 
definite date of separation. 




Hair 



Affair 

Designs for 

Men and Women 

HAIRCUTS-S6 
PERMS-$31.50 

10% OFF WITH K-STATE ID UNTIL 10-30-87 
465 E. POYMTZ in TOWN EAST CENTER 776-5488 



New law affects 
smoker's habits 



By The Coltegion Staff 

Smokers take notice: The new 
Kansas law regarding smoking in 
public places may change your 
smoking habits. 

The law, enacted July I , states that 
all public buildings are non-smoking 
areas unless designated otherwise. 

John Lambert, campus safety 
director, said the law prohibits smok- 
ing in all campus buildings. Howev- 
er, departments may determine the 
designated smoking areas in the 
buildings, he said. 

Jack Connaughton, assistant 
director of the Union, said the Union 
and other campus buildings are try- 
ing to accommodate both smokers 
and non-smokers. He said the Union, 
however, has more of a challenge 
enforcing the law because it is an 



activity center, not an academic 
building. 

"We are here to serve," Con- 
naughton said. "We don't want to 
turn those people (smokers) off. The 
Union is more retail. We want to 
please the customers." 

Designated smoking areas in the 
Union are tentative, he said. The 
Union Governing Board will finalize 
smoking areas at its meeting in early 
September. 

Until then, designated smoking 
areas in the Union are the recreation 
area, ground level, first floor and sec- 
ond floor. The third floor of the 
Union is non-smoking. Smoking in 
meeting rooms will be at the discre- 
tion of those meeting in the rooms. 

"We will serve the best we can," 
Connaughton said. 



Students Are Welco me! 
t STGREAT BT 

Co mmission 
Church 

Statement of Faith: 



We believe the Bible to be the 
Inspired, the only in fallible, 
authoritative Word of Cod. 

We believe there Is one 
almighty, perfect and triune 
God: Father, Son, and Holy 
Spirit, eternally coexistent 
personalities of the same 
essence. 

We believe in the deity of our 
Lord Jesus Christ, In Mis virgin 
birth, His sinless life. His 
substitutionary death, His 
bodily resurrection, His 
ascension to the right hand of 
the Father and His personal 
return in power and glory. 

We believe in the personality of 
the Holy Spirit, and In His 
ministry of convicting and 
regenerating sinful men. and 
Indwelling, scaling and 
empowering believers. 



We believe In the fall of man 
from the state of innocence In 
which he was created to one of 
total depravity in which he Is 
devoid of spiritual life, and 
Incapable, apart from divine 
power, of pleasing Cod. 
We believe to the Justification 
of the sinner by grace through 
faith alone. 

We believe that the church 
universal Is composed of all 
true believers and that its 
members should assemble 
themselves together In local 
churches for worship, prayer, 
fellowship and teaching with a 
view to being equipped lo fulfill 
the Great Commission. 
We believe In the bodily 
resurrection of the saved to 
Immortality, and in the 
conscious eternal suffering of 
the lost. 



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Financing Available 





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HAIR CLINIC TTJ 



WELCOMES YOU!!! 

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8 Stylists to Serve You 



Handi-Corner 1106 Laramie 

in Aggieville 



OPEN: 
Mon.-Fri. 8-8 

Sat. 8-6 
Sun. Noon-5 



WALKINS 
WELCOME 



539-6699 



RESUME 



$15.00 

EXPERT 



Career Planning & Placement 
Holtz Hall 

Hours: Monday through Friday - 8:00 to 5:00 

Phone 532-6506 

The Career Planning and Placement Center is pleased to offer a new service 
to students- the "Resume Expert." is a computer program designed for 
students, alumni, and fee-paid non -affiliates to easily develop a resume that 
best suits their needs. The $15.00 cost covers the following: 

• Your ownership of the disk will allow you to easily revise your resume 
now and in the future. (This program runs on an IBM PC or compatible 
with at least 360 K RAM with or without color graphics display board .)* 

• One computerized spelling check 

• Up to two separate resumes: Printing of one draft and one revision of 
each 

• Laser printing of 10 final copies ($5.00 for another 10 copies) Note: 
Original printouts must be done at the Career Planning and 
Placement Center (your subsequent copying should be done 
elsewhere). 

For more information, contact Career Planning and Placement Center. Holtz 

Hall. 

• Students who do not have access to a suitable computer may request use of a computer in 

Holtz Hall. Appointment* onli 



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539-0888 
539-8888 

FREE DELIVERY MENU 

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r Steak 
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Spicy and Tangy Seel 
Yu Sniang Beat 

VEGETABLES 

Buddha s Delight 

LO MEIN 

Chicken. Roast Pork or Beet 
Shrimp LO Mem 

CANTONESE FOOD 

Chicken Hoasl Pork or Beel 
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Fried Rice 

20c more lor Shnmp 



APPETIZERS 

3 Egg Rolls (?) 

4 Crisp Won Tons (6) 
5. Crab R a goon (4) 

POULTRY 

6 Lemon Chicken 

7 Chicken with Almonds 

8 Moo Goo Gai Pan 

9 Chicken with Snow Peas 

10 'KungPaoCnicken 

1 1 *Vu Shiang Chicken 

12 'Spicy and Tangy Chicken 

13 Chicken with Cashew Nuts 

PORK 

14. Sweet and Sour Pork 

15 'HunamPofli 

16 Pork with Snow Peas . 

SEAFOOD 

17. 'fioyai Peking Shrimp 

ifl Shrimp with Lobster Sauce 

19 Sweet and Sour Shrimp 

20 - Yu Shiang Shi imp 



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FOR LUNCH ONLY 

Monday-Friday 11 00 a.m. -2.30 p m 
COMBINATION PLATTERS 

1 Chicken Chow Mem. Egg Roll, Fried Rice 

2 Pork Chow Mem, Egg Roll, Fried Rice 

3 Shrimp Chow Mem, Egg Roll. Fried Rice 

4 Sweet and Sour Pork, Egg Ron. Fried Rice 
5, Sweel and Soui Chicken, Egg Roll. Fried Rice 
5. Sweet and Sour Shrimp, Egg Roll, Fried Rice 
7 Pork with Snow Peas, Egg Roll. F ned Rice 
fi Diced Chicken with Almonds. Egg Roll. Fried Rice 
y Moo Goo Gai Pan. Egg Roll, Fried Rice 

10 Pepper Steak, Egg Roll, Fned Rice 
ti Beet wtlh Broccoli, Egg Roll. Fried Rice 

12 Beel with Snow Peas. Egg Roll, Fried Rice 

13 Beel with Chinese Vegetables. Egg Roll. Fried Rice 

14 Shrimp with Lobster Sauce, Egg Roll. Fried Rice 

15 Saoleed Sliced Prawns. Egg Roll. Fned Rice 




/Restaurant 



1304 WESTLOOP 

539-0888 
539-8888 



NOT VALID WITH ANY OTHER SPECIAL PROMOTION 




Buy 1 Entree 

get 1 of equal 

or less value 

for 

Vt Price 



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• ' 



Augual 24, t»B7 




Airlines under fire 

'Industry is scared to death' 



By The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON - - Among an 
exclusive club of 535 frequent flyers 
— the members of Congress — sen- 
timent is growing in favor of new 
laws forcing improvements in airline 
safety and service. 

Bui even before a Northwest Air- 
lines jet crashed after taJceoff from 
Detroit last Sunday, killing up to 158 
people, the open question was: How 
far might Congress go in imposing 
new requirements on the airlines? 



Analysis 



Swff/Andy Nelson 



Waitin' and anticipatin' 

Waiting to register for fall classes can be a tedious process with the hot sun beating down, but Jerold 
Spohn Jr. stood his ground Thursday morning outside Ahearn Field House as others filed by to pay fees 
before him. Spohn soon had his chance to get inside, wait some more and (hen pay for bis schooling. 



Nine years after U.S. airlines were 
deregulated, there is a growing sense 
on Capitol Hill that legislators ought 
to take some action on aviation 
issues. It's a threat the airlines are 
taking seriously. 

"I think this industry is scared to 
death," says Jon F. Ash, an airline 
consultant in Washington. "A num- 
ber of them arc running around the 
Hill lobbying (o try to prevent the 
imposition of these types of 
dictates." 

Congress has been working on two 
major pieces of aviation legislation 
this year. One would provide billions 
of dollars for airports and the air 
traffic control system, the other 
would require airlines to report 
monthly on delayed and canceled 
flights, lost luggage and other service 
problems. 

Concedes William F, Bolgcr, pres- 
ident of the Air Transport Associa- 
tion, the airline industry's trade 
group, "Airlines aren't enjoying the 
greatest confidence in the world in 
Congress, and that's unfortunate." 

More and more legislators are 
using the word "rcrcgulation" to 
describe what they're considering, 



even though what they mean by it 
varies. 

There are those who want the air- 
lines to report publicly on the quality 
of their service. Some want the car- 
riers to be penalized if they fail to 
meet minimum levels of service. A 
number want tighter restrictions on 
flight rules and requirements for bet- 
ter equipment. 

A few think all that's needed is for 
better government enforcement of 
regulations that already exist. But 
others say the Civil Aeronautics 
Board should be reestablished and 
with it the control it once had over 
airline routes and rates. 

"If the FAA (Federal Aviation 
Administration) cannot handle our 
deregulated skies safely, I would 
support rcregulation of the airline 
industry. Safety must come first," 
Senate Majority Leader Robert Byrd, 
D-W.Va., said last April. 

"I now think that the airline indus- 
try is being run totally by computers 
for profit and we arc not seeing the 
response to the consumer needs," 
said Sen. Ted Stevens, R-Alaska, at a 
Senate Commerce Committee hear- 
ing last month. "This traveling public 
is getting very, very disturbed. 1 have 
seen it before. Congress will react" 
Unclear, though, is how willing 
lawmakers arc to put their angry 
words into action. Bills that would go 
dramatically beyond consumer pro- 
tection efforts — such as one intro- 
duced by Rep. Glenn English, D- 
Okla., to re institute the CAB and fed- 
eral regulation of the airlines — have 
yet to receive serious consideration. 
When the airlines were dcrccu- 



latcd by Congress in 1978, the gov- 
ernment stopped controlling two 
things: routes and rates. Federal reg- 
ulators continue to oversee the most 
basic safely rules, from certifying 
pilots right down to approving the 
firc-rctardant materials used in 
cabins. 

The airlines themselves, which 
initially opposed deregulation for 
fear that many of them would be dri- 
ven out of business, now strongly 
believe that the idea was a good one. 

Deregulation supporters note that 
while fares have dropped since 1978, 
the number of people flying each 
year has soared from 275 million to 
418 million, and annual U.S. airline 
passenger revenues have climbed 
from SI 8.8 billion to S40.1 billion. 

"Airline deregulation is the finest 
piece of consumer legislation of ihc 
past decade," says Clark Onstcad, a 
vice president of Texas Air Corp., 
which owns Continental, Eastern and 
several other airlines. 

But safety statistics have not 
looked good in recent months. 
Reported incidents in which planes 
came too close to each other 
increased from 479 through the first 
seven months of 1986 to 615 for the 
same period ibis year. And 6 1 5 errors 
by air traffic controllers were 
reported for the first half of 1987, 
compared to 542 in the first six 
months of last year. 

Public complaints about service 
filed with the Transportation Depart- 
ment rose from 932 in July 1986 to 
5,995 last month. 



Committee doubts 
missile's accuracy 



By The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON —The guidance 
system on the MX nuclear-tipped 
missile has had so many problems 
that there are "serious questions of 
confidence" in the weapons which 
have been deployed, the House 
Armed Services Committee said 
Sunday. 

The report by the Democratic- 
controlled panel was sharply critical 
of the Air Force and the Northrop 
Corp., which built the inertia! mea- 
surement unit, as Ihe guidance sys- 
tem is formally known. 

Ll. Col. Richard Oborn, a spokes- 
man for the Air Force, disputed the 
conclusions about the accuracy of the 
weapon, which is known formally as 
the Peacekeeper. 

"There's no question about the 
capability of die Peacekeeper sys- 
tem. Its accuracy has been demon- 
strated in 17 test flights," Oborn said. 

Tony Cantafio, a spokesman for 
Northrop, said he had not seen the 
panel's report and could not respond 
to specifics in the document. 

However, the report said that of 
the 17 tests thus far, only five used 
the type of guidance system that 
wou Id actually go on the MX deploy- 
ed in a silo. The other dozen were test 
versions. 

"As a result of the significant man- 
agement deficiencies and ineffective 



program monitoring, serious ques- 
tions of confidence in the deployed 
MX missile force have arisen," the 
report said. 

"The Air Force likes to cite the 
success of the test program," said 
Rep. Lcs Aspin, D- Wis., chairman of 
the Armed Services Committee. 
"But our investigation shows that 
only five of the 17 test shots have 
used the production version of the 
guidance system, as opposed to the 
research version." 

"And of those five shots, two fell 
far outside the target zone," he said. 
"Thai's a success rate of 60 percent, 
which scores a 'D' most places." 
Oborn agreed that only five tests 
used the production version of the 
guidance system, but noted, "ihc bot- 
tom line for the accuracy of the sys- 
tem is better than the design specifi- 
cations call for." 

The report summarized a series of 
hearings held earlier this summer by 
(he panel's research and develop- 
ment subcommittee and its procure- 
ment subcommittee. 

The dispute is only the latest con- 
troversy surrounding the MX, the 
10 warhead weapon that has been 
one of the main components of Presi- 
dent Reagan's program of building 
new nuclear weapons. 



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21 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Monday, August 24, 1987 



Retired professor 
from grain science 
dies at age 87 



By The Collegian Staff 

Former K -State faculty mem- 
ber John A. Shcllenbcrger, for 
whom Shcllenbcrger Hall is 
named, died Aug. 14. He was 87 
years old. 

Shellcnberger, a distinguished 
professor emeritus, was head of 
what is now the Department of 
Grain Science and Industry for 21 
of his 26 years at K Slate. He 
retired in 1970. 

Well-known for his work in 
cereal chemistry, he published 
about 200 technical articles and 
co-authored a hook. 

He also took on many short- 
term assignments while at K- 
State. Besides working for the 
U.S. State Department and the 
U.S. Department of Agriculture, 
he served as chairman of the 1948 
U.S. Delegation to the United 
Nations Food and Agriculture 
Organization meeting on Grain 
Conservation. 

Before coming to K-State in 
1944, Shellenberger was aconsul- 
lani to the Argentine government. 
He took the position at the request 
of the Armor Foundation, a part of 
the National Research Council. 

Shcllenbcrger was also active 
in opening up grain trade markets 
between the United Slates and 
Union of Soviet Socialsts 
Republics. 

Among the numerous awards 
he received for his work are the 
Outstanding Achievement Gold 
Medal of the University of Min- 




John Shellenberger 



nesola and the Neumann Medal of 
the Association of Cereal 
Research, Dctmold, West 
Germany. 

For his contributions to global 
understanding and cooperation in 
cereal technology, he was 
awarded the CM. Bailey Award 
from the International Associa- 
tion of Cereal Chemists, 

He was also a fellow of the 
American Association for the 
Advancement of Science. 

For his service to the Universi- 
ty, Shcllenbcrger received the 
KSU Alumni Medallion and the 
KSU Gamma Sigma Delta Distin- 
guished Alumni Award. 

He is survived by his wife, 
Annabel, three daughters and four 
grandchildren. 



Rubes® 



By Leigh Rubin 




Where non-lat milk comes from 



'Superfund' case settled 



By The Associated Press 

CONCORD, N.H. ■ General 
Electric and two other companies 
have agreed to pay nearly $2.7 mil- 
lion, 60 percent of cleanup costs at a 
New Hampshire toxic waste dump, 
in a partial settlement in one of the 
First "superfund" cleanup cases to go 
through trial. 

Friday's agreement follows more 
than four years of litigation and 10 
months of federal court trial in two 
phases on liability and damages for 
the one -acre Ottati and Goss site and 
the adjacent, 5.8 -acre Kingston Steel 
Drum dump in Kingston. 

General Electric, Solvents Recov- 



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CLASSIFIED RATES 
One day: 1 5 words or tower, $2.25, IS 
cents per word over 1 5; Two consecu- 
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cents per word over 1 5; Three consecu- 
tive days: 15 words or fewer, $4 00. 25 
cents per word over IS; Four consecu- 
tive days: 15 words or fewer, $4.50, 30 
cents per word over 15; Five consecu- 
tive days: f 5 words or fewer, $4.75, 35 
cents per word over 15. 

Classifieds a'fi payable m advance unless cli 
ent has an established account wilh Student Putjii 
cations 

Deadline is noon the day belore publication 
noon FRIDAY POR Monday spacer 

Student Publications wilt not be responsible 
lor more t n an on e mono c I assi I >ed i r> set t ion 1 1 1 s the 
advertiser s responsibility Id contact the paper il an 
enur SMMt No adiustment will be made il tne error 
doe* ool alter the value ot the ad 

Dupl.y Cl» tilied Rales 

One day S4 96 per inch. Three consecutive 
days M /"S per inert Five consecutive days 14 50 per 
inch Ten consecutive days |4 25penncn (Deadline 
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Ctassitied advertising is available only to those 
who do not discriminate on the basis ol race cotor 
religion, national origin, set or ancestry 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



01 



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\ 
\ 




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ICUIUmmIPmL.. 1,0c*.*: 





cry Service of New England Inc., and 
Lilly Industrial Coalings Inc. agreed 
to pay nearly $2.7 million for clean- 
ing up and monitoring water at the 
Ottati and Goss site. Attorney Gener- 
al Stephen Merrill said. 

Under a separate agreement earlier 
(his month, a company found respon- 
sible for dumping less than 1 percent 
of the toxic waste at the site, KJ. 
Quinn and Co. Inc.. agreed to pay 
$270,000 to the EPA and $30,000 to 
New Hampshire's hazardous- waste 
cleanup fund. 

"We have by no means closed the 
case," said Jeremy Korzenick, an 
assistant slate attorney general. "For 
one, there are other liable parties." 



U.S. District Judge Martin Lough - 
lin is considering who will pay how 
much of the remaining 40 percent of 
cleanup costs at the Ottati and Goss 
site. 

The judge is also considering the 
federal and state governments' 
request to require two other compa- 
nies to pay for cleaning the Kingston 
Steel Drum site. 

The four companies in the agree- 
ments announced Friday generated 
the waste dumped at the Oiiau and 
Goss site, Korzenick said. 

They were among 12 companies 
and individuals sued by federal and 
state governments and the town of 
Kingston, which are trying to recover 



millions of dollars spent for cleaning 
up both sites and to collect millions 
more to finish the job. 

The sites are on the Environmental 
Protection Agency's superfund 
national priority list. The fund pays 
for emergency cleanups and govern- 
ments collect from the responsible 
parlies later. 

The EPA in January recom- 
mended a $15 million cleanup of the 
Kingston site. The agency already 
has spent more than $4 million at the 
site, mosUy to remove 4,400 barrels 
of hazardous wasie in 1982. 



ClassAds 



By Jim Davis 



By Charles Schulz 



FLYING INTEREST you? Fo< in formal ion on K State 
Flying Club cell Hugh Irvm. 532 Mil en 539-3128 

ntn 

WAN T E0- 100 overweight people lo try new choco 
late, vanilla, and strawberry neibai weight control 
program Nu drugs, no enercise Doctor approved 
too J 'i guaranteed MasterCard and Visa accepted 
Call ■ Jn-Sl l« or 7781465 It 301 

110-S360 WEEKlV'Up Mailing Circular* 1 No 
Ouotasibosses information Rush salt addressed 
envelope CM/NACDE POLB 7730, Rock lord IL 
61126 (« 191 

DOUGHNUTS CINNAMON tolls and pastries, 
served tale Friday andSatordav nights Beginning 
July 10. 1987 At Bakery On The Square, 1217 Mora, 
behind Campus Cleaners II 2) 

HOLLYWOOD'S BEST Get your Cmemagic Video 
coupon books horn Joy. 776 6494. belore B p m li- 
st 

THE FONE Crisis Center will be holding volunteer 
training Aug 29 and 30 m Union 213 Alt interested 
persons are encouraged to can 532**85 to regit 
let (151 

MONDAYS 
^nXt SHRIMP NIGHT 
CCnO. IOC shrimp 

OWB 

418 Poynu 



$2.75 pitchers 
4-7 p.m. 



SILK WEDDING and tlot»i arrangements Made to or 
der bouquets corsages etc Fi«e years •■pen 
ence S392M7 tit 



AMRTMEHTS_F0H BfNf -FUftWaHEO « 

TWO BEDROOM basement apartment lor rem Fully 
lurmshed 1230 Renter pays water and eleclric 
53? 322a |1-6| 

HELP 1 TRANSFERRED need to sublease targe one 

bedroom neit to campus 820 Sunsel *28S 537 

1591 II -Si 
THREE BEDROOM, utilities mostly paid No pets 

wsterbeds 53»«OS£. Monday. Wednesday Friday 

mornings, or 1013) 4M -2633 <1 5) 

FREE RENT last month ot yearly lease Ten or twelve 
month tease Available in August No pets 537 
8309 tuft 



AUTOMOBILES FOR SALE 



1978 PONTIAC Firebird. Tiop. lour speed 14 000 
m 1 1* s on rebu il t en g me Call 535K 1 34 even i n g s 1 1 
51 



CHILD CANE 



«7 



CHILD CARE -Teacher na* openings in Day Care 
hums near Nortbview school Nutritious meals 
aclntl.es 5390585 licensed (I 51 

PART-TIME SITTER needed lor tour children age) 5. 
5 3 1 Dependable responsible own transports 
lion necessary Relerences, enpsnence prelened 
539-1521 (1-3) 

EWfLDYMEHT W 

GRILL COOKS needed days ot evenings Apply in 
person, Bobby TV 32*0 Kimball across Irom Cico 
Park (1-0 

NEED PART TIME person to work in the showroom ol 
Si artdard Piumbmg Musi nave tome plumbing e< 
penence Call lor an interview 776 5012 |1 121 

ACA DEMICSERVICESCoordmstor Develop and co 
ordinate academic assistance component tor high 
school students teaching experience with htgn 
school students from diverse environments es 
sentiai. B S required M S preferred in education 
counseling child development or related field 
t IB 000 Job description available upon lequest 
(phone 913/532-6*971 Send letter ot intent, re- 
sume, and namesrphone numbers 01 three refer- 
ences by Aug 28. 1967 to Director Upward Bound 
Program 202 hoi ton Hell Kansas State Universrly. 
Manhattan KS 66506 KSUisAAlEOE (1-31 

TUTOR -COUNSELORS lot area high school parti ct 
panis in Upward Bound Education majors with an 
emphasis in Main. English or Science are encour 
aged to apply KSU students tumor status or 
above, minimum GPA 3 12-15 houra/week. liexi 
ble schedule Ability to work with diverse groups 
H SOrhour preference lo workiiudy students Ap 
plications available Upward Bound Program. 202 
notion Halt. 5324*97 Applications and transcript 
due Sept 2,by5pm KSUisAAJEE employer (121 



NOW HIRING Part lime evening and weekend grtli 
cooks to 20 rt our sf week Apply in person 111 
Soul h Si b TneCne'Cale il 101 

DATA ENTRY Operator Student Assistanl -Pie 
Admissions Unit Up to 20 hours per week Ihrougb 
December Must be available in (wo or more hour 
lime blocks Possible continued employment 
through sprmg semester at reduced hours Re 
quires accuracy, reliability, familiarity with com 
puieis and office procedures Selection criteria 
will include GPA prior related computer expert 
ence and longer ily Starting salary t3 35 per hour 
Applications available HI Anderson Hall Rm 1 19 
Closing dale Aug 28 EOE ft 5) 

RE NT WAY 

3012 Afldosor Ait, md 419 K FWiu 

We m looking la pin trrr help. 

BooLkeping > plus, bul nut rcceisaiy. 

Musi be nest in ippemnx inJ like lo mnt people 

Apply in ptraan it both au*es. 

STUDENT RECEPTIONIST Administrative User Ser 
vices is seeking a Inendly. erwrgehc student lot a 
variety ot duties including receiving visitors an 
swenng (he telephone copying, filing typing and 
word processing Up to 30 hours per weak possi 
bfe Hours available communications skills and 
lypmg skills will be used to evaluate applicants 
Contact Debbie Hyde Anderson ?1 5326261 by 
Sept 1st to apply |t 3t 

STUDENT PROGRAMMERS Administrative User 
Services is recruiting 10 till two student program 
mer positions starting immediately Programming 
eipenenca wiin COBOL and OSUCL m an IBM 
*381MUSenvinK>mentiequtieaPosiHorisinvolve 
administrate applications programming Appli 
cable experience grade point average and longev 
ity potential will be used to evaluate appik jms 
Contact Debbie Hyde Anderson 21 532*261 by 
Sept 1st to apply it 3j 

HELP WANTED! 

Now accepting applications for full 
and part lime help. Experience 
preferred. Please call 776-4117 for 
interview appt. 

DAIRY QUEEN 

1015 N. 3rd 
Ask for Mr. Frye 

KANSAS CAREERS noeda a student *ith excep 
1 tonal word processing and tlencal skills 10 work 
altemoons starling So pi 1 Obase 3 skills preler 
red Submit application teller resume and relet 
encesbyAug 28 lo Kansas Careers. F aire hit d Hall 
30*. Kansas State university. Manhattan, Kansas 
66506 Kansas Slale University is *n Equal Oppor 
1 unity Employer II 51 

PARTTIME WORK-lull time pay ' 1 1 Christmas Around 

The World needs area demonstrators' Seasonal 

You t own hours No cash investment collecting. 

ot delivery Pali i 238 5*29. Adele 539-2930 or Terry 

537 3948 (1 101 
COLLEGE STUDENTS earn $6 10 per hour working 

part-lime on campus For more information, can i 

800-932-0526 If 2i 
HAVE FUN and make money too wiin Avon 539- 

1936 I l-5i 



HOUSES AND MOBILE HOMES FOR HENT 12 



THREE BEDROOM lurmshed. will accommodate 
three students Two bathrooms, TV room, no pets 
no childten J375 plus utilities, one year lease or 
10 month lease 539-S608 IHtl 

MULT I BEDROOM HOUSE, stove, retrrgeraloi. cen 
trai air fireplace laundry hookups, garage Call 
537-6389 I ltd 

RENT OR sell Rent negotiable, unfurnished, sluve 
and refrigerator, washerrdryer connections child 
ot small cat ok Call 783-4366 ot 7762230 1 1 31 

HOUSES AMP MOeUE HOMES FW SALE li 

1975-2 bedroom, t* x 70 mobile home ai Walnut 
Grove Appliances, central air New deck with awn 
mg. chain link lanced yard, storage shed, carpets 
(new throughout) Walioauered. redecorated t 
month ago 494 2720 11 5) 



Buy, Sell or Trade 
in Collegian Classifieds 



532-6555 



t9»* AMERICAN Mobile Home, 14 » 60 two 
bedroom central am heal located at Colonial Car 
dens Lot 332. va ry clean, boo k valu a S 1 3 000 m ake 
otter 1 482 3311 or 482 3523 It 5i 

KS PARENTSrstudenis Oont waste money renting 
Buy and recover your investment at re sale or tax 
time Beautiful one year old three bedroom Iwo 
bath mo bile home Fully furnished ail appliances 
539 71 19 or 537 0104 1 1-5) 



LOST mND FOUND 



H 



LOST-GOLD watch with black face and diamond 
Ptease return- very important Ktisli White (539 
7571) It 2) 

FEMAiEGERMAN Shepnerd pup Approximately 25 
pounds tound on ^mipua. no idem it ica! ton To 



claim or adopt call 7t6 8433 111 
i 

MISCELLANEOUS MgnCHAIiOISE 



15 



SEVEN PIECE wood framed furniture sel (sol. 

ttiani endtaWeii »Wu WWW '76*313 II 3i 
TWOSIUULNt sue malcrmig desks one with chair 

*25andS35 Pbonir 539^875 between 5 7pm (1 Jj 

FOR SALE AMiFM cabinet sleteo. gteaf sound 
good condition Call Ctinsoi Dave 5394B66 fl i\ 

DRAFT INQ TABLE 140 » 30l andcfiarr *J5 Phone 
776 3416 II il 



M0T0«CTCLES/BIC*CLfS fOR SALE 



IS 



COMMUTER BICrCLES 24 inch frames Peugeoi 
ISO Schwinn Conlinentat with rack $45 Call 537 
4236 il 21 



PEnSONALS 



IS 



RONDA -AUGUST 241 n already' II s tune for rqshl 
and Ralph again Won 1 we be glad lo see our | 
and 501 1i iends ? Ihijre will be lume lonely wesk 
rughts with one ot us al Mutlly » house and one in 
weal Stadium At least i can see you some ol lh» 
Love Joe lit 

SLV FOX -Thanks tor the best summer 1 I Ti always 
remembet Dip the Dude, Honey sesame socket s 
American Enpress 3am chocoiaieicecrearr. me 
picnic baskei. lube steaks anis named alter pa 
rental units, upside down eights, caged lues at 
ways loosing bets, hydtogen and helium, V eating 
worms x s and Os ur was (hat E< s uh-nuse ■ 
Damage f torn Bub iilirr from tun talking tu 2 30 
a m . tale night Urate male parental unit phone 
calls, and all of our wonderful talks and UflMI 10 
gefher I miss you already 1 Haveatabuiousyea' as 
I be KSU Ambassador lo the Ivori Coast*' Love Zip 
Code— PS Never lorget the source ol my nick 
name" ID 

FORD THREE stall Jules what a summer 1 1 m really 
glad I gol to know you Remember midnight 
snack j com nachos Rainbow Punch Koot Aide 
tou gotta love It! Have a great year' four favorite 
rnoniii-jii/ || 

SMITHIES. YOU really know how lo party genetic 
Smut trues 111 

WELCOME NEW Smurinies one and all The past 
lew days have been a bail, with picnic, reireat. and 
party too. we are gi dd lo nm* gotten to know you 
We're looking forward lo a greai yean The return 
I ng Smurthw arte women dt 

P ROFESSIONAL iEHVI CES M 

PROMPT A HO RT ION and contraceptive services In 

Lawrence 9136415716 ilt'l 
PREGNANT? BIRTHRIGHT can help Free preg 

nancy lest Confidential Call 537 9180 103 S 

Fourth SI . Suite 25 lliti 



RENTALS 



21 



SUPPLIES PRINTER-typewnlei Rental typewriters 
available correcting and i.uit correcting. Hull 
Business Machines. 715 North 12th. Aggieville. 
539-7931 lltf) 



22 



RESUME/ TYPING S ERVICE 

PAPERS RESUMES, cover letters theses and dis 
sanations entered, stored and completed to your 
spec i tic at tons Letter-quality printer Come see 
us Ross Secretarial Services 614 N 12lb(aciuss 
frum Kites! 539-514? (1 51 



ROOMMATE WANTEO 



23 



ROOMMATE NEEDED despeialoly -Own loom 
plus lots 0* extras Very nice— Winslori Place 
S170»lusul es Barbara. 539 7464 (131 

ROOM AND board tor male will do laundry Call 49* 
8249 115) 



Crossword 



By Eugene Shelter 



ACROSS 
1 Roman 
states- 
man 
S Bounder 
9 Last 

writes? 
12 Swift 
horse 
IS Dolores 

del — 
UThedaof 

sllents 
IS Back of 
the neck 
18 Certain 
18 Noah's 
dock? 

20 Agree 
with 

21 Concert 
halls 

23 Ship- 
shaped 
clock 

24 Indignant 
28 Part of a 

pedestal 

31 Dad's 
retreat 

32 Lasso 
34 It might 

be sacred 

38 Solemn 
promise 

37 So to 
speak 

39 Word with 
doK or 
house 



41 Wild plum 

42 Cubic 
meters 

4S Refugee, 
perhaps 

49 Gets on 
the job 

51 " — All 
Over" 
(song) 

52 Lily 
plant 

53 Anagram 
for rot 

54 Vast 

55 Baseball 
champs 

56 Philip- 
pine 
peasant 

57 Ending 
for six 
or seven 



DOWN 

1 Miracle 
eity 

2 Saiuiarar 
tree 

3 Bark 
cloth 

4 Merle of 
filmdom 

5 Standards 

6 River in 
France 

7 Specks 

8 Carried 
out 
orders 

9 Big hit 
for Al 
Jolson 

10 Dies — 

11 Labels 
17 Chinese 

dynasty 



Solution time: 26 min. 



19 Jewish 

month 
22 Accumu 

late 
24 Japanese 

vegetable 
26 Shade of 

green 

26 "Pease- 
porridge 

27 Thin 
.dagger 

29 Ending 
for can 
or con 

30 Be in debt 
33 Nuclear 

energy 

source 
36 Equities 
38 Throw 

one's — 

around 
40 Asian 

festival 

42 Make 
believe 

43 Enameled 
metal- 
ware 

44 Chimney 
dirt 

46 Adhesive 

47 "A — to 
Live" 

48 Kir*! 
garden 

SO Author 
Levin 




C8YPTOQUIP 



112 

QJEL OLNS IDILN 

OCJTA NJAAYAE 



TA S D N D - 

GTAODYAP 



ZDPGYADOYAE ZTTOATOLP. 

Saturday's Cryptoquipr THE ONLY SPtTT IN BOSS'S 
OFFICE DREADED BY MANY EMPLOYEES THE FIRE 
PLACE. 

Today's Cryptoquip clue: Y equals 1 









,*.*..»«««**, 






i&M^aaiikUa 



. 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Monday, August 24, 1M7 



22 



K.S.U. STUDENTS & FACULTY 

WELCOME TO mANHATTAN 





TO... 



M ^^0 FOOD STORES 



Prices Effective Thru Sept. 29. 1987. 



With Bach 
To School 



MM 



SAVINGS! 




.--/Dillon potato Chips & Snachs 



8 oz. Plain, Rippled, BAR-B-Q, Sour Cream, No Salt, 7.5 oz. 

Thick Cut, 8 oz. Baked Cheese Puffs, Fried Cheese 
Krisps, Nacho Flavored Tortilla Chips or 10 oz. Corn Chips 



FREE! 



With 
Coupon 



: 




ROCHV TOP POP 



Asst. 
Flavors 
2 Liters 



39c 



With 
Coupon 



12 Pech coops, coors Light. Coors Extra 

Gold. Budwelser. Bud Light, miller High 

Lite. Miller Lite. Miller Genuine Draft. 

15 Pack Stroh or Stroh Light 



$100 



OFF 



With 
Coupon 



12" Dell Pizza 



$^00 



OFF 



With 
Coupon 



One Whole 8 Piece Golden Fried ChicKen 
r One Whole wondeRoast ChicKen 




OFF 



With 
Coupon 



Head Lettuce 



Head 



59° 



With 
Coupon 




Any 6" Blooming or Foliage 
Plant or 8" Hanging Basket 




OFF 



With 
Coupon 




—Dillon Coupon— 

Dillon Potato Chips ft snachs 

8 oi. Plain, Rippled, Bar-B-Q. Sour Cream, No Salt 7.5 or Thick Cut, 

S o* + Baked Cheese Puffs. Fried Cheese Kriaps, 8 oz. Nacho Flavored Tortilla 

Chips or 10 oz. Corn Chips 



Ifmil l Pig With VfcM Coupon 
Limit On* Coupon p* Cutlomrr 
Coupon Good Thru S- pt ?9 1987 
Super Coupon* Noi In iudtd In 
Double Coupon Pfogrim 



FREE! 



With 

This 

Coupon 




—Dillon Coupon— 

ROCKV TOP POP 

Assorted Flavors, 2 Liter 



Until ? Bm Wiih Thhv Coupon 
Limit On* Coupon Per Cuilomf* 
Coupon Good Thru S*pi 29 19*7 
Sup*r Coupon* Noi Included 'n 
Double Coupon Program 



39c 



With 

This 

Coupon 




—Dillon Coupon— 

12 Pack Coors. Coors Light Coors Extra 

Bold. Budwelser. Bud Light, miller High Life. 

miller Lite, miller flenulne Draff. 15 Pack 

stroll or stroh Light 



Limit t Pact VMh inn Coupon 
Lrnifl On* Coupon Per Cutlomcr 
Coupon Good Thru Sepi 39 1987 
Super Coupom Not Included In 
Double Coupon Program 



$100 



OFF 



With 

This 

Coupon 




—Dillon Coupon— 



12" Deli Pizza 



Limn i Pa it With Thii Coupon 
Limit On* Coupon Per Customer 
Coupon Good Thru Sepi 79 1387 
Super Coupon* Noi Included In 
Double Coupon Program 



$100 



OFF 



With 

This 

Coupon 




—Dillon Coupon— 

One Whole 8 Piece Golden Fried 
ChicKen or one Whole wondeRoast Chichen 



Limit 1 Ctucfcrn Wiih This Coupon 
Limit On* Coupon P«r Cutiomer 
Coupon Good Thru S*pl M. HIT 
Sup#f Coupon* Noi Included In 
Double Coupon Program 



$100 



OFF 



With 

This 

Coupon 




Dillon Coupon— 

Head Lettuce 



Head 



Until t H.*d Wilh Tfwi Coupon 
Urn 1 1 On* Coupon P.r Cutlom.f 
Coupon Good Thru S*pt ». 198.' 
Super Coupon. Mot Included In 
Doubl. Coupon Progi.fn 



590 



With 

This 

Coupon 




—Dillon Coupon— 

Any 6" Blooming or Foliage 
Plant or 8" Hanging Basket 



LimM % PUnl Witt, Tun Coupon 
Limit On* Coupon P»r Cutlomer 
Coupon Good Thru S*p< 29 1917 
Super Coupon* Not Included In 
Doubt* Coupon Program 



$100 



OFF 



With 

This 

Coupon 



■■ 



i i i i i 



'■ i i 



mmm 



» 









**<****' 



J 






.»5 j *■ 







Business Rush 

One local merchant 
describes the Increased 
business caused by return- 
ing students as "Christmas 
In August." See Page 6. 




Weather 



l'< 

i - r< 

■ 






Mostly cloudy Tuesday with a 30 
percent chance of morning and 
late afternoon thunderstorms, high 
75 to 80. Chance of thunder- 
storms Wednesday. 




Fired Up 



Since his arrival on the K- 
State gridiron in the fall of 
1985, Maurice Henry has 
been anxious to 'bust 
loose." See Page 11. 



Tuesday 

August 25, 1987 



Kansas State University 

Manhattan, Kansas 66506 

Volume 94, Number 2 



Kansas State 



Collegian 



U.S. forces 
chase away 
Iranian ship 

By The Associated Press 

MANAMA. Bahrain — U.S. helicopters 
and warships escorting Kuwaiti tankers out 
of the Persian Gulf chased away an Iranian 
warship Monday in the first major confronta- 
tion of the U.S. convoy operation, witnesses 
said. 

The mine-damaged Bridgeton and three 
other reflagged Kuwaiti tankers in the con- 
voy later cleared the Strait of Hormuz, gate- 
way out of the gulf, and a new convoy of three 
U.S.-cscorted tankers steamed through the 
strait and into the gulf. 

In a separate incident, a U.S. destroyer 
fired a machine gun across the bows of two 
small sailboats that approached the outbound 
convoy. 

The Soviet Union said it would support the 
presence of some minesweepers in the Per- 
sian Gulf but that all other warships should be 
withdrawn to defuse the "explosive situa- 
tion" there. 

An Iranian envoy said in New York his 
nation would cooperate fully with efforts to 
end the seven-year Iran-Iraq war. and Arab 
foreign ministers in Tunis urged Iran to abide 
by a July 20 U.N. Security Council cease-fire 
resolution. 

U.S. warships began on July 20 to escort 
Kuwaiti tankers reflagged with the Stars and 
Stripes through the gulf to protect them from 
Iran, which considers Kuwait an ally of Iraq. 

From a Navy UH-1 helicopter circling 
over the gulf, the approach of the Iranian ship 
prompted what looked like a full-scale naval 
manuever as crews on five U.S. warships 
went on full alert and manned all deck guns, 
said Richard Pyle, an Associated Press repor- 
ter covering the escort operation in a news 
pool. 

But officers aboard the assault carrier Gua- 
dalcanal said there was no overt threat by the 
Iranian vessel. 

It came within 2'A miles of the convoy 
after 8 a.m. as the Guadalcanal and the frigate 
Jarrett were dropping out of the convoy, their 
major task of mine hunting completed. 

Ahead of the convoy lay the Strait of Hor- 
muz, which U.S. officers do not consider a 
high mine threat because of the volume of 
traffic, including Iranian, that passes through. 

"Jarrett was instructed to position herself 
tactically between the convoy and the Iranian 
vessel, which is the normal procedure in tac- 
tical formation," said Guadalcanal comman- 
der Capt. Skip Durcn. 

As seen from the air, the Jarrett and the Ira- 
nian ship appeared to be less than 500 yards 
apart, Pyle said. 

The Iranian vessel was identified as a 
2,500-ton amphibious landing craft, built in 
Britain. Dirren said it has been seen frequent- 
ly in the gulf. 

But British Broadcasting Corp. reporter 
Christopher Morris said, "The sudden arrival 
of the Iranian warship caught the Americans 
completely by surprise.** 

Morris, speaking by radio-telephone from 

a supply ship near the convoy, said the escort 

■ See GULF, Page 10 




Regents alcohol policy 
will allow consumption 
in non-classroom areas 



By Debbie Whilson 
Staff Writer 



■ 



SutT/Andy Nelion 



Cross walk 

A student walks through a light drizzle Monday in front or Ackert Halt. Stu- 
dents had to brave rain and cool temperatures on the first day of classes. 



Due to recent changes in slate laws and 
regulations, alcohol can now be served on 
campus. All that remains to be settled is 
where and when. 

On June 25, the Kansas Board of Regents 
voted to allow alcohol to be served by institu- 
tions in non -classroom areas. 

The decision was made following a state 
law passed in early 1987 which permits con- 
sumption of alcoholic liquor (all alcoholic 
beverages except cereal malt beverages con- 
taining 3.2 percent or less alcohol) in non- 
classroom areas on property under control of 
the Regents. 

The policy passed by the Regents states 
thai "use of alcoholic liquor may be permitted 
under authorized and appropriately con- 
trolled conditions and guidelines to be deter- 
mined by the administration of each school, 
and approved by the Board." 

It also stipulates that alcohol may be 
served only at functions hosted or sponsored 
by cither alumni associations or endowment 
associations. 

After the initial policy was passed by the 
Regents, Charles Reagan, assistant to the 
president, said the administration formed a 
committee to draft a report detailing build- 
ings to be included in the University 's policy. 

The committee met several times over the 
summer and drafted a report, which will be 
submitted to the central administrative staff 
for approval this week, he said. 

Following staff approval, the report will be 
taken to the Regents* meeting in September. 
Upon approval, the policy will be effective 



immediately. 

Some of the buildings and areas included 
in the rough draft arc McCain Auditorium, 
Farrcll Library (Rm 315), Durland Hall (foy- 
er only), Nichols Hall (foyer only). Football 
Office Building (Big Eight room only), 
Bramlagc Coliseum (hospitality room only), 
Mollis House (Alumni Association and KSU 
Foundation) and Weber Hall (Arena only). 

Although the Union is also included in the 
policy, permission for any alcoholic bever- 
age to be served must also be obtained by 
Jack Sills, acting Union director. 

Under the new policy, the Foundation or 
the Alumni Association must request approv- 
al from the president at least 15 days prior to 
the event. Each sponsor will make arrange- 
ments for the provision of alcohol at the event 
with a temporary permit through the director 
of Alcoholic Beverage Control or a licensed 
caterer. 

The sponsoring organization will be 
responsible for assuring that no person under 
the age of 2 1 is allowed to consume alcoholic 
liquor at the event. 

The Regents' policy will be an option 
available to all seven Regents schools. Rea- 
gan said President Jon Wefald is in favor of 
K- State adopting the policy. 

Although some universities may choose 
not to implement the new law, every school 
must submit a report on the amount of interest 
in serving alcohol, and the specific areas 
designated for this use. 

Reagan said the president's house and 
lawn, which are already exempt from the cur- 
rent policy, will remain so under the new pol- 
icy, thus allowing for liquor at barbecues and 
the Christmas reception. 



Inquiry into death 
of 3 people begins 



By The Associated Press 

WELCH, Okla. — Investigators worked 
Monday to piece together information about 
a shooting that left a rural Craig County cou- 
ple and their 1 8-month-old daughter dead and 
two of the man's children in custody. 

The bodies of Kenneth Clinton Wingficld, 
43, his wife, Louise. 36, and their daughter, 
Crete, 18 months, were found in a trash dump 
near their farm home about 7:30 a.m. Mon- 
day, said Sheriff Jess Walker. 

Walker said all three appeared to have 
been shot once in the head. Officials said 
more than one weapon may have been used. 
The bodies were taken to the state medical 
examiner's office in Tulsa for autopsies. 

Walker said the three bodies were found 
several hundred yards from the residence 
where the shootings occurred. The residence 
is north of Welch and about three miles south 
of the Kansas line. 

Authorities in Marshall, Texas, said they 
were holding Ty Wingficld, 19, identified as 



Kenneth Wingficld 's son from a previous 
marriage. Juvenile authorities in Texas also 
were holding Kenneth Wingfield's 16-ycar- 
old daughter, officials said. 

No charges had been filed in the case 
Monday. 

Harrison County, Texas, sheriff's Capt. 
Phil Walker said Ty Wingficld was taken into 
custody without incident Monday morning 
after acquaintances told authorities he had 
mentioned the slayings. 

Ty Wingfield had a rifle with him when he 
was taken into custody, Walker said. 

Oklahoma law officers, including Oklaho- 
ma State Bureau of Investigation agents, 
were dispatched to the Wingfield house and 
found the bodies hidden beneath a piece ol 
tin. said Paul Renfrew, OSBI spokesman. 

Helen Thomas of Thomas Funeral Home 
in Welch said the Wingfield family had 
moved to the farm about one year ago. The 
family had lived earlier in Payson, Ariz., and 
Longview, Texas, she said. 



Wildcat VISA, MasterCards debut 



By Jenny Choulk 

Campus Editor 



Easy credit, no hassles, little or no 
money down. 

Although it may sound like a used 
car salesman's pitch, K-State sopho- 
mores, juniors, seniors and graduate 
students will have the opportunity to 
establish their own credit history 
through the K-Statc Bank Card 
program. 

The program, coordinated by the 
KSU Alumni Association in con- 
junction with the First Bank Card 
Center of Wichita, enables students 
to obtain a Wildcat VISA or Wildcat 
MasterCard. 

Members of the Student Alumni 
Board will be distributing card appli- 
cations in the Union about Sept. I, 



said Amy Button Renz, director of 
membership for the Alumni 
Association. 

'The bank realizes most students 
don't have a source of income," But- 
ton Renz said. 

Kathy Peircc, senior in psycholo- 
gy and chairperson of SAB's Bank 
Card committee, said, "So many stu- 
dents don't ever get the opportunity 
to get a credit card. This is a good 
way that most students can get a cre- 
dit card." 

K-Slale alumni have already had 
the opportunity to use the credit 
cards. Button Renz said the Alumni 
Association started working with 
First Bank in the fall of 1 986 to set up 
the program. 

She said plans were finalized in 
January, with the first informational 



Alumni Association 
offering easy credit 



mailing about the cards occurring in 
April and May. Information was sent 
to 56,000 Alumni Association non- 
member households and 20,500 
Alumni Association member 
households. 

As of Thursday, the Bank Card 
program had generated 2,150 new 
memberships to the Alumni Associa- 
tion. Gaining new members is the 
primary reason for sponsoring the 
program, Button Renz said. 

"(The program) allows us the 
opportunity to provide a benefit of 
membership to the Association." she 



said. "It also allows alums to show 
their loyalty to the University." 

Button Renz said 3,500 current 
Alumni Association members have 
received the credit cards, which fea- 
ture a Willie Wildcat emblem. Five 
hundred people chose to lake advan- 
tage of ihe program without becom- 
ing members of the Alumni Associa- 
tion, she added. 

"We're very excited about the 
program," Button Renz said, "We 
had hoped for an initial response of 
about 5,000, so the response has far 
exceeded our expectations. We're so 



pleased so many wanted to take 
advantage of it." 

Other schools across the state are 
also taking advantage of similiar 
Bank Card programs, said Cheryl 
Koenigs, marketing projects mana- 
ger for First Bank. 

Koenigs said nine universities and 
schools in Kansas are involved in 
bank card programs with First Bank. 
The programs arc a "coming new 
thing," she added. 

"Everybody's got a credit card," 
Koenigs said. "Doing general mail- 
ings to get new card holders wasn't 
working anymore; the market was 
saturated. Through a bank card prog- 
ram, you get in with a group whose 
members have something in com- 
mon; a sense of loyally develops." 

Koenigs said the Alumni Associa- 



tion makes money from coordinating 
the program by getting a portion of 
the cards* annual fee and by getting 
percentages of cash advances and 
sales volume. Button Renz said these 
percentages cannot be released due 
to a contractual agreement with First 
Bank. 

Button Renz said members of the 
Alumni Association pay a 16.8 per- 
cent interest rate with no annual fee 
until May 1988, when it will be $15. 

Nonmembers of the Alumni Asso- 
ciation who choose to obtain a card 
pay a 17.88 percent interest rate with 
an annual fee of S18. Should these 
persons decide to become members 
of the Alumni Association. Button 
Renz said, they would be eligible for 
the lower interest rate. 



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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN. Tu»»d.y, Auguat 28, 1M7 



Briefly 



By The Associated Press 



Campus Bulletin 



People pay $25 to stay in jail 

MARIETTA, Ga. — It wasn't your typical ribbon-cutting cere- 
mony at Cobb County's new $12 million jail. 

Several members of the County Commission and assorted other 
politicians, businessmen and journalists paid $25 for the privilege of 
spending Saturday night locked up in Navy blue prison uniforms. 

The event was intended 10 give the jail's staff a practice run on 
procedures at ihc jail, which should get its first real inmates in a 
couple of weeks. 

'This will be a wedding anniversary I'll never forget," said Coun- 
ty Commissioner Thea Powell, who observed the occasion from one 
cell while her husband, George Powell, passed it in another. 

Members of the gang of hardened law-abidcrs were fingerprinted, 
photographed, handcuffed and led to their cells. Guards in central 
control towers electronically opened and closed the cell doors from 
a master panel. 

Chief Magistrate Jim Bodiford summarily declared the entire 
group guilty of "unlawful surveillance" of the detention center and 
fined them $25 each, payable to the charity of their choice. 

Commission on AIDS to meet 

SANTA BARBARA, Calif. — President Reagan's commission 
on AIDS will meet in Washington on Sept 9-10, ihc White House 
said Monday. 

The 11 -member panel, headed by Dr. W. Eugene Mayberry, 
chairman of the Mayo Foundation's board of directors, will open 
part of its sessions to public comment by people involved in anti- 
AIDS efforts, the press office announced. 

The agenda for the first meeting of the Presidential Commission 
on the Human Immunodeficiency Virus will include "an overview 
of federal agency activities" relating to the problem. 

The commission will hear a report from Secretary of Health and 
Human Services Otis R. Bowcn and other officials involved in the 
federal effort to learn more about the disease and to combal its 
spread. 

The commission "will also hear presentations from organizations 
in the private sector dedicated to the AIDS efforts," the statement 
said. 



Officials discuss travel policy 

McPHERSON — A travel policy for elected and appointed offi- 
cials was discussed Monday by the McPherson County Commission, 
in the wake of death of County Treasurer Richard Cobb. 

Cobb, who had been in office nearly 18 months, was found dead 
of carbon monoxide poisoning Aug. 6 in ihc garage at the home of 
his parents. Two vehicles in the garage had been left running. 

A week ago, a special audii of a motor vehicle fund controlled by 
the treasurer's office showed thai more than $13,000 was unac- 
counted for. Commission Chairman John Magnuson said Monday 
that the commission's attorney and the county administrator are still 
reviewing receipts and other documents related to expenses submit- 
ted by Cobb. 

Ann Gottbcrg, ihc county administrator, said that no other Kansas 
counties of similar size or valuation have format policies or review 
processes dealing with travel. 

The proposal under consideration by the commission would call 
for a written travel request to the administrator for any official tak- 
ing a trip requiring an overnight stay. They would also be required 
to submit actual proof of travel-related expenses, and there would be 
per diem expense provisions in the proposed policy. 




TACO TUESDAY 

featuring those freshly prepared crisp flour shells 

$1.25 MARGARITAS 



99$ TACOS 

OR 3 FOR $2.75 



99C HOT SHOOTERS 

$1.00 

LATE NIGHT TOSTADOS 

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1115 Mora, Aggieville 776-0030 





Governor borrows for wedding 

ALBANY, N.Y. — Gov. Mario Cuomo says he needs a loan to 
help pay for his daughter's wedding. It's cither that or sell souvenir 
ashtrays. 

"I haven't taken out a loan in years," said Cuomo, who makes 
$100,000 a year as governor. 

Cuomo "s daughter Maria, 25, plans to marry shoe designer Ken- 
neth Cole in a small ceremony at the Executive Mansion on Oct. 11. 

During a trip Sunday to western New York, where he spoke at a 
conference on U.S.-Sovict relations, Cuomo said there might be an 
alternative to a loan. 

"We could have souvenir ashtrays made up and sell them for 
$100 each," he joked. "On second thought, if you're going to write 
this, make it S200." 

Cuomo refused to say how much the loan was for. 

Burnett, daughter write book 

LOS ANGELES — When Carol Bumctt and her daughter, Carrie 
Hamilton, were "Under One Roof," it was less than a perfect house- 
hold: Hamilton was on drugs. 

Now, the two arc collaborating on a book by the same name by 
writing alternate chapters on the experience. Hamilton has been free 
of drugs for five years after undergoing a treatment program, said 
Rick Ingersoll, a spokesman for Burnett. 

The mother-daughter team also is to star in a new movie for CBS 
called "Hostage." 

Hamilton starred in the television scries, "Fame," and her mother 
made a guest appearance on the show last year. 

Hussein receives peace award 

AMMAN. Jordan — Jordan's King Hussein on Monday was 
named recipient of the Dag Hammarskjold Award for Peace for his 
efforts in trying to bring about peace talks with the Palestine Libera- 
tion Organization and Israel. 

Hussein was named "The Man of Peace" for his "relentless 
efforts for peace in the Middle East," said the announcement by the 
Dag Hammarskjold Academy. 

Hussein abandoned the effort at joint peace negotiations early last 
year when relations soured between his kingdom and the PLO. But 
since then Hussein has often been mentioned as a possible moderate 
intermediary in approaching a peace process. 

The academy is an independent institution set up in 1963 to honor 
Hammarskjold, of Sweden, the second secretary -genera I of the 
United Nations, who was killed in a plane crash in 1961, 



Book profits to go to charity 

NEW YORK — The Hearst Corp. said Monday it has obtained 
all publishing rights to a book planned by Mayor Edward 1. Koch 
and Cardinal John O'Connor and predicted the profits — which will 
go to charily — could reach SI million. 

Frank Bcnnack Jr., president and chief executive officer of 
Hearst, said Ihc royalties and his company's earnings would go to 
Catholic Charities and to charitable projects designated by Koch. 

Koch said the book would be controversial, with chapters on 
abortion and birth control, gay rights and Israel. The mayor and the 
cardinal have clashed publicly on those matters. 

They will write independently, but, "We each will see the other's 
chapters," Koch said. "It will not be to please one another. Nothing 
sells like controversy." 



TODAV 

RUGBY CUJB meets at 7:45 p.m. in 
Union 206. 

STUDENTS AGAINST DRIVING 
ORl'N'K mccis it 6 p.m. in Union 206. 

SBP GADINKT meets si 9 p m. in the SGA 

office. 

ALPHA CHI SIGMA meets il 7 p.m. in 

Willud 21 K. 

MORTAR llOARDmect5M9pm in Jus 

tin lobhy, 

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL his sche- 
duled the I m;il oral defense ni the doctoral dis- 



seriatim of llwi-Ilwa Lee at 8 a.m. in Blucm- 
ont 257. The dmenation topic will be "A 
Study of Effective Teachcri' Belief Systems 
in Relation lo Their Classroom Practices " 

SPURS officer meeting it 9p.m. on the tec- 
ond floor of the Union 

WEDNESDAY 

SPEECH UNLIMITED Meeu at 3:30 
p.m. in Nichols I.H. Squad Room. 

THURSDAY 

IMVERSITY FOR MAN, INC. will 
have a tabic in the Union from 10 a.m. lo 2 
p.m. for fall class registration. 



Personalized Skin Care. Because there's 
only one skin like your skin. 

mtRLe noRmfln 

Iteonalized Skin Care and MakeUp 
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Downtown 



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$?2 NEIGHBORHOOD BAR ^^lj 

Welcome Back 
Students 

Come Check Out Our New Look! 



The original" 



Thursday $ DAZE $ 

Dollar Pitchers 

Claflin Own Daly 539-9619 





TUESDAY 

DR, SHOT NITE 

(just what the doctor ordered) 

$1 SHOTS 

KAMIKAZIS ETC.. 




$1.25 SHOTS 

WATERMELONS ETC... 

$1.50 SHOTS 

B-52's ETC.. 

LATE NITE GRILLE 

GRILLE OPEN TIL 1 :00am 
NITELY 



619 N. 12lh, Aggieville 



Comedy Invasion 

Now every Monday & Tuesday 
at 9 p.m. 

Tonight 
Michael Floorwax 

Along with 

Henry Cho 

Teresa Roberts 

Sunset Grill 
This week's special 

10 oz. Sirloin $5.65 

(price includes potato, 
bread, and salad bar) 




Office 
539-4321 



531 N. Manhattan 



Bar 

539-9727 



ootoo 


03310 


03430 


Cl( 

01540 


>se 

09520 


00160 


03380 


03440 


07*50 


04560 


00340 


03390 


05460 


07*60 


09610 


003 ro 


03400 


05470 


07610 


09760 


ooa so 


03440 


055O0 


07*80 


097 90 


ooaao 


034 TO 


05510 


07*90 


09600 


ooaso 


03400 


05360 


07700 


09810 


009(0 


03490 


05570 


07720 


09820 


01250 


03500 


03540 


077 30 


09830 


01300 


03510 


05610 


07800 


04840 


01320 


03512 


05650 


07810 


09650 


013*0 


03513 


05640 


078 30 


09860 


01431 


03314 


05700 


07840 


09870 


01460 


01515 


06230 


0T85O 


04 ((0 


01430 


03516 


06240 


07860 


09890 


01440 


03530 


06320 


018 10 


09900 


01770 


03540 


06330 


01880 


09910 


01740 


03550 


06370 


07890 


09920 


01*40 


03560 


06360 


07920 


04930 


01950 


03570 


04400 


07950 


09940 


01990 


03500 


04410 


07410 


09930 


02000 


03410 


06430 


074 90 


09960 


02010 


03420 


06460 


06000 


09970 


02020 


034)0 


06470 


08010 


09980 


02110 


03640 


0*5 30 


080*0 


09940 


02240 


03660 


06550 


0(050 


10000 


02140 


03470 


06560 


0*070 


100 10 


02350 


034 BO 


0*510 


08040 


10020 


023*0 


03740 


06540 


06120 


10030 


02410 


03750 


06*10 


061*0 


1004 


02450 


03770 


06620 


0(190 


10030 


02*80 


037i0 


06*30 


0(220 


10060 


024 40 


03190 


06640 


0(290 


10070 


02140 


03000 


06*60 


0(420 


looeo 


02530 


O38S0 


0*610 


06660 


10090 


02540 


05040 


0**80 


08*70 


10100 


02740 


O5C70 


0*640 


08*90 


10110 


03250 


050 80 


0*700 


08839 


10120 


0J270 


05090 


06760 


06840 


10130 


03300 


05100 


06140 


8849 


10140 


03310 


05110 


0*800 


08S50 


10150 


03320 


03140 


06480 


08950 


10160 


03330 


05150 


070*0 


04060 


10170 


0334 2 


05190 


07310 


04130 


10180 


03343 


05210 


C7330 


09240 


10181 


03344 


05220 


07460 


043)0 


10182 


03345 


05210 


07440 


04350 


10199 


03344 


05250 


07300 


09*50 


10200 


03150 


05240 


01540 


0949O 


10210 


03340 


05420 


07550 


045 00 


10220 



Closed Classes — Fall 1987 



10210 
10240 
10250 
10260 
10270 
10271 
10272 
10260 
10290 
10)00 
1C31C 
103 20 
1C330 
10340 
10330 
10360 
10370 
103(0 
1C390 
10400 
10410 
10420 
10430 
10440 
1C430 
104*0 
10410 
104*0 
10490 
10500 
10510 
10520 
10330 
10531 
105 32 
10340 
10550 
10560 
10570 
10580 
10540 
10600 
10*10 
10*20 
10*30 
10*40 
I064C 
10TIO 
107BC 
10740 



10600 
10010 
10640 

loesc 

1086C 
10870 
10910 
10430 
10940 
10950 
109*0 
IC460 
10990 
11000 
11010 
11040 
11070 
11060 
11090 
11100 
11110 
11120 
11140 
11160 
11170 
111(0 
11140 
11310 
11340 
1 1 360 
11370 
11360 
11390 
11400 
11410 
11420 
11430 
1 1440 
11460 
114(0 
11490 
11510 
11330 
11530 
116*0 
11910 
11950 
119*0 
11490 
127*0 



12710 

12*50 

12*80 

12910 

13030 

1)0*0 

13090 

13)40 

133*0 

133(0 

13400 

13430 

134*0 

1)410 

134(0 

11550 

13620 

13*30 

13710 

13740 

13760 

13*90 

13450 

13970 

119(0 

14000 

14020 

14030 

140*0 

14050 

14010 

14080 

14100 

14210 

142(0 

14240 

14310 

14340 

14340 

14370 

143(0 

14410 

14420 

144)0 

14430 

14470 

1*510 

14320 

145)0 

1*5*0 



14571 
14572 
14373 
14374 
14373 
14516 
1431* 
145(0 
1*540 
14*71 
1*6*0 
14710 
1*713 
14714 
I47Z0 
14740 
14130 
141*0 
14740 
14*00 
14*70 
14*43 
14400 
14410 
14920 
14460 
14470 
149*0 
14490 
15000 
13030 
15100 
13130 
13131 
13132 
13133 
13150 
15290 
15)00 
15700 
15490 
162*0 
16240 
16350 
1*3*0 
l*40C 
16410 
16530 
16920 
17C1C 



1705 

11130 

111*0 

116SC 

11710 

11740 

17*10 

1*740 

1(910 

19000 

1401 

19030 

1904 

19050 

190*0 

14070 

19081 

19090 

19100 

19101 

191)0 

19160 

19150 

191*0 

14161 

19220 

19350 

14360 

14380 

14410 

1946C 

19480 

14490 

19510 

14520 

19530 

19360 

19610 

19*90 

19*00 

19880 

19400 

19910 

20120 

20130 

20140 

20150 

20180 

20260 

20270 



20520 

20530 

20540 

2O6O0 

20610 

20*10 

20*40 

20*10 

20760 

20830 

20*40 

20*50 

208*0 

20*10 

206*0 

20990 

21000 

21050 

21060 

21070 

21190 

21190 

21220 

21290 

21300 

21**0 

21*50 

214*0 

21470 

21510 

215*0 

21570 

21690 

22390 

221 1 

22120 

227*0 

22830 

22640 

228*0 

22*90 

2106C 

23190 

232)0 

23230 

23330 

25610 

23*50 

21661 



23682 

2)730 
23770 

237*0 

2)740 

23*00 

2)630 

23*40 

23(50 

2 3860 

2 3*10 

238*0 

2 3*90 

23910 

23460 

2 3400 

24000 

24010 

24020 

2 4050 

24060 

240*0 

2*090 

24100 

24110 

24120 

24130 

2*1*0 

2*170 

241*0 

24200 

24211 

24212 

2*2*0 

24300 

24420 

24340 

2*720 

2*730 

2*770 

24180 

24190 

24*00 

24810 

24690 

24930 

2 5000 

25130 

2 5140 

2 5210 



25320 
253)0 
25150 

29360 

25400 

25510 

25710 

25750 

23760 

25710 

257*0 

25790 

25*00 

25*20 

25610 

25*40 

25850 

25860 

25860 

25890 

25900 

25910 

25920 

25940 

25490 

25940 

25480 

25990 

26000 

26020 

26030 

2*050 

2*060 

26090 

26100 

24130 

261*0 

26170 

2*190 

2*200 

2*2*0 

26)10 

26340 

2*330 

2*3*0 

26)10 

263*0 

26390 

2*4 CO 

26*40 



26500 

24910 

26600 

266 70 

26700 

2*110 

26720 

2*740 

2*750 

247*0 

2*«00 

26*10 

26*30 

26*40 

26*70 

26910 

26920 

2*940 

27000 

27050 

270*0 

27090 

27100 

27210 

21290 

21310 

21440 

27465 

21510 

21*70 

2 7*80 

29330 

2*940 

29200 

24241 

24230 

29260 

24270 

242*0 

24290 

29300 

29310 

29120 

29330 

29)40 

29390 

243*0 

293*2 

29410 

24*20 



29**0 

24430 

24480 

29520 

299*0 

29550 

295*0 

29570 

29**1 

29650 

29*80 

29690 

29100 

24730 

297*0 

29750 

29790 

29810 

298(0 

29690 

29910 

29920 

29960 

29970 

30050 

30110 

30500 

30510 

30520 

30 590 

30*50 

30120 

31010 

11020 

31090 

11200 

31250 

11320 

31)10 

31**0 

31450 

11(30 

31(70 

11960 

11470 

32040 

32090 

12110 

322)0 

)2330 



)2S*C 

32*00 

32910 

129*0 

329)0 

32940 

33000 

3)010 

33020 

33030 

330*0 

33090 

33060 

3307C 

33090 

33 120 

33150 

33190 

3327C 

33290 

3)310 

13320 

33330 

33310 

33*20 

33*40 

33*30 

33**0 

33410 

3)480 

33650 

3)150 

33190 

33*10 

3 38 80 

139*0 

34020 

3*030 

3*0*0 

3*090 

34120 

3*200 

3*210 

3*240 

3*2*0 

3*2*0 

3*330 

3*360 

3*) 70 

3***0 



3**60 
34490 
34420 
34130 
3**10 
3**10 
3*900 
35000 
35010 
35020 
35030 
35*00 
15*10 
35630 
39*10 
35*20 
35(30 
3*120 
3611C 
1*180 
1*2)0 
3*250 
36310 
3*510 
1*600 
3*8*0 
1*650 
3*860 
3*8 71 
36900 
1*420 
36930 
36930 
11)40 
31*00 
)1390 
18030 
3(060 
36110 
38230 
3*310 
1*4*0 
3*4*0 




Maybe it's your calculator. 

It's certainly not an HP. 

A cheap calculator can cost you plenty. But a Hewlett- 
Packard pays. Time and again. And now through 
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KANSAS STATE COLLtOIAN, T 



25. 1987 



Telephone update 
nears completion 



By Pattf Paxson 
Staff Writer 



The final stages of installation 
of K-State's new telephone sys- 
tem will be completed by the end 
of the fall semester, said Robert 
Young, assistant director in Uni- 
versity computing and 
telecommunications. 

The new system, the American 
Telephone & Telegraph Co, Sys- 
tem 85 Private Branch Exchange, 
is costing K-State about $3 mil- 
lion to install, Young said. How- 
ever, the University will pay 
about the same basic monthly 
charges as it has in the past for 
telephone service. 

The project has proceeded in 
three stages: moving the Univer- 
sity telephone lines over to the 
System 85, rewiring all campus 
buildings and replacing all cam- 
pus telephones. The project began 
during the spring of 1986, Young 
said. 

Young said a primary advan- 
tage of the new telephone system 
is that "moves and changes 
(involving wiring and equipment) 
can be done more easily. We can 
do a lot of the changes less expen- 
sively than what Southwestern 
Bell or AT&T charges. K-State 
technicians will do the servicing." 

The new telephones have such 
features as touch-tone dialing, 
built-in speed dialing, built-in 
speakers, access to more lines and 



conference calling, Young said. 
Also, no one can break into a call, 
as was the case with the old 
telephones. 

Another problem with the old 
telephones was having to arrange 
the office around the phones 
instead of having the freedom to 
move the phones around the 
office, he said. 

"The new system is less expen- 
sive to maintain compared to the 
old system. The old wiring was 
too difficult to work around. The 
new wiring is more uniform and 
offers new capabilities," Young 
said. 

The switch-over to the System 
85 includes an eight-year, fixed- 
price contract, which protects the 
University against future price 
increases and will save money in 
the long run. Young said. 

The new telephone system at 
K-State is part of a statewide pro- 
ject to update telephone commu- 
nications in state offices. The Uni- 
versity of Kansas, The Wichita 
State University, Fort Hays Slate 
University, the University of Kan- 
sas Medical School and all state 
offices in Topeka will eventually 
be equipped with the System 85, 
Young said. 

The project is administered by 
the state's Division of Informa- 
tion Systems and Communica- 
tions; however, each site is 
responsible for the installation 
and servicing of its system. 



African mine delays firings 



19,000 
workers 
on strike 

By The Assocloted Press 

JOHANNESBURG, South Africa 
— South Africa's largest gold pro- 
ducer put off Monday for two days its 
threatened firing of 19,000 striking 
black miners. The death toll from 
nationwide, strike-related violence 
meanwhile rose to six. 

The strike, by hundreds of thou- 
sands of miners, entered its third 
week. 



Bobby Codscll, Anglo American 
Corp.'s director of industrial rela- 
tions, said in announcing a delay in 
the firings that a "significant" num- 
ber of workers had returned to work. 
He did not have exact figures on the 
number who went back. 

The National Union of Minework- 
crs denied there was a large-scale 
return to the mines. 

Godscll told a-news conference the 
decision by some strikers to return 
showed a growing number of miners 
believe "the strike has gone on long 
enough." 

Before the news conference, 
Anglo said it was firing about 7,000 
strikers at No. 2 and No. 3 shafts of 
its Western Holdings gold mine in 
ihc Orange Free State because the 
miners did not return to work by the 
Monday deadline. 



In a later statement, however, 
Anglo said it was extending the dead- 
line until Wednesday for the 7,000 
and for about 1 2,000 more strikers at 
two coal and two gold mines "to 
allow employees more time to con- 
sider their options." 

The company said the Monday 
deadlines were designed to "restore 
production to normal." 

Anglo and other companies fired 
about 9,000 striking workers last 
week. 

The miners strike is legal, but 
under South African labor law, com- 
panies may fire any worker who docs 
not report for work. 

Cyril Ramaphosa, general secret- 
ary of the union, says it would take 
the industry six months to hire and 
train replacements for the 340,000 
men the union says arc on strike at 45 



mines. 

The Chamber of Mines, which 
represents the six mining companies 
targeted by the strike, said Monday it 
estimates 210,000 miners arc on 
strike at 29 mines. 

Three more deaths were reported 
Monday. 

Three previous deaths have been 
linked to the strike. The union says 
more than 320 strikers were injured 
and 300 arrested since ihc strike 
began Aug. 9. 

Anglo, which produced more truin 
39 percent of Soulh Africa's gold last 
year, has been hardest hit of the 
major mining companies. 

It acknowledged losing substantial 
revenue because of the strike, but 
none of the mining companies pro- 
vided figures on the costs of the 
strike. 



Gadhafi vows to secure Waite's release 



By The Associated Press 

LONDON — The Libyan news 
agency has reported Libyan leader 
Col. Moammar Gadhafi has vowed 
to try to win the release of Anglican 
envoy Terry Waite, who disappeared 
in Lebanon on a mission to free U.S. 
hostages. 

In a report monitored Sunday in 
London, the state-run agency said 
Gadhafi made the pledge during a 
meeting with a representative of the 
Church of England identified only as 
a Dr. Lacey or a Dr. Lycc. 

But John Lytde, secretary for 
public affairs to Archbishop of Can- 



terbury, the Most Rev, Robert Run- 
cie, said the church was not aware of 
any meeting with Gadhafi. 

"We haven't sent anyone to talk 
with Col. Gadhafi but the Anglican 
Church is worldwide, so I'm not say- 
ing that Dr. Lacey or Dr. Lycc is not 
an Anglican," he said. "Any 
intervention that might be useful in 
bringing about the release of hos- 
tages would be welcome." 

J AN A said the Anglican represen- 
tative urged Gadhafi to intervene for 
the release of Waite, who dropped 
from sight in January, "in the name of 
the church and humanity." 

JANA said Gadhafi "stressed to 



the representative of the church that 
he would work for peace and exert all 
he can for the release of Terry 
Waite." 

No group has claimed to hold 
Waite. The Church of England 
expressed "extreme skepticism" on 



dp 1 



A/larch of 

Dimes 

SAVES BABIES 



Saturday about a Lebanese maga/inc 
report that he would be freed shortly 
after payment of a S5 million ransom 
In addition to Waite, 24 foreigners 
arc missing and believed kidnapped 
in Lebanon. They include nine 
Americans. 

""•haircut -hair color 




I UFM classes present variety 



By Jennifer Dorsch 
Staff Writer 

For those students already tired of 
the regular boring college courses, 
University for Man. 1221 Thurston 
SL, will be having registration for fall 
classes at the Union Thursday from 
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. 

UFM was started in the fall of 
1967 by a group of K-State faculty 
and students who wanted more than 
the usual campus classes. Eunice 
Dorst, campus/community coordina- 
tor for UFM, said the program here 
has been a model for similar "free" 
programs throughout the country. 

UFM classes offer a wide variety 
of topics and are open to anyone. 



There is a class fee which ranges 
from $4 to $10, depending on the 
content of the class and the number 
of class sessions. This fall, UFM has 
a take two classes, get one free offer. 

UFM has a $2 registration fee in 
addition to the class fee. However, 
full-time K-State students are 
exempt from the registration fee 
through an SGA allocation. 

UFM 'S fall schedule includes sev- 
eral classes that have never been 
offered in this area. The People's 
Law School is a series of classes con- 
ducted by local judges and attorneys 
to clarify legal mysteries and teach 
"the kind of law one should know to 
survive." Dorst said. 

Another new class, Socially 



Responsible Investing, will examine 
the impact of investments in compa- 
nies from a social and environmental 
viewpoint, rather than solely on com- 
pany performance. 

UFM is trying a new format by 
offering a weekend workshop. Creat- 
ing Our Own Reality. The two day 
class will deal with understanding a 
belief system and visualizing goals. 

The most popular UFM programs 
arc the nature, sports and self 
courses, Dorst said. Classes in these 
areas include a Tut lie Creek Tower 
Tour, Beginning Kung Fu and Dat- 
ing Relationships. 

The classes are taught by volun- 
teers, including K-State faculty, 
community professionals and others. 



Deadline for registration isusually 
two days before the class. However, 
early enrollment is encouraged when 
class materials need to be ordered or 
when there is a maximum number of 
participants, Dorst said. 

Course catalogs will be available 
at the Union bookstore. 

Registration will also be at the 
UFM house on Sunday from 2 p.m. 
to 4 p.m. After the scheduled 
registration times, enrollment may 
be done at the UFM house by mail or 
by calling 532-5866. 



Have story 
or photo ideas? 
CALL 532^56 



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Sept. 24, 25, 26. 30 
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FACULTY AND STAFF MEMBERS: 

Don't be left out of the 1987-1988 
K-State Campus Directory. 

Be sure to get your 1987-1988 K-State Campus Directory listing 
updated. Personnel Services provides the faculty /staff list for the 
directory and if individuals have not updated their records, the 
directory entry is inaccurate. We would Hke your assistance in 
updating the faculty /staff listings. 

The following information is needed for individual listings: name, 
home address, campus address, home phone, campus phone, faculty/ 
staff title, and office/department/division. 

Please take a few minutes to check last year's directory. If anything 
has changed, form PER 39 must be completed and submitted to 
Personnel Services by Aug. 28. Aug. 28 is also the deadline to submit 
individual "Personnel Appointment" forms (PER 39) for 
unclassified and classified individuals and GST forms for graduate 
student employees. 

Anyone wishing to withhold his or her name from the directory 
must submit a letter to Personnel Services by Aug. 28. 

If you have questions, please contact Sheila in Personnel 
Services, Employee Benefits and Records, 532-6277. 




^.^ 



MM 



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■^ . 



Editorial 



Kansas State Collegian ■ Tuesday, August 25, 1987 ■ Page 4 



Semester promises intriguing issues 



After a long and hot summer, I find myself 
sitting at a table, pen in hand, staring desp- 
erately at a threateningly blank pad of paper. 
The pad was purchased during the first week 
of my vacation, along with a pen, which when 
combined, were to produce a series of articles 
to enlighten and entertain this newspaper's 
readers. At the rate of one column per week, 
enough material would have been prepared to 
handle the coming semester. However, my 
ambitions — much like a certain ex- 
presidential candidate's political career — 
were worthless. With one difference, though, 
I blame procrastination, not my loins, for my 
misfortune. Not that there was ever a lack of 
consequential events to keep me busy during 
our three months of respite. No, not at all. 

To begin with, this summer we witnessed 
our nation being struck by a terrible disease 
which, if not researched and cured, could lead 
to an epidemic of disastrous proportions. I 
speak, fellow students, of the curious sick- 
ness known to a select group of experts as 
acute selective amnesia. The seriousness of 
this disease is magnified by the sad fact that it 
struck at the very top of our constitutionally 
— established pyramid of power. Yes, 1 
speak of no other than our noble president 
himself, Hollywood's own Ronald Wilson 
Reagan. 

The poor man was first noticed to suffer of 
this malady when he was unable to remember 



being told about any arms shipments to Iran. 
Later, he also could not recall knowledge of 
illegal Contra fund-raising by trusted admi- 
nistration aides and advisers. 

In summary, this is how the disease prog- 
ressed. Last November, he assured God- 
fearing television spectators that, "We did 
not — repeat, did not — trade weapons or 
anything else for hostages, nor will we." In 
March, he told us that despite hcartful mis- 
givings, his November statements were erro- 
neous. Once again last November, (a bad 
month for the poor man, I must admit) he was 
confident in stating no mistakes had been 
made in the Iran initiative, merely high-risk 
gambles warranted by die circumstances. In 
March, once more. >£ corrected himself by 
announcing that the Iran initiative was a mis- 
take and there were no excuses. 

During the summer. President Reagan also 
reversed his stance on knowledge of deci- 
sions being made to support the Nicaragua n 
"freedom fighters," by claiming ignorance of 
Lt. Col. Oliver North's role in the issue. 

Luckily though, progress is being made in 
curbing our gallant leader's sickness. I have 
heard, from a very credible source, the 
nation's leading scientists have urged the 
president to refrain from making statements 
during the month of November, and to seek a 
cooler climate during the summer months. 
The former is to avoid recurring mistakes in a 



Coffman will provide 
excellent leadership 



University President Jon Wefald 
made a sound choice Friday when he 
appointed James R. Coffman 
provost. 

Coffman replaces Owen Koeppe, 
who resigned to return to teaching. 
Koeppe will be a hard act to follow, 
but Coffman is able to do it. 

Coffman offers essential advan- 
tages that few other internal — and 
certainly no external — candidates 
could have provided. Primarily, he 
knows this University. 

He received all three of his 
academic degrees from K-State, and 
he has served as head of the Depart- 
ment of Surgery and Medicine and 
was dean of the College of Veterin- 
ary Medicine until his appointment 
as acting provost July 1 . That kind of 
experience makes Coffman the most 



logical choice. 

Coffman was appointed acting 
provost last spring after the four 
finalists culled from a national 
search bowed out of contention. 
Although Wefald could have begun 
another national search over the 
summer, it would have been illogical 
because of the support Coffman 
already enjoyed. 

As Wefald said, a national search 
would have seemed "rigged" to out- 
side candidates. 

In addition to Coffman's experi- 
ence at K-State, he also knows what 
a land-grant university is and what it 
should be. That intuition, especially 
in these days when agriculture is 
ever-changing, is vital. 

James Coffman should do a fine 
job in his new capacity. 



State should suspend 
unfair hiring process 



Many people found it impossible 
to get a temporary summer job from 
the Kansas Department of Transpor- 
tation. They were not eligible 
because their names were not on a 
list the county departments received 
from the state. 

The allegation is mat the state 
asked local Republican leaders to 
compile a list of those who might be 
interested in summar work, and send 
the list to the state departments. The 
state than sent the list to the local 
offices. It was not a coincidence that 
the names on the lists were mostly 
Republican. People who did not get 
on the list did not get the jobs. 

The Legislative Post Audit Com- 
mittee was asked to investigate the 
procedure, but so far it has decline. 
Some legislatures said an audit 
would only reveal what everybody 
knows — die party in power hires on 
the basis of political affiliation. The 



committee has two more meetings to 
decide if the issue is worth an 
investigation. 

The legislatures would do well in 
remembering it was these types of 
hiring practices that got President 
McKinley shot. After the assisina- 
tion, federal laws were changed to 
prevent extensive partisan hiring 
practices. 

Hiring on the basis of political 
affiliation is decriminitory just like 
hiring on the basis of religious 
beliefs or ethnic backgrounds — and 
it is no more acceptable. 

Merit should be the most impor- 
tant factor in hiring, and the trans- 
portation department — like all 
departments — would be more effi- 
cient if it hired the best people quali- 
fied. Lf laws are not already in place 
to prevent this from happening, than 
the Legislature should work to stop 
the unfair practice. 



Kansas State Collegian 



EDITOR 

Deron Johnson 
MANAGING EDITOR 

Becky Lucas 

NEWS EDITOR 

Jeff Bielscr 



EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR 

Christine Doll 
PHOTO/GRAPHICS EDITOR 

John Thelandcr 
ADVERTISING MANAGER 

Judy Goetz 



EDITORIAL BOARD: Judd Annis, Kirk Caraway. Jenny Chaulk, Christine Doll. 
Michael Kruegcr, Deron Johnson, Candy Leonard, Becky Lucas, Judy Lundsirom, 
Michael Nichols. Paui Paxson. Chad Sanborn 

TIIECOLLECUN<USFS»l MO) u publiihed by Student PubUcMtoni Ire . K»fu« Sum Uiuveniiy.diily Junnj thef.U 
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Commentary 




Michael 
Nichols 

i^ Collegian 
r Columnist 



month he has proven to be unstable, and the 
latter has something to do with the effect of 
the sun and a diminishing ozone layer on the 
president's brain. 

This summer we also saw the emergence 
of a national hero. From the frazzled 
remnants of the infamous Iran-Contra hear- 
ings. North became a martyr in the eyes of 
America. A hard-working and devout sol- 
dier, North represents a role model for the 
American male. Despite illegal fund solicit- 
ing practices and lies to Congress, 01 lie 
proved criminal immunity can be achieved 
by looking the camera straight in the eye and 
telling Americans how much he loves this 



country. Thank God Charles Manson didn't 
have the same idea. 

But while Lt. Col. North's popularity 
reached staggering heights, many Americans 
were chagrined at the demise of a prominent 
political career. Presidential candidate Gary 
Hart, uncontaminaicd, as he is, by a minimal 
degree of common sense, provided this 
nation with an important precedent. Had he 
sold weapons to Iran, military secrets to the 
Soviet Union, or diverted government funds 
to secret Swiss hank accounts, Hart would 
probably not have received the same publ ici- 
ly as he did early this summer for sleeping 
with a dizzy model. 

But, being the noble person that he is. Hart 
chose to ignore the free publicity his sexual 
escapades brought him, and withdrew his 
candidacy. However, for all those diehard 
Hart fans out ihcrc, rumor has it that he will 
run again in '92. as soon as he finds a match- 
ing Kennedy clone to be his vice president. 

Many other interesting things happened 
this summer, from increasing American 
involvement in the Persian Gulf to two diffe- 
rent peace proposals in Central America. 
Very recently, American journalist Charles 
Glass escaped from a Shiitc Muslim terrorist 



group which had kept him hostage for two 
months. More importanUy, though. Donna 
Rice and Fawn Hall have both recently sold 
the rights of their stories to television. 

Locally. Gov. Mike Haydcn is catling for a 
special meeting of the Kansas Legislature to 
discuss highway repairs and he appointed a 
commission to establish the groundwork for 
pari-mutucl belting in Kansas. Even closer lo 
home, the Department of Journalism and 
Mass Communications lost its accreditation, 
which may turn into a nuisance for some stu- 
dents; but then again it may not, for a number 
of the nation's top journalism schools arc not 
accreditatcd. 

So, what docs the remainder of the year 
hold in store for this country? Is Jim Bakkcr 
going to give up the church and instead opt 
for a musical career? Or will he team up with 
Oliver North for a prime-time sit-com spot? I 
can see it clearly, Ollic playing die straight 
man, cloaking himself in injured virtue at the 
brunt of Jim's flaky puns. Maybe Jerry Fal- 
wcll will become a candidate for the '88 elec- 
tions and assassination attempts will become 
fashionable. I don't know. Reaching into my 
inexhaustible bag of cliches. 1 guess only 
time will tell. 




Media often overlook winners 



During the "dog days" of August, when the 
blistering heal seems to stifle ihc newsmak- 
ing ability of Americans, a most remarkable 
event occurred this year — two baseball 
pitchers, noi one. were caught with the tools 
of baseball-scuffing on them in the span of a 
single week. 

For years siorics had circulated about fore- 
ign objects being hidden on certain pitchers, 
which allowed them to do certain things lo a 
baseball, which in turn drove certain baiters 
crazy. Even the Kansas City Royals, with an 
image as clean as their ballpark, signed Gay- 
lord Perry a few years back, apparently on the 
theory a baseball team needed to have at least 
one ball-altering expert on its staff if it was 
ever to gain respectability among the big 
boys. 

Even more amazing than catching the 
players with "the goods," (sandpaper in both 
cases) was their and the media's reaction to 
the revelation. The Phils' Kevin Gross said 
he was just "fooling with" the sandpaper 
found in his glove. "I didn't use it," he said. 

Joe Nickro, the Minnesota Twins pitcher 
caught with an emery board and sandpaper on 
him, became a celebrity worthy of a spoi on 
ihe David Lettcrman "Late Night" TV show. 
N ickro said he inadvertantly left his manicure 
set, the tools of the trade for a knuckle pitch- 
er, in his hip pocket. Other observers hypo- 
thesized he had them in his glove and pulled a 
quick switch worthy of David Coppcrfield, 
the magician. 

True, both pitchers paid for their "sins" 
with 1 0-day suspensions, but Nickro offset 
his with six whirlwind hours in the Big 
Apple. He flew first-class, rode in a shiny 
white limousine, rubbed elbows with televi- 
sion producers, went onc-on-onc with ihc 
king of late-night television, and collected 
$520 for his troubles. He is now mulling over 
endorsement offers from an abrasive manu- 
facturer and a manicure company. At this 
point in his career, what more could an over- 
Ihc-hill baseball pitcher ask for? 



Commentary 




Judd 

Annis 



Collegian 
Columnist 



But baseball is a game of winners and los- 
ers. For every victory chalked up by a scuff- 
ball expert, there is a loss suffered by another 
pitcher, possibly equally la'cnied. Some 
younger player struggling to avoid a trip back 
to the minors sees another victory dance 
away on a baseball defying the laws of phys- 
ics in his adversary's hands. The integrity of 
"America's game" died a little every time a 
pitcher got away with deliberately scuffing 
up the ball, and die media seems to accept it 
as part of ihc game or a chance to increase its 
share of the market. 

Docs the problem lie with the game of 
baseball or with the media? "We only print 
the news, we don't make it," is the standard 
media response. That philosophy has been 
debated for years and the issue of scuffed 
baseballs hardly seems worthy of renewing 
the question. On the other hand, the policing 
mechanism of baseball caught the culprits 
and punished them in a meaningful way, so 
how can we fault the game? 

Alan Page, the former Minnesota Vikings 
all -pro lineman who earned a law degree in 
his off-seasons, hit the nail on the head a few 
years hack when he observed that organized 
sports do not build character, but retard the 
natural development of it From the moment 
youngsters start to play organized sports, 
ihcy have someone else, an umpire or referee, 
lo set the limits of their sportsmanship. Page 



observed that youths are taught to play right 
up to the limit set by the official. When they 
go too far, they arc penalized, but they should 
let the official decide how far is too far. 

Public pressure can effect a change in atti- 
tude in athletes in organized sports and their 
fans. But will it ever happen? The baseball 
player who dives for the flyball and watches 
the umpire rule it a fair catch knows whether 
he trapped it or not. He doesn't need "instant 
replay" lo tell him most of the lime. How 
would the fans react if he contradicted the 
umpire and announced he had indeed trapped 
the ball? Would his team's fans give him a 
round of applause for being honest? Would 
his teammates run him off the field? 

It used to be in tennis that if the umpire 
missed a call in favor of a player, that player 
would deliberately "waste" the next shot to 
even things up again. But tennis is not a team 
sport in the sense of baseball or football, so it 
is not a perfect example of the acceptance of 
personal integrity over win-at -all -costs. 

Perhaps the best that can be salvaged from 
Ihc scuff ball incidents is an acknowledge- 
ment that organized sports arc public specta- 
cles and no more. They are not builders of 
character or a measure of character, either of 
individuals or of a team. The participants are 
no more role models for American youth than 
the traders of Wall Street. Some arc "good 
people" and some are "bad people", with a 
regulator of some son setting the limits of 
acceptable behavior in both cases. 

Real character is built, for example, on the 
sandlots, where if you cheat you aren't asked 
to play next time. The same holds true in per- 
sona! relationships, where if you lie and cheat 
you are going to find yourself without 
friends. 

So. for the moment let us hope Nickro and 
Gross suffer a fate even worse than a losing 
record or a high ERA, and that enthusiasts 
who plan sports award dinners extend an 
invitation to Alan Page, an all -pro on and off 
the field. 



► ^— .— ■* 



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mtmtk 



mim 



State drops Winfield charges 



KAMlAt OTAT1 COLHOIAN, Tu — day, 



25, 1M7 



^/^'•^.••v Evidence lacking, 

Stephan believes 



TOPEKA — Three of four crim 
nal charges filed against two former 
employees of Winfield State Hospi- 
tal and Training Center have been 
dropped, Attorney General Robert T. 
Stephan announced Monday. 

The two former employees, Bob- 
by Follener, 33 and Robert Vardy, 40, 
both of Arkansas City, had faced 
charges connected with the alleged 
mistreatment of patients at the slate's 
largest hospital for the mentally 
retarded. Stephan said in a statement 
he dropped the charges because his 
pre-trial investigation found insuffi- 
cient evidence to continue 
prosecution. 

A single count each of mistreat- 
ment of a confined person and bat- 



tery against Vardy were dropped. A 
single count of battery against Folk- 
ner was dropped, and he still faces a 
second count of battery. The charges 
are misdemeanors. 

Stephan said in each case, the prin- 
cipal witness could not say on exact- 
ly which day the alleged mistreat- 
ment took place, and there were no 
additional witnesses or physical evi- 
dence prosecutors could use. 

Stephan also sent a letter to Win- 
ston Barton, state secretary of social 
and rehabilitation services, saying 



the hospital should improve its abuse 
reporting procedures. 

Specifically, Stephan suggested 
reports of abuse be filed with SRS 
officials in Topeka and not through 
hospital supervisors. He also said 
employees and others who think they 
have witnessed patient abuse should 
be required to fill out detailed forms. 

"If we are to salvage something 
from this experience ... it should be 
that we learn that our reporting 
mechanisms for dealing with possi- 
ble cases of abuse and neglect were 



very inadequate at Winfield State 
Hospital," Stephan said in his letter. 
The charges were filed in March in 
Cowley County District Court, but a 
month later, Cowley County District 
Attorney Douglas Wright asked Ste- 
phan to take over the prosecution of 
the cases because of an alleged con- 
flict he had with the judge hearing the 
case. 

A third former employee, Martha 
Cole, 49, of Winfield, was found 
innocent last month of charges she 
abused physically abused patients. 

Problems at Winfield first came to 
light in February, when federal 
inspectors levied allegations that 
patients at the hospital were being 
physically abused by some hospital 
staff members. 



FAA chief to review pilot training 



By The Associated Ptots 

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — The head 
of the Federal Aviation Administra- 
tion will meet in Kansas City Thurs- 
day with chief pilots of the nation's 
airlines as part of a review of pilot 
training by air carriers. 

FAA Administrator T. Allan 
McArtor said the meeting is part of a 
"total top-to-bottom reassessment of 
our pilot training, our crew coordina- 
tion procedures" by large airlines and 
commuter operations. 

McArtor' s remarks were made in 
an interview Sunday on ABC -TV's 
"This Week With David Brinkley." 

Bob Raynesford, FAA regional 



spokesman in Kansas City, said 
Monday that about 300 invitations 
were sent to the meeting, scheduled 
to begin at 1:30 p.m. CDT at the 
Wcstin Crown Center Hotel. Ray- 
nesford said McArtor, other FAA 
officials and leaders of aviation asso- 
ciations would meet with reporters 
after the session. 

Jo Ann Sloane, an FAA spokes- 
woman in Washington, stressed that 
the meeting was not prompted by the 
recent Northwest Airlines crash in 
Detroit that killed 156 people. 

Shortly after assuming his duties 
as FAA chief last month, McArtor 
announced plans for a nationwide 
pilot training review. The move 



came after the FAA initiated an 
examination of training programs at 
Delta Air Lines because of several 
mistakes by its pilots in a period of 
several weeks, including an incident 
in which two jetliners came within 
100 feet of colliding over the North 
Atlantic. 

"He's looking at things like pilot 
training, crew coordination and pro- 
fessionalism," Ms. Sloane said. By 
talking direcdy with the pilots, she 
said, "he's trying to get down to the 
nitty gritty." 

She said Kansas City was chosen 
because of its central location and 
because it has a regional FAA office. 

John Mazor, a spokesman for the 



Air Line Pilots Association in 
Washington, said the meeting was a 
good start but said he hoped McArtor 
would talk eventually to a broader 
range of people than the chief pilots. 

Chief pilots at the larger airlines, 
he said, function more as executives 
than cockpit crewmen. 

"What ne wants to do is to beef up 
training and qualifications for pilots, 
and we certainly would endorse that 
kind of an effort," Ma/or said. 

'The only concern we have... is 
that we would not want this to be a 
(matter of) simply calling everybody 
in and giving them a pep talk on, 
'Hey, you guys have to listen up and 
fly right,*" Mazor said. 



Evidence confirms Hess' cause of death 



By TTt Assocloted Press 

BERLIN — British authorities 
declared officially Monday that 
Rudolph Hess hanged himself, and 
his family said the 93-year-old last 
survivor of Adolf HiUer's inner 
circle was buried secretly. They 
would not reveal where or when. 

The family lawyer said the former 
deputy fuehrer's son, Wolf- 
Ruediger, suffered a stroke and was 
hospitalized in Munich. 

Revising an earlier statement, 
British military authorities said evi- 
dence showed Hess hanged himself 
Aug. 17 with an electrical extension 
cord in WesLBerlin's Spandau pris- 



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on, where he was sole inmate 

British military authorities said 
previously that Hess was found with 
"an electrical cord around his neck," 
but did not mention hanging. 

News of a secret burial came ini- 
tially from Mayor Karl Walter of 
Wunsiedel, a village in northern 
Bavaria where the Hess family has a 
burial plot, 

Andrea Hess, wife of Wolf- 
Ruediger, said her father-in-law had 
been buried but refused to say more. 

"I can confirm that the burial of 
Rudolf Hess has taken place," she 
told The Associated Press. 

Walter said Hess was "definitely 
not" buried in his village, where ser- 



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vices had been expected Wednesday. 

Police arrested about 100 neo- 
Nazis in Wunsiedel over the 
weekend for demonstrating and dis- 
playing Nazi signs. Many wore 
swastikas and chanted the Nazi 
salute "Sicg Heil!" (Hail to Victory). 

Walter expressed surprise that 
Hess was buried secreUy. Members 
of the family had told him they 
intended to fulfill the former Nazi 
leader's wish to be buried in the fam- 
ily plot. 

He had said earlier he was afraid 
burial in Wunsiedel would make the 
village a pilgrimage spot for Nazi 
sympathizers. 

Hess flew to Britain in 1941 on 



what he described as a mission to 
make a separate peace between Bri- 
tain and Germany. He had been in 
prison since, and was sentenced to 
life at the Nuremburg trials in 1946 
for war crimes. 

He was guarded at Spandau in 
month- long turns by soldiers of the 
four World War II Allies: the United 
States, Soviet Union, Britain and 
France. The fortress- like prison, now 
to be demolished, is in West Berlin's 
British sector. 

Wolf-Rucdiger Hess, 50, was 
taken to a hospital intensive care unit 
in Munich after his wife found him 
unconscious in the if apartment Sun- 
day evening, SeidI said. 



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Highway killings 
persist, claim life 



By The Associated Press 

LOS ANGELES — Californi- 
a's roadway violence claimed its 
fifth death of the summer when a 
woman shot in an apparently 
motiveless attack as she rode on 
an inner-city street last week died 
without regaining consciousness. 

Shortly after Debbie Ann Scott 
of Pasadena died Sunday night, 
another driver was critically 
wounded in the same streets of 
south-central Los Angeles, where 
gang members frequently act out 
their rivalries in so-called drive- 
by shootings. 

Anthony Bonilla, 20, was shot 
Sunday night and was in critical 
condition today, Sgt. John Kinard 
said. He lost control of the car and 
crashed. No arrests had been 



made by early today, Kinard said. 
"We have no witnesses, so 
without being able to talk to him, 
we don't know whether it was a 
traffic-related shooting or if 
somebody fired at him from off 
the street, or even that it was gang- 
or narcotics-related," Kinard said. 

Scott, 26, of Pasadena was crit- 
ically wounded Aug. 16 while rid- 
ing in the cab of a pickup truck in 
south-central Los Angeles. 

Authorities also reported that a 
highway patrolman was fired on 
from a truck Saturday, and three 
people were arrested. 

Meanwhile, Gov. George 
Dcukmejian launched a S29 mil- 
lion offensive against the rash of 
attacks on the state's highways 
and byways. 



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Kansas State Collegian ■ Tuesday, August 25, 1987 ■ Page 6 



Course reviews for CPA exam 

A course reviewing the certified public accountant exam will be 
Sept. 3 to Oct. 31, Tuesdays and Thursdays from 7 to 9:30 p.m. and 
Saturdays 8 a.m. to noon. 

The review includes three sections: "Theory and Practice," "Law" 
and "Auditing." 

Gleim and Delaney CPA Examination Review Manuals, 1987 
Edition, are required for each section. Students can register for the 
review at the Division of Continuing Education office, Umbergcr 
317. 

Computer courses stress uses 

The needs of professionals, students and children will he 
addressed in computer courses offered this fall through Continuing 
Education. 

Course topics include "Introducing the Personal Computer," 
"Using the Personal Computer," "LOTUS 1-2-3" Level 1 and 2, 
"dBASE 111 PLUS" Level 1 and 2, "WORDPERFECT Level 1 and 
2, "Understanding and Using WORDSTAR," "Young People and 
the Personal Computer" and "Business Software." 



Funds dwindle; 
retailers profit 



Students' August return 
boosts local retail sales 



By Deron Johnson 
Edftor 



August means higher revenue for 
Manhattan businesses — a lot high- 
er. The higher revenue, of course, is a 
direct correlation to the beginning of 
the fall semester at K-State. 

If s the tons of money that students 
pack to bring with them in the fall. 
Savings, loans, scholarships, grants, 
piggy banks and Mom and Dad are 
all sources for the beginning-of-the- 
semester monies. But where does 
that money go so quickly? 

Well, there are those trips to Wal- 
Mart that are oh-so-ncccssary. And 
don't forget the checks for tuition, 
books and August rent 

Even after paying the major 
expenses, there always seems to be 
an abundance of money sitting in my 
ever-so-accessible checking 
account. But an abundance of money 
can be any amount over $ 1 — or the 
required minimum balance. 

During the first month, there 
always seems to be plenty of money, 
but be wary college students, for the 
merchants are more than happy to 
help lighten your load. 

Utilizing innovative marketing 
ploys, stores tend to call attention to 
every little thing a student could pos- 
sibly need. For example, what's a 
college student without notebooks, 
pens, a desk, a lamp or even a new 
car? And what about those multi- 
colored highlighters that are guaran- 
teed to help improve your GPA? 
Need I go on? And all of those beaut- 



Money Martters 


nPBS 


BECKY 
LUCAS 


Managing 
Editor 



iful displays have big, bright red 
signs shouting "special" or "dis- 
count." Interpretation: "Hey you, 
buy me!" 

Businessmen bless those checking 
accounts and parents daily. Short of 
cash? Write a check. I'll hope later 
that my basic math skills are holding 
true and that 1 balance my checkbook 
corrccUy. 

And now September is around the 
comer. The rent check will be due, 
the first phone and electric bill will 
arrive, and the money will begin to 
dwindle. Suddenly, I remember that 
by November I'll be waiting for that 
Happy Thanksgiving card from 
Grandma — complete with a $5 
check. And by December, I'll be 
looking around my apartment at 
those necessities that I bought, wish- 
ing that I could have the money back. 

So beware students — the lean 
months are just around the comer and 
Wal-Mart is just down the street. 



Christmas in August. 
That's how at least one Manhattan 
merchant describes the local retail 
climate when K-State students flock 
back to fall classes. 

"It definitely is Christmas in 
August," said Dennie Anderson, 
manager of Wal-Mart, 628 Turtle 
Creek Blvd. "We'll do the same (bus- 
iness) this week as we do the first 
week in December," he said early last 
week. 

Not only does Anderson have to 
hire 30 to 35 additional employees to 
handle the rush, but store profits in 
August shoot up nearly 30 percent 
over July figures. 

"We always notice a targe increase 
in sales in August over previous sum- 
mer months," he said. 

So far this month, the store is 
experiencing a 10 percent to 12 per- 
cent increase over August 1986 
sales, Anderson said. He speculated 
that the increase may mean an 
increased student enrollment this 
fall. Official enrollment figures are 
scheduled to be released today. 

Tom Whalert, general manager of 
the Manhattan Chamber of Commer- 
ce, said tax revenues increase notab- 
ly when students return to 
Manhattan. 

"Obviously, when 16,000 people 
come back to town it's going to make 
a big difference in sales tax 
revenues," he said. 

Bill Jacoby, executive director of 
the Aggieville Merchants Associa- 




Sttff/Miry Wird 



lion, said the students' impact is 
greatest the first 30 days of school. 

"It slays strong at least for 30 
days," he said. "It stays extremely, 
extremely strong." 

And Aggieville merchants recog- 
nize the importance of capturing the 
student market. The Association 
plans more promotions during the 
fall than any other season, Jacoby 
said. 

"We just start high energy stuff," 
he said. "From now through Christ- 
mas, we hit it as hard as we do all 
year." 

Jacoby believes the initial promo- 
tions are vital. 

"If you're going to capture (the 
students), you capture them in the 
first 30 days," Jacoby said. 

Perhaps no one knows that better 
than local radio stations. Ed Klimek, 
general manager of KQLA-FM, said 
the listener turnover every fall pre- 
sents a challenge to all radio stations. 

"If you don't have good listener- 
ship in the university market, your 
ratings are going to be low," he said. 

"One of the big factors is you've 
got about one-third of the student 
population new to the school who 
haven't been exposed to the market," 
Klimek said. "First impressions are 
very important." 

August rivals December for adver- 
tising revenue, he said. 

"I would put August and Decem- 
ber as our two biggest months of the 
year," he said. "August is a very, very 
big time for radio." 

While University officials will be 
anxiously anticipating fall enroll- 
ment figures, so will Manhattan 
merchants. 

"Enrollment affects us drastical- 
ly," Jacoby said. "The average stu- 
dent is going to spend $700 to $ 1 .000 
a month. If you take 3,000 students 
out of the community at S 1 ,000 each, 
that's $3 million you're losing," 

Local cable television services ' 
experience significant increases in 
August 

Dan Hebert, manager of Manhat- 
tan Cable TV Services Inc., said 
cable TV hook-ups increase about 10 
percent in August. Most of the new 
subscribers are students, he said. 

"We bring in additional people 
from outside systems (to handle the 
demand)," Hebcrt said. All perma- 
nent employees concentrate on new 




Illuitraiion by Giiy Lytic 

K-State students are flocking back to school and local retailers to stock 
up on essentials. Some Manhattan merchants say August sales will 
increase almost 30 percent over July, 



hook-ups, and about six extra 
employees are hired to accommodate 
the rush. 

Harry Watts, district manager- 
community relations for Southwest- 
ern Bell out of Salina, said new tele- 



phone connections increase three- 
fold in August over July. 

In July 1986, 853 new access lines 
were installed compared to 2.466 in 
August. In September 1986, 688 new 
lines were installed, Watts said. 




Town Center's planners aim 
to retain shopper's money, 
revitalize downtown sector 



SufT/Jim I 

Burton Garett, employed by E. Dunn and Sons Inc., installs the letter "D" of the Dillard's department 
store on the outside of the Manhattan Town Center. Dillard's is one of the two anchor stores in the 
mall, which is set to open Oct, 26. 



By Janet Swanson 

Agrl/Buslness Editor 

Two- thirds of the money spent by 
area shoppers is being spent out of 
town. A fact that the Manhattan 
Town Center is intending to reverse. 

"Forest City looked at the amount 
of money that was leaving Manhat- 
tan and found that only a third of it 
was staying in town," said Mickey 
Thompson, advertising and market- 
ing director for the Center. "We 
intend to keep that money that was 
leaving here." 

More than 10 years of planning 
and $24 million will culminate with 
the opening of the Center on Oct. 
26. 

Forest City Development of 
Cleveland and JCP Realty, subsidi- 
ary of J.C. Penney Co. Inc., of New 
York are partners in the 
development. 

"The support we have received 
from the community has just been 
incredible," said Susan Valentine, 
group marketing and advertising 
director for Forest City. 

The Center, the first enclosed 
retail shopping center in the area, 
will feature 88 retailers and a food 
court with seating for 500. 

"1 think, if anything, we need to 
strengthen the food court area and 
add a children's clothing store," 
said Thompson. 

The mall's search for a large 
restaurant has encountered stum- 



bling blocks, said Thompson. Most 
require a market of 250,000 before 
adding a branch, but the mall's pro- 
jected market is 180,000. 

"We want some type of cafeteria- 
restaurant that will serve a full line, 
including alcohol," she said. 

Retail space in the mall is more 
than 70 percent full, 20 percent 
more than what Forest City consid- 
ers successful for a grand opening. 

"We are right on target. You nev- 
er open at 100 percent," said 
Valentine. 

"We want some type of 
cafeteria -restaurant that 
will serve a full line, 
including alcohol." 

—Susan Valentine 

Although some of the stores will 
be moving from downtown to the 
mall, Thompson said it will be an 
incentive for the remaining down- 
town merchants. 

"It will cause some vacancies at 
first, but it will also create more 
traffic in the downtown area," said 
Thompson. 

She added that a proposal to con- 
struct the mall on the outskirts of 
town was dropped because of the 
negative impact it would have on 
the downtown area. 

"We see it as an evolution of 
downtown," Thompson said. 

The 80,000-square fool building 



will be anchored by J.C. Penney 
and Dillard's, with the possible 
addition of a third anchor at a later 
dale. Negotiations are in process 
with Sears for the creation of that 
third anchor. 

"We hate to say that anything is 
definite until we have something on 
paper," said Thompson. 

Should a third anchor be con- 
tracted. Thompson said that con- 
struction on the addition would 
probably wait until next February to 
avoid large-scale construction dur- 
ing the Christmas season. 

The complex, built on a 36-acre 
site, is expected to employ 640 peo- 
ple full- and part-time. 

Shops presently leasing space in 
the mall are: Amigo's, Better 
Homes & Gardens, Brass Buckle, 
Braun's Fashions, Burke's Shoes, 
Butterfield's, Card Shark, Carousel, 
Claire's Boutique, Com Dog on a 
Slick, CP1 Photo Finish, Dillard's, 
Foot Locker, Gordon's Jewelers, 
Hot Dogs & More, Inside Scoop, 
J.C. Penney, Kay Bee Toys, K-G 
Men's Store, Kinney Shoes, Lane 
Bryant, Lemer, The Limited, Little 
Kings, Mastcrcuts, Maurice's, Mer- 
ry Go Round, Mrs. Powell's, 
Musicland, The Nut Hut, Original 
Cookie, Paylcss Shoe Source, Pet- 
land, The Picture Show, Regis Hair- 
stylists, Royal Optical, Runza, Salu- 
tations, Sbarro Italian Eatery, Scotts 
LTD, Seifcrts. Sports Page, Ups-n- 
Downs and Waldenbooks. 



MMMi 



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IWItW tTATl COUIOHN, Tu— — T, 



25, 19*7 



Jury chosen in Anderson case 



Trial beginning 
in district court 



By The Associoted Press 

TOPEKA — A federal jury of five 
men and three women was picked 
Monday to hear an insurance com- 
pany's claim it should not have to 
pay the children of Lonta Anderson 
Eidhdge under a life insurance poli- 
cy she took out on her first husband 
before he was killed in 1983. 

Attorneys for New England Mutu- 
al Life Insurance Co. and lawyers for 
four children of Eldridgc and the late 



Martin K. Anderson will deliver 
opening statements to the jury Tues- 
day morning, then begin calling 
witnesses. 

The witness list, read to the jury 
Monday, sounded like a who's who 
from the highly publicized Loma 
Anderson-Rev. Thomas Bird case in 
Emporia, which was the subject of a 
television mini-series aired earlier 
this year. 

Bird is among scheduled witnes- 
ses, along with other principals in the 



case and taw enforcement officers 
who investigated it 

Judge Dale E. Saffcls of Kansas 
City, Kan., who is hearing the insur- 
ance case in federal district court 
here, said he expects the trial to con- 
tinue into next week. 

This is a civil case, with New Eng- 
land Mutual suing Eldridgc, alleging 
fraud and deceit on her part. The 
company contends she purchased the 
insurance policy because she 
planned to murder her husband or 
cause him to be murdered. 

New England Mutual is asking the 
court to declare the insurance policy 
void so it does not have to pay 
$120,000 in death benefits provided 
under its provisions, The policy also 
was (o pay an additional $150,000 if 
Anderson died by "accidental bodily 



Spending outpaces income 
for two consecutive months 



By The Associoted Press 

WASHINGTON Consumer 

spending, bolstered by brisk auto 
sales and exceptional air condition- 
ing costs, soared 0.9 percent in July 
for the second month in a row, more 
than twice as fast as incomes grew, 
the government reported Monday. 

The Commerce Department said 
that personal income was also up, but 
more modestly: 0.4 percent in July 
compared to 0.3 percent gains in May 
and June. It was the biggest income 
gain since a 0.6 percent advance in 
April. 

With the growth of spending far 
outpacing the growth in incomes, 
Americans dipped deeper into their 
savings to make up the difference. 

Personal savings, the ratio of sav- 
ings to after-tax income, fell to 2.8 
percent in July, down from 3.3 per- 
cent in June and from the 4.3 percent 
rate for all of 1986. 

'The consumer has adapted very 
well to not saving any money," said 
David Wyss, chief financial econom- 
ist for Data Resources Inc. in Lexing- 
ton, Mass. "One may wonder how 
long this can continue, but it appears 
low savings rates will be with us for a 
while." 

Despite the low savings, Mon- 
day's report was greeted by econom- 
■ 



ists as a strong sign for the economy 
and an indication that the nearly five- 
year-old economic expansion is still 
continuing. 

Consumer spending makes • up 
roughly two thirds of the gross 
national product. 

"We've got a rebound in consumer 
spending going, but a small one," 
said Sandra Shaber, an economist 
with the Futures Group, a Washing- 
ton consulting business. 

"But we should be cautious. This 
rebound is self-limiting. We have the 
low savings rate, high debt burdens 
and small wage gains. For many peo- 
ple, incomes are not even keeping up 
with inflation," Ms. Shaber added. 

Inflation for the first seven months 
of 1987 has been running at an annu- 
al rate of 5 percent, based on the con- 
sumer price index. 

Analysts said that the heat wave in 
many parts of the nation this summer 
contributed to the brisk spending fig- 
ures as electricity bills surged. 

Automobile sales also remained 
high, as dealers offered price and 
financing bargains to clear their lots 
before the introduction of 1988 
models. 

The two months of 0.9 percent 
consumer spending increases fol- 
lowed a 0.2 percent gain in May. The 
twin gains were the highest'since a 



2.3 percent surge in February. 

Personal consumption spending, 
which includes nearly everything 
except interest payments on debt, 
rose at an annual rate of $25.6 billion 
in July following an increase of $26 .9 
billion in June. 

In July, Americans were spending 
at the equivalent of an annual season- 
ally adjusted rate of $2.99 trillion, up 
from $2.97 trillion in June, the agen- 
cy said. 

Purchases of durable goods, items 
expected to last three years or more, 
increased $5.9 billion from June to 
July to an adjusted annual rate of 
$418 billion. It is this category that 
includes automobiles. 

In June, durable good purchases 
had increased $9.8 billion. Tor an 
annual adjusted rate of $412 billion. 

Purchases of nondurable goods 
increased $5.9 billion in July to an 
annual adjusted rate of $992 billion. 

Purchases of services, a broad 
category which includes everything 
from electricity costs to housing and 
restaurant meals, rose $14.5 billion 
in July to an annual rate of $1.23 
trillion. 

Americans' disposable, or after- 
tax, income increased 0.4 percent in 
July after creeping down 0.2 percent 
in June. 



Falwell shifts donations 



By Trie Associoted Press 

LYNCHBURG, Va. — The Rev. 
Jerry Falwell has acknowledged that 
more than $6.7 million in contribu- 
tions to his political organizations 
was spent on his religious ministries 
during the past three years but says 
the transfers were appropriate. 

"I think that most people are giv- 
ing because I signed the letter," he 
said. 'They could care less if the pro- 
ject was being administered by what- 
ever arms of the Jerry Falwell mini- 



stry enterprise.*' 

However, many of those who con- 
tributed to his political groups would 
not have given directly to his reli- 
gious organizations, Falwell told an 
overflow crowd of about 4,000 dur- 
ing his regular Sunday service at 
Thomas Road Baptist Church in 
Lynchburg. 

The local News & Daily Advance 
reported the fund transfers in its Sun- 
day editions, saying it obtained the 
information from federal and state 
agencies. Falwell said he also gave 



the newspaper information. 

"I think it is something that is 
overdue for all the ministries. I think 
generally, it was a very fair presenta- 
tion of what we gave them," he said. 

Internal Revenue Service regula- 
tions do not prohibit such transfers 
unless the recipient of the funds has 
misled the donor. 

The newspaper reported that 
slightly more than $6.7 million was 
taken from Falwell 's political orga- 
nizations, the Moral Majority and 
Liberty Federation. 




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avaitaBte at Lafene "Health Center 

Student Spouses can be eligible for care to 
include all the available services at Lafene 
Student Health Center simply by paying the 
Spouse Health Fee each semester. This fee is for 
the same amount as the Student health fee and 
must be paid within 10 days of the time the 
students own health fees are paid. 

For more information 

contact Lafene Health Center at 

532-6544 




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injury. 

Anderson was murdered in a field 
south of Manhattan in November 
1983. His wife, who has since remar- 
ried, was charged last May with first- 
degree murder in his death. A trial is 
pending, 

Eldridgc is serving a 514 - 10 
18 -year prison sentence after plead- 
ing guilty in August 1985 to two 
counts of criminal solicitation to 
murder her husband. However, pro- 
secutors have said neither of the plots 
resulted in Anderson's death. 

Bird was convicted of first-degree 
murder in the 1983 death of his wife, 
Sandra, and of criminal solitication 
to commit first-degree murder in an 
unsuccessful plot against Anderson. 
He is serving a life prison term. 

Testimony in his trials pointed to a 



love affair between Bird and Ander- 
son when she worked for him when 
he was a Lutheran pastor In Emporia. 

Eldridgc waived her claim to the 
benefits of the insurance policy last 
November, but asked that the money 
be paid to the couple's four children 
— four girls ranging in age from 6 to 
13. 

The girls were in court briefly 
Monday with their grandfather. They 
were introduced to the prospective 
jurors, then allowed to leave. The 
attorney for the children said they 
would not return for the rest of the 
trial. 

Saffcls ruled last Friday he would 
not bar Edward A. Hund of Wichita, 
the attorney for the Anderson child- 
ren, from introducing evidence 
which might link Eldridgc to the 



murder of her husband. 

Hund cautioned jurors during 
Monday's selection process to con- 
centrate on the civil case before them 
and not to become "bound up in the 
drama" of the publicized Emporia 
case. 

During questioning by Saffcls, all 
of the jurors said they were aware of 
the Anderson-Bird case through 
news media accounts, but promised 
they could render a fair verdict in the 
civil case. 

Torrance Crebs of St. Louis, lead 
attorney for the insurance company, 
was assured by jurors that they had 
no prejudices against insurance com- 
panies and that the prospect of seeing 
insurance policy benefits paid to four 
children would not influence their 
judgement 



Former House Speaker 
writes from experience 



By The Associoted Press 

WASHINGTON — Former 
House Speaker Thomas P. O'Neill, 
in his candid new autobiography, 
calls Robert Kennedy a "self- 
important upstart," Mikhail Gorba- 
chev a "very appealing" but 
dangerous man and Ronald Rea- 
gan a bad president who would 
have made a great king. 

"Man of the House: The Life and 
Political Memoirs of Speaker Tip 
O'Neill," is a string of blunt assess- 
ments and anecdotes that spans 
nearly 60 years in politics. 

O'Neill talks about his first dip 
into politics, campaigning for 
Alfred E. Smith's presidential 
election in 1928 as a high school 
freshman in Cambridge, Mass., 
through his 34 years in the House, 
the last 10 as speaker. He retired 
this year at age 74. 

The Massachusetts Democrat 
praises his longtime adversary. 
President Reagan, for his wit, sense 
of humor and extraordinary com- 
munication skills. "He's the best 
public speaker I've ever seen. With 



age, I'm beginning to think that in 
this respect he dwarfs both 
Roosevelt and Kennedy," O'Neill 
writes. 

But the former speaker attacks 
Reagan not only on his policies but 
on his handling of the job. 

"Ronald Reagan lacked the 
knowledge he should have had in 
every sphere, both domestic and 
international," O'Neill wrote. 
"Most of the lime he was an actor 
reading lines, who didn't under- 
stand his own programs. I hate to 
say it about such an agreeable man, 
but it was sinful that Ronald Rea- 
gan ever became president." 

"But let me give him his due: he 
would have made a great king." 

He calls former President Carter 
"the smartest public official I've 
ever known" on the issues but who 
who failed because he refused to 
learn the ways of Washington. 

O'Neill places much of the 
blame on Carter's staff, who he 
said treated Congress like the 
Georgia Legislature. 

"As far as (chief of staff Hamil- 
ton) Jordan was concerned, a 



House speaker was something you 
bought on sale at Radio Shack," he 
writes, chastising Jordan for giving 
the O'Neill family back row scats 
at a 1981 inaugural gala. 

Discussing Soviet leader Gorba- 
chev, O'Neill says: "He's a very 
appealing guy, which is what 
makes htm so dangerous. The Rus- 
sian leadership may have affected a 
new and more sophisticated style, 
but the Soviet bear remains as 
aggressive and unpredictable as 
ever." 

O'Neill praises the late John F. 
Kennedy, whom he replaced in the 
House in 1952 when JFK won a 
Senate scat, but reveals a deep rift 
with the late Sen. Robert F. 
Kennedy. 

"We weren't friendly, and to be 
blunt about it, 1 never really liked 
him," O'Neill writes. "To me he 
was a self-important upstart and a 
know-it-all. To him, I was simply a 
street -comer pol." 

O'Neill says that in the 1950s, 
Robert Kennedy told a senator he 
was considering challenging 
O'Neill for his House scat. 



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Casualty's name 
remains enigma 
after 15 months 



By Th« Associated Press 

NEVADA, Mo, — The mystery 
remains IS months after a man was 
struck and lulled by a car as he stood 
on U.S. 54 near the Missouri-Kansas 
state line. 

The marker on his grave in New- 
ton Burial Park shows only the day 
he died — May 11, 1986. 

"We tried everything we could, 
but we hit a blank wall each lime," 
Highway Patrol Trooper EJ. New- 
man, the accident investigator, said 
of efforts to identify the victim who 
is listed only as John Doe. 

"This is the first lime I've ever 
encountered anything like this and it 
really bothers me. I'd like to get it 
solved, identify him and close the 
case," Newman said. 

He said the man died shortly after 
midnight in the westbound lane of 
U.S. 54 about a half mile from the 
Kansas border. Newman said witnes- 
ses reported seeing ihe man standing 
in the road staring at the ground. The 
witnesses said they turned their car 
around to go back and help the man 
but he had been hit by ihe time they 
returned. 

The victim's wallet contained only 
an advertisement for a Joplin truck- 
ing firm and a slip of paper with a 
woman's name and an address. 
Efforts to trace the woman through 
the Tulsa, Ok la., address failed. 

Newman said the victim's finger- 
prints were sent to the FBI in 



Washington, but that also turned out 
to be a dead end. "He was never in 
trouble and never in the Army, or the 
FBI would have had his finger- 
prints," Newman said. "The prints 
arc usually your best hope if he's not 
a local guy." 

"We tried everything we 
could, but we hit a blank 
wall each time." 
—Trooper EJ. Newman 

A description of the victim — 
about 30 years of age, 5 feet 10, about 
160 pounds with brown hair and blue 
eyes, and several scars — and a 
photograph and composite picture 
were distributed nationwide. Author- 
ities hoped — and still do — that 
someone would report a missing per- 
son who matches description. 

"There have been quite a few that 
were close," Newman said. "It 
looked real good at one point. I was 
just sure we had it, but at the last 
minute it turned out not to be him." 

"I keep thinking that someday 
someone who was close to him will 
call." Newman said. "He's got to 
belong to someone. It's amazing 
someone hasn't reported him. 

"But when I started working the 
case, I was amazed at the number of 
people who go unidentified each 
year. There are people like that — 
loners who travel around the country 
with no identification." 



Prison conditions 
violate civil rights, 
newspaper reports 

By The Auocloied Press 



TOPEKA —Department of Cor- 
rections and U.S. Justice Department 
officials met far two hours Monday 
to discuss possible problems with 
conditions at the stale's maximum 
security prison. 

/The. private meeting centered 
souni the findings of a Justice 
department report released to slate 
officials in June, according to a state- 
ment Corrections Secretary Richard 
Mills released after it finished. 

Corrections officials have 
declined to make the report public, 
but ihe Kansas City Times has 
reported it alleges conditions at the 
Kansas State Penitentiary may vio- 
late prisoners' civil rights. 

Among the allegations is that 
health care at the 1 16-year-old insti- 
tution is inadequate, ihe Times has 
said. Larry Cowger, special assistant 
to Mills, would not comment on the 
report. 

Mills and several corrections offi- 
cials met with John Petersen, Gov. 
Mike Hayden's legal counsel; Ben 
Burgess, U.S. Attorney for Kansas; 
and two Justice Department attor- 
neys, said Cowger, who attended the 
meeting. 

"The meeting today was the fust 
step towards addressing the concerns 



raised by the Justice Department," 
Mills said in his statement "We had 
an opportunity respond to their con- 
cerns and to provide some updated 
information concerning conditions at 
the penitentiary." 

Mills said in his statement that 
"further discussion" will lake place, 
and Cowger said additional meetings 
with Justice Department offitjial^ 
may be scheduled. 

Kathy Peterson, Hayden's press 
secretary, said the federal officials 
wanted updated information because 
ihe report stemmed from a lour of the 
penitentiary in April 1986. 

"That was the only thing resolved 
because of the meeting," Mrs. Peter- 
son said. 

According to published reports, a 
consultant hired by the state after ihe 
report was completed said in a study 
that (he penitentiary's medical care 
was inadequate and its medical staff 
needed to be doubled. 

Mrs. Peterson said the slate could 
face a federal lawsuit, but added that 
Justice Department officials had not 
yet threatened to file one. 

The stale already is operating 
under a 1980 federal court decree in 
which it promised 10 make improve- 
ments at the prison. The agreement 
stemmed from several complaints 
filed by inmates in federal court. 



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Civil Rights pioneer dies 



Rally planner, 75, 
remained active 



By The Assoc io ted Press 

NEW YORK — Bayard Rustin. 
ihe civil rights pioneer and activist 
who organized the Washington ral- 
ly at which Dr. Martin Luther King 
gave his "I have a dream" speech, 
has died. He was 75. 

Rustin died Sunday at Lenox Hill 
Hospital, where he had undergone 
surgery Friday for a ruptured 
appendix, said Norman Hill, presi- 
dent of the A. Philip Randolph 
Institute 

Rustin, co-chairman of the insii- 
lute, went to the hospital with sto- 
mach pains on his return from a trip 
to Haiti. He had gone to Haiti with a 
labor group lo assess the prospects 
for democratic change there, said 
Hill. 

A pioneer, planner and thinker of 
Ihe civil rights, peace arid labor 



movements all his adult life, Rustin 
survived a major heart attack in 
1971 and continued to campaign 
actively around the world against 
violence and injustice. 

"He had boundless energy. He 
danced and sang at his 75th birth- 
day tribute," said Hill. 

In May he led a delegation of the 
Citizens Commission on Indochin- 
csc Refugees on a tour of refugee 
camps on the Thai -Cambodian 
border. 

That same week he was among 
ihe signers of an American Federa- 
tion of Teachers* manifesto on the 
need io teach democratic values to 
school children. 

Arrested more than two dozen 
limes during a life of activism, Rus- 
tin also came under fire from radi- 
cal blacks during the upheavals of 
the 1960s and 1970s for counseling 



against violence and black 
separatism. 

"I'm prepared to be a Tom if it's 
ihe only way I can save women and 
children from being shot down in . 
ihe sireci," he said when he was 
Liunicd for walking the streets of 
Harlem lo help cool the riots of 
1964. 

Rustin was jailed for 2'A years as 
a conscientious objector during 
World War II and was an early foe 
of America's war in Vietnam. 

New York's Mayor Edward I. 
Koch called him "absolutely 
fearless." 

"He taught us love and he gave 
us peace," said Sen. Daniel P. Moy- 
nihan, D-N.Y., who said the 1963 
Washington rally Rustin orche- 
strated "changed the nation." 

Rustin 's activism dated from his 
high school years in West Chester, 
Pa, IK was bom there March 17, 
1910, one of 12 children, and was 
raised by his grandparents. 

Ruslin recalled thai traveling as a 
member of a stale championship 
football team, he was refused ser- 



vice at a restaurant and thrown qui. 

"From that point on, I took the 
conviction that 1 would not accept 
segregation," he said. 

He attended Wilberforce Univer- 
sity in Ohio, Chcyney State Teach- 
ers College in Pcnnsyvania and 
City College of New York from 
1930 io 1935. and was later 
awarded several honorary degrees . 

Living in Harlem in [he late 
1930s, he supported himself by 
singing in nightclubs with enter- 
tainers like Josh White and Huddte 
"Leadbelly" Ledbetter. 

Rustin participated in ihe first 
Freedom Ride against segregation 
in 1947, and wound up doing 30 
days in a North Carolina chain 
gang. 

In 1955 he went to Montgomery, 
Ala., lo help King organize the bus 
boycott, a landmark vie lory for the 
civil rights movement. 

His organizational skills brought 
^00,000 people to the 1963 march 
on Washington and King's mes- 
merizing speech at the Lincoln 
Memorial. 



Coalition plans anti-nuclear waste rally 



By The Associated Press 

TOPEKA — A group opposed lo 
ihe state's membership in a regional 
compact for the disposal of radioac- 
tive waste has scheduled a rally on 
Ihe Capitol grounds for the first day 
of a special session of ihe 
Legislature. 

The Kansas Coalition on Nuclear 
Waste is having the rally Aug. 31 to 
urge lawmakers io debate Kansas' 
participation in the Central Interstate 
Low-Level Radioactive Waste Com- 
pact, said Laura Mcnhuscn of Jewell, 



ihe group's president. 

Gov. Mike Hayden has called the 
special session to have lawmakers 
consider a comprehensive highway 
program, and he has said he wanis 
legislative leaders to limit the debate 
to highways to avoid a protracted 
session. Hayden plans to appear at 
the rally, which begins at 9 a.m. on 
the north steps of the Capitol. 

"We're encouraging people to call 
ihcir legislators and ask that it be dis- 
cussed during the special session," 
Mcnhuscn said. 

In 1982, Kansas joined ihe com- 



pact, which also includes Arkansas, 
Louisiana, Nebraska and Oklahoma. 
Under federal law, a host state for a 
regional dump must be selected by 
the beginning of next year. The com- 
pact has already chosen a developer, 
U.S. Ecology, of Louisville, Ky., to 
build a site. 
The compact has sparked opposi- 



tion in Kansas, where officials and 
some residents have said they think 
the state has a good chance of becom- 
ing the host state for a dump. 

During the 1987 Legislature, 
attempts to pull the state out of the 
compact failed in the Senate, and a 
withdrawal measure did not get out 
of a House committee. 



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Richard Martin, new director of McCain Auditorium, began his posi- 
tion at K -State on July 27. One of Martin's main goals is to get stu- 



Staft/Jim L>ielz 

dents not only going to the programs, but also understanding them. 
Martin believes the arts play an important role on campus. 



Martin working way west 



By Jim Dietz 

Collegian Reporter 

Since working in the Union of 
Soviet Socialist Republics more than 
ten years ago, Richard Martin has 
slowly worked his way west. 

Martin began his duties as die new 
director of McCain Auditorium July 
27. 

A native of Memphis, Tenn., he 
received his bachelors degree in 
Slavic languages and literature from 
the University of Chicago, and his 
master's in Slavic linguistics in Rus- 
sian literature from Columbia Uni- 
versity. He spent the last 1 1 years as 
manager of the Artists Series at Pen- 
nsylvania State University. 

Prior to working in Pennsylvania, 
Martin selected the cultural events 
that American exchange students 
attended while in Leningrad. 



McCain's director 
began trek in USSR 



Martin has a strong belief that the 
arts play a very important role on a 
campus. 

"The students need to have an 
opportunity to sec what is going on in 
the arts, from this country and 
abroad," Martin said. 

One of Martin's main goals is to 
get students not only going to the 
programs, but also understanding 
them. 

"It's a chance one will never have 
again to experiment with things that 
you might come to like," Martin said. 
"The more one goes, the more one 
knows." 

He said he is not looking to make 



any immediate changes at McCain; 
rather, he will wait and observe the 
program. 

"What might look strange or 
unusual now might make eminently 
good sense six months from now 
given the situation," Martin said. 

It is more important to bring the 
knowledge, the skills and the experi- 
ence from outside to change the 
program if any arc needed, Martin 



said. 

As far as Martin's new environ- 
ment is concerned, he is quite 
pleased, he said, and he believes K- 
Slate is generally a good university 
and is even somewhat underrated. 

Martin said he considers McCain 
Auditorium a fine facility with a 
good program schedule already in 
place. 

He also said he is looking forward 
to working with the McCain Deve- 
lopment Board. 

"(They arc) a dedicated group of 
individuals who are willing to give of 
their time and resources to make the 
arts work," Martin said. 



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KAMtAt tTATl COLLIQMN, Tw— day. Augut 2B, 1M7 

Governor replaces 
Carlin's apointees 



By The Associated Press 

TOPEKA — Revenue Secretary 
Harley T. Duncan announced Mon- 
day appointment of Republicans 
John R. Luttjohann as director of tax- 
ation and Terry Dean Hamblin as 
director of property valuation. 

Luttjohann and Hamblin replace 
Democrats Carol Bonebrakc and Vic 
Miller, appointees who served under 
former Democratic Gov. John 
Carl in. 

Both Luttjohann and Hamblin are 
attorneys and certified public 
accountants. They will join the 
Revenue Department on Sept. 18 and 
will be paid identical annual salaries 
of $54,000. 

Miller, a former state representa- 
tive and now a member of the Topcka 
City Council, resigned as property 
valuation director last December 
before Republican Gov. Mike Hay- 
den took office. Duncan has been 
directing the property valuation divi- 
sion the past eight months in addition 
to his duties as head of the Revenue 
Department. 

Bonebrake said Duncan informed 
her when he was appointed revenue 
secretary by Hayden on June 5 that 
she would be replaced. Nothing else 
was said about her leaving, she said, 
until last Friday when Duncan 
informed her she was being replaced. 

Duncan, a Democrat, served under 
Carlin but was retained by Hayden 
on an acting basis from January until 



June, when the new Republican gov- 
ernor decided to keep Duncan as his 
permanent revenue secretary. 

"I did not resign," Bonebrake said 
in an Associated Press interview. "I 
didn't ask why I was being replaced. 
He (Duncan) just said I was being 
replaced. He did not ask for my resig- 
nation and therefore I did not give it." 

Bonebrake said that to the best of 
her knowledge her dismissal 
"doesn't go any deeper than that I am 
a registered Democrat." 

"Nobody particularly likes to lose 
his or her job, but that's the game's 
played this way," she said. "I went in 
with my eyes wide open. At best 
these are four- or eight-year jobs and 
I've been here eight" 

Bonebrake, former attorney for 
the property valuation division who 
has headed the tax division the past 
four years, said she plans to enter pri- 
vate law practice in Topcka. 

Luttjohann, a member of a private 
Topcka accounting firm since 1979, 
served as a corporate income lax 
auditor in the Revenue Department 
in 1978-79. He is a 1978 graduate of 
Washbum University and earned his 
law degree from Washbum in 1983. 

Hamblin, who lives in Derby, has 
been in private law practice there the 
past four years, but formerly was 
associated with a Topeka accounting 
firm. A member of the Derby School 
Board, Hamblin is a 1978 graduate of 
Emporia State University and earned 
his law degree from Washbum. 



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President to sell adoption as 'alternative' 



By The Associated Press 

SANTA BARBARA, Calif. - 
President Reagan, after moving to 
stop the use of federal money for 
abortion counseling services, named 
a federal task force Monday to sell 
adoption as an "alternative for pre- 
gnant women." 

"Americans are a warm-hearted, 
caring people, and for years, Ameri- 
can couples have reached out to 
embrace children who otherwise 
would grow up without a stable fami- 
ly life," Reagan, himself an adoptive 
parent, said in a statement released 
here. 

"We must expand and broaden our 



Reagan's goal is to decrease abortions 



efforts to make sure that America's 
family-less children are adopted," 
said the statement. "We must do all 
we can to remove obstacles that pre- 
vent qualified adoptive parents from 
accepting these children into their 
home." 

But in describing the work of the 
task force, White House spokesman 
Marlin Fiuwater, briefing reporters 
at a seaside resort hotel whi le Reagan 
continued his vacation on a moun- 
taintop ranch north of here, acknow- 
ledged that the pro-adoption initia- 
tive was also a part of Reagan's ami- 



Condemned killer 
says he's innocent 
up until execution 



By The Associated Press 

ANGOLA, La. — An accoun- 
tant convicted of killing his sec- 
retary to cover up an embezzle- 
ment gave the thumbs-up sign 
Monday as he died in Louisiana's 
electric chair. 

Sterling Rault, who once 
claimed two cousins came back 
from the grave to rape and kill 
Jane Ellen Francioni, maintained 
his innocence in a two-minute 
final statement that dealt mainly 
with his Christian beliefs. 



"I would like the public 
to know that they are 
killing an innocent man 
at this time. I am only 
transferring from death 
row to life row with eter- 
nal life. 

— Sterling Rault 



He was the eighth man exe- 
cuted in Louisiana this summer 
and the 87th in the United States 
since the U.S. Supreme Court 
allowed the reinstatement of the 
death penalty in 1976. 

Rault, 36, was condemned for 
raping, shooting and slitting the 
throat of Ms. Francioni, 21, of 
Slidell, in 1982 and then dousing 
her body with gasoline before set- 
ting it on fire. 

Prosecutors said Rault killed 
Ms. Francioni because she knew 
he had embezzled $84,000 from 



the Louisiana Energy and Deve- 
lopment Co. in New Orleans, 
where they worked, and feared 
she would tell someone. 

"I would like the public to 
know that they are killing an inno- 
cent man at this time," Rault said. 

"I am only transferring from 
death row to life row with eternal 
life, as Life Row Ministries' many 
members have taught me," Rault 
said. " Even as I sit in this chair, 1 
intend to stand tall for Christ" 

He blew a kiss and mouthed the 
words "I love you" to his aunt and 
spiritual adviser. Sister Mary 
Rault, a Roman Catholic nun. She 
responded in kind. 

Rault had given several 
accounts of the night of the 
murder. 

He originally told arresting 
officers that he and Ms. Francioni 
were kidnapped by two masked 
men who raped and killed her. 

At his state Pardon Board hear- 
ing, Rault said he recalled nothing 
of the events preceding his arrest 
and contended someone must 
have drugged him. 

Later, under hypnosis, Rault 
said Ms. Francioni was shot acci- 
dentally when his deceased cou- 
sins appeared to rape the woman 
and slit her throat. 

In yet another version, Rault 
told his defense attorney that Ms. 
Francioni pulled a gun on him and 
was accidentally shot during a 
struggle. He said when he realized 
she was dead, he cremated ha in 
accordance with previously 
expressed wishes, according to 
court documents. 



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abortion campaign. 

"It is true that adoption is an alter- 
native to abortion," the spokesman 
said. "We want to make sure that 
there aren't (federal) rules and reg- 
ulations that hinder that process." 

Fitzwater added, "1 think it's lair 
to say it's pan of the family values 
initiative" that Reagan alluded to ear- 
ly this month during an appearance 
before right-to-life activists gathered 
in the Old Executive Office Building 
next to the White House. 

On that occasion, Reagan pledged 
to work as hard as possible for pro- 



life causes. He also announced a 
series of regulations, proposed by the 
Department of Health and Human 
Services, which would have the 
effect of denying the use of federal 
tax dollars for abortion counseling 
and referral services by some 4,500 
family planning centers. 

Fiuwater said Monday that the 
process of adoption in this country 
"cries out for some kinds of solution 
in a number of areas." 

The task force, composed of offi- 
cials from a host of federal agencies 
and departments, will focus on "bar- 



riers to adoption," the spokesman 
said. 

"Up until now," Fitzwater added, 
"the federal government has not real- 
ly taken a good and comprehensive 
look at this problem. This is not 
designed to correct a problem within 
government. It is designed to correct 
a problem within society." 

Reagan's son Michael is adopted. 
The president has another son, Ron, 
and two daughters, Patti Davis and 
Maureen Reagan. 

Kate Michelman, executive direc- 
tor of the National Abortion Rights 



Action League, said the government 
should not be spending money, lime 
and energy promoting one reproduc- 
tive option over another. 

"Adoption is a viable and impor- 
tant option for women facing an 
unplanned pregnancy, but it is only 
one," she said. "Women should not 
be intimidated or pressured into 
adoption or abortion or foster care or 
any of the options. They have to be 
supported to come to the decision 
that is best for them and their 
family." 

Michelman said many women find 
adoption a difficult choice and said 
carrying a pregnancy to term can be 
life-threatening for teen-agers. 



Report shows national abortion decline 



By Th» Associated Press 

ATLANTA — In the wake of the 
nation's first reported decline in 
abortions, federal health researchers 
have set out to learn why. 

A new report from the national 
Centers fa- Disease Control says 
1,268,987 legal abortions were per- 
formed in the United States in 1983, 
the latest year for which figures were 
available. That was down 2.7 percent 
from the 1,303,980 reported in 1982. 

It was the first reported decrease 
since national abortion record- 
keeping began in 1969. 

The CDC, in its latest Surveillance 
Summaries report, drew no conclu- 
sions about the decrease. 

"We're now working on analysis," 
said CDC reproductive health spe- 
cialist Dr, Hani Atrash. "We can't 
conclude anything on the basis of j ust 
the numbers we had." 

One possible reason is that the 
demand for abortion may have simp- 
ly peaked, Atrash said. "A higher 
number of women have been steril- 
ized over the years, and they don't 



get pregnant anymore, so they have 
no need for abortions," he said. 

The CDC report noted that another 
abortion statistic began falling two 
years earlier; the nation's abortion 
rate peaked in 1980 at 25 abortions 
for every 1,000 females 15-44, slow- 
ing to 24 per 1,000 in both 1981 and 
1982 and slowing again to 23 per 
1,000 by 1983. 

"It could be that more women arc 
using contraceptives these days, so 
there arc less unwanted pregnan- 
cies," Atrash said. 

In the coming months, CDC 
researchers hope to further analyze 
their statistics about the women who 
had abortions in 1983, ■ 

The District of Columbia reported 
the nation's highest abortion rate in 
1982 and 1983 — greater than 100 
abortions per 1,000 women between 
ages 15 and 44. West Virginia 
reported the lowest rate — six abor- 
tions per 1,000 women 15-44. 

Although data were received from 
health officials in all 50 states and the 
District of Columbia, the CDC noted 
that the number of legal abortions 



Gulf 



■ CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 
force knew there was a ship in the 
area but didn't know it was Iranian 
"until they saw the flag." 

He said the Iranian vessel ignored 
warnings to move away until a heli- 
copter gunship from the Guadalcanal 
was scrambled and a frigate moved 
out to chase the Iranian vessel. 

In a separate incident, the Penta- 
gon said two small sailing dhows of 
unknown nationality came within 
eight miles of the destroyer Kidd, 
which was escorting the Bridgcton 
convoy. 

The Pentagon said the Kidd fired a 



machine gun across the boats' bows 
after they failed to heed flares and 
verbal warnings to stay clear, and the 
boats turned away from the convoy. 

Arab dhows and boats or helicop- 
ters chartered by foreign reporters 
several times have approached con- 
voys and been warned away. 

At the United Nations, Soviet 
Deputy Foreign Minister Vladimir F. 
Pctrovsky said there had been an 
"unprecedented buildup" in the gulf 
of warships from the United Slates 
and other NATO countries, 

Mohammad Jawad Larijani, Iran's 
deputy foreign minister for interna- 
tional affairs, was meeting with U.N. 
Secretary General Javier Perez dc 
Cuellar in New York on Monday. 



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reported to federal officials is prob- 
ably lower than the number actually 
performed. In 1982, The Alan Cut- 
tmacher Institute, which docs its own 
studies on abortion trends, reported 
17 percent more abortions man did 
the CDC. 

The CDC reported that along with 
the number of U.S. abortions, the 
percentage obtained by lecn-agers is 
also on the decline. Teen-agers had 



27 percent of reported U.S. abortions 
in 1983, down from 29 percent in 
1980. 

White women were, statistically, 
less likely than minority women to 
have abortions. In 1983, the CDC 
reported, there were 497 abortions 
for every 1,000 live births by blacks 
or females of other races, compared 
to 302 abortions per 1 ,000 live births 
by white females. 



CAREER PLANNING & PLACEMENT 

ORIENTATION SESSIONS FOR 

DEGREE CANDIDATES 

START AUGUST 27, 1987 

Details at Holtz Hall 

See Collegian Campus Bulletin entries each day and 

posting for other seminars throughout the 

semester. 




TLAfi F66TBALL 

OFFICIALS 

Rec Services 

is now hiring!! 

Attend these meetings: 

Thursday, Aug. 27 at 6:30 p.m. 
K-State Union, Room 213 
Sunday, Aug. 30 at 5 p.m. 
Intramural Fields/ Rec Complex 
Monday, Aug. 31 at 6:30 p.m. 
K-State Union, Room 213 

We need you!! 



K-State 



Players 



First Semester 

GENERAL AUDITIONS 

August 24, 25, 26 
7 p.m.— Nichols Hall Lobby 

for 

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Sept. 24, 25, 26, 30, Oct. 1, 2, 3 

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Oct. 22, 23, 24 

(Children 7 & up needed 5:30-6:30 on Aug. 24 & 25) 

THE REAL THING 

Nov. 12, 13, 14, 18, 19, 20, 21 

Any and all registered KSU students invited! 

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■ i " '■ 



Sports 

Kansas State Collegian ■ Tuesday, August 25, 1987 ■ Page 1 \ 



Former K-Stater 
now foreign pro 



By Chris Wilhelm 

Sports Writer 



Rcnec Whitney, one of K-State's 
outstanding volleyball players dur- 
ing the last several seasons and one 
of the Big Eight Conference's most 
touted female athletes, is now play- 
ing professional volleyball in 
Switzerland. 

Whitney, who was attending the 
University until her jump into the 
professional leagues in October 
1986, is currently playing for the 
Heifti Sports Leysin volleyball team. 

The club league Whitney's team 
belongs to is the B-league, with the 
ordcrof teams being decided on team 
records at the end of the previous sea- 
son. Each of the Swiss teams is 
allowed two foreign players. Whit- 
ney and her coach, a native of Hol- 
land (who also plays), are the two 
foreigners on the Heifti Sports Ley- 
sin team. 

Although she was home in Man- 
hattan over the summer, Whitney has 
returned to Switzerland to prepare 
for the upcoming season which 
begins in mid-October. Whitney 
kept herself busy over the summer 
conducting summer volleyball 
camps for high school students. She 
said she really enjoys working with 
kids and she loves volleyball so it is 
"just natural" for her to continue 
doing it. 

In her first year as a professional, 
Whitney was extremely successful as 
a seller and a hitter. "I was very 
pleased with my performance, as was 
the rest of my team. I was able to 
contribute right away and I was satis- 
fied with my play," Whimey said. 

Whitney's biggest problem in 
playing in the foreign league came 
with her inability to speak French. 
"It is frustrating sometimes not being 
able to express myself ihe way I want 
> to. It really makes me miss the con- 
venience of being at home (in the 
United States)." 



The first thing that lured Whimey 
away from K-Siate in the middle of 
the semester was the chance to travel. 
She said by playing volleyball, she 
could afford to live in Europe and 
experience different things. She said 
a friend had informed her of an open- 
ing on one of ihe teams. Whitney got 
in touch with the coach and ihe team 
signed her immediately. 

"It is frustrating sometimes 
not being able to express 
myself the way I want to. It 
really makes me miss the 
convenience of being at 
home (in the U.S.)...l'll 
play in Switzerland this 
year and possibly next 
year, but after that things 
are kind of up in the air." 
— Renee Whitney 

The learn provides Whitney with a 
place to stay, a car, a free education at 
the American University in Switzer- 
land (which would cost about 
$20,000 a year) and "a little bii of 
spending money." 

Although other teams are allowed 
to fill vacancies in their foreigner 
positions with Americans, Whitney 
is the only American presently play- 
ing in the Swiss league. 

Whitney has been provided with 
an apartment in the mountains. She 
described her new home by saying, 
"It's beautiful and the weather is 
always great" 

When questioned about the possi- 
bility of staying overseas for any 
length of time, Whitney said, "I'll 
play in Switzerland this year and pos- 
sibly next year, but after that things 
are kind of up in the air." 

Although Whimey is finishing up 
a degree irwJducation, she has consid- 
ered a move to coaching after she has 
finished school. 




After being re d-shirted his first year and sitting out most of last year with 
an injury, K -State running back Maurice Henry, who was described by 



Suit/Brad t-uutiicr 

Head Coach Stan Parrish as one of Ihe more talented running backs in 
the conference, hopes to become one of the best in the Big Eight. 



Tailback anxious to 'bust loose' 



By BILL LANG 
Sports Writer 



Upon arrival to the K-Statc gridi- 
ron in the fall of 1985, from Salina 
Central High School in Salina, Maur- 
ice Henry has been anxious to "bust 
loose." 

That "bust loose" attitude has 
fueled his desire to become one of the 
elite running backs in the Big Eight. 

"I've been wailing for a long lime 
for this and I finally feel that this year 
will be my best," Henry said. "I was 
redshirtcd my freshman year and was 



injured (with a broken bone in the 
righi foot) most of last year." 

The wait continues. During last 
week's drills, Henry suffered a slight 
pull of the hamstring and sat out a 
few days. 

"It's kind of frustrating," Henry 
said. "But I feel I'll be back and then 
I'll be ready lo bust loose." 

Head coach Stan Parrish described 
Henry as one of the more talented 
running backs in the conference. 

"If he's healthy, he can be one of 
the better backs in the Big Eight," 
Parrish added. "He's strong, fast and 



just a phenomenal athlete. He could 
be a big plus for us." 

During his freshman year, he gar- 
nered the title of "Best Overall Con- 
ditioned Athlete", the first freshman 
lo do so since 1980. 

This spring he was the strongest 
running back on the bench press, 
pressing 438 pounds. This is 
impressive for a man who weighs in 
at 230 pounds and stands 6-1. 

Henry expressed ihe same oudook 
for himself as Parrish did. 

"I feel thai if I am hcalihy, I can be 
one of the better backs in the Big 



Eight," Henry said. "We have a good 
line this year and they'll be creating a 
lot of holes for us. With ihe passing 
game getting bciicr it'll push the 
defense back and allow us to run for 
more." 

For Henry, ihe team's goals come 
first, although he would like to add 
his name to the list of yard-gainers 
before he leaves Wildcat-land. 

"We need to keep everybody 
healthy first," Henry said. "If we can 
get the blocking we need, the yardage 
will pile up and then the wins will 
soon follow." 



Richmond stars abroad 



By Chris Wilhelm 

Sports Writer 



K-Siatc basketball standout for- 
ward Milch Richmond learned a lot 
over the summer in Yugoslavia, 
but he's glad to be home. 

Richmond was a member of the 
United Slates basketball team at 
the World University Games in 
Zagreb, Yugoslavia. 

Entering his senior year at K- 
State, Richmond was the Uniicd 
Slate's leading scorer, averaging 
more than 15 points per contest 
The Americans won easily in the 
early games but were beaten in the 
championship game by the Yugo- 
slavian team. 100-85. 

Richmond saw the trip as a 
learning experience. He had never 
been overseas before and he found 
life in Yugoslavia much different 
than that of life in the U.S. The big- 
gest difference that Richmond 
noted was in the food. 

"I had a good time over there, 
but I never adjusted to the food," 
Richmond said. "You would ask a 
waiter if they had something, he 
would say yes and then he would 
bring you something else." 

Another difference Richmond 
noted was the lack of television 
programming aimed at the adult 
population. He said there were 
only two stations in Zagreb and he 
wasn't fond of either one of them. 

"One of the stations was for 
ihrcc-ycar-olds and the other sta- 
tion wasn't worth watching 
either." 

Richmond and the rest of the 
American team spent much of their 
free time either sightseeing or 
watching the other sporting events. 
The Americans were able to travel 
around the countryside on trains 
taking in the scenery. When he 
wasn't being a tourist, Richmond 
was able lo watch such sports as 
rowing, volleyball and water polo. 

When talking about the basket- 
ball ream's overall performance, 
Richmond sounded pleased. 

"The Uniicd States team played 
well. 1 really enjoyed playing with 
B.J, Armstrong (Iowa, guard) and 
Sean Elliot (Arizona, forward). 
They are really good players," 




Games prepare U.S. athletes 



By The Associated Prett 

INDIANAPOLIS - - The United 
Slates cnlcrs the final year of Olymp- 
ic preparation in excellent shape on 
Ihe track and in ihe pool. Chances are 
also bright in gymnastics, volleyball 
and about a dozen less-publicized 
sports. 

But in three of the most popular 
sports — basketball, baseball and 
boxing — a quick fix is needed. 

The United States won 369 med- 
als, including 168 gold, in the Pan 
American Games, which concluded 
Sunday. But only one gold came in 
the boxing ring, by Kelcie Banks, 
while Cuba won a record 10 titles. 

And no gold was won in men's 
basketball and baseball. 

"I don't think we need to panic," 
said Roosevelt Sanders, coach of the 
U.S. boxing team, which was 2-9 in 
matches against Cuba. 

Banks said he felt fighting the 
Cubans would provide international 
seasoning and be beneficial "down 
the road, especially at the Olympics." 

Losing to Brazil in one of the most 
stunning basketball losses the 
American men ever have suffered 
also could be helpful for the trip to 
Seoul. Georgetown Coach John 
Thompson, the Olympic team coach 
who attended some of the Pan Am 
team's games, doesn't figure to have 



a squad that will allow 1 20 points to 
opponents. 

But what Thompson must have in 
Seoul is anoihcr big, strong center to 
back up David Robinson. He also 
needs some 3-poinl shooters to take 
advantage of the long bomb the way 
Brazil's Oscar Schmidt did in the 
final. 

The U.S. baseball squad, a collec- 
tion of collegiate stars, gave the 
world champion Cubans their first 
loss in 20 years of Pan Am play . They 
also gave the Cubans a scare in the 
gold- medal game before falling 
13-9. 

Because (he Olympics will be held 
in September, none of the collegians 
drafted by major league teams nexi 
June can play for those organizations 
until after the 1988 season. 

The best pitcher in the tournament, 
reliever Cris Carpenter, is a No. 1 
draft pick of the St Louis Cardinals. 
He is faced with the choice of turning 
pro, returning to the University of 
Georgia as a punier or delaying his 
professional career to play in the 
Olympics. 

The U ,S. volleyball squad has won 
the 1984 Olympics, the World Cup, 
world championship and Pan Am 
Games, an unprecedented sweep. 
The team will be the favorite over the 
Soviets, Cubans and China. 

The women's basketball team won 



here dcspiic the absence of ihree of 
its stars, all oul with knee injuries. 
Wilh Cheryl Miller, Cindy Brown 
and KamicEthridgc in ihe lineup, ihe 
Americans will be formidable in 
Seoul. 

So will ihe gymnastics learns, 
although they don't figure to win 
many gold medals. The Soviets, 
Chinese, Japanese, East Germans 
and Romanians are the powers of the 
sport. 

As usual, the U.S. learn was over- 
powering in the pool and on the 
diving boards. Despite sending a 
young team composed of third- and 
fourth-place finishers from the 
national championships, the United 
States won 27 of 32 gold medals. 

The depth of American swim- 
ming, particularly among the 
women, is impressive. The East Ger- 
man women will gel a severe chal- 
lenge from the Americans in Seoul. 
The U.S. men should be nearly as 
successful as they were in Los 
Angeles, despite better competition. 

Greg Louganis will culminate his 
extraordinary diving career at Seoul, 
where he will be heavily favored to 
win off both the springboard and 
platform. Kelly McComick and 
Michelc Mitchell have beaten the 
Chinese and Soviet divers in the past 



Molitor hopes to extend tear 



1987 file photo 

K-State forward Mitch Richmond was a member oi' the United States 
basketball team at the World University Games in Yugoslavia. 



Richmond said. 

The Wildcats will be facing 
Troy Lewis of Purdue and Matt 
Bullard of Colorado, two of the 
members of the U.S. learn who 
Richmond thought were outstand- 
ing players. 

Richmond said drug testing was 
performed on all of the athletes and 
none of the American group tested 
positive. 

The head coach of the American 



learn, Mike Krzyzcwski of Duke 
University, really didn't need to 
make any major changes with 
Richmond, as the K-Stalc defense 
and the American team's defense 
were virtually the same. 

"The style of ball that we were 
playing over there (in Yugoslavia) 
wasn't really any different than 
what we play at K-Sute and ihe 
defense was the same so there real- 
ly weren't that many changes," 
Richmond said. 



By The Assoc toted Press 

MILWAUKEE -- Each day, as 
his hitting streak grows longer, Paul 
Molitor of the Milwaukee Brewers 
faces a new pitcher with one idea in 
mind — slopping him. 

Some pitchers have been tougher 
than others. Mike Boddickcr of Bal- 
timore, for example, held Molitor 
hilless in three trips on Aug. 13 
before he was lifted for reliever Tom 
Nicdcnfucr. 

Molilor hit a two-out homer in the 
ninth off Nicdcnfucr to keep the 
streak going. 

After getting Monday off, Molitor 
will iry to extend that streak to 39 
games Tuesday night when the 
Cleveland Indians and the American 
League's most regularly rocked, 
pitching staff come lo County 
Stadium. 



"You just focus on who you're 
going lo face rather than who you'd 
rather not face," Molitor said. 

Ken Schrom, 5-10, will start Tues- 
day for the Indians, and he's one 
pitcher, according to the numbers, 
who hasn't given Molilor much trou- 
ble. Molilor was 2-for-3 with two 
doubles and three RBI against 
Schrom in a scries last week, and he 
is 3-for-6 with five RBI this season 
against ihe right-hander. 

"I've had some success against 
Kenny, but he's had his days where 
he's given me trouble as well. It will 
just be a matter of getting ahead in 
ihe counl and getting some good 
pitches to hit" 

The Indians' other scheduled star- 
ters arc Rich Yctt 2-5, and Scott 
Bailes, 6-6. Molitor hasn't faced Yctt 
this season and is l-for-4 against 
Bailes. In last week's scries against 



the Indians, Molilor was 10- for- 20. 
But, in the opener of the series 
against Bailes, his only hit off Ihe 
left-hander was a third-inning bunt 
single. 

Molitor currently is hitting .371 
but, because he missed 44 games in 
the first half of the season with a vari- 
ety of injuries, he docs not have 
enough plate appearances to be listed 
among the league's leading hitters. 
Wade Boggs of the Boston Red Sox 
leads the American League with a 
.361 average. 

Molilor would need 502 plaic 
appearances to qualify for the baiting 
title. He currently has 315 at-batsand 
364 plate appearances with 38 games 
remaining. 

"There is a possibility if I play reg- 
ularly the remainder of the season I 
could qualify." Molitor said. 






mmm 



12 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, T y d«y, Augurt 28, 1M7 



Reagan's speech broadcast to rebels 



President pledges 
continued support 



By The Associated Press 

SAN JOSE, Costa Rica — Presi- 
dent Reagan told Nicaraguan rebels 
in a broadcast on a clandestine radio 
station Monday night that the United 
States will continue to support them 
"until the people of Nicaragua are 
guaranteed basic liberties." 

'The journey's end is 'Nicaragua 



Libre' {Free Nicaragua)," the presi- 
dent said in an unprecedented broad- 
cast over the rebels' "Radio 
Liberation" 

Reagan's three-minute taped 
speech in English, which was fol- 
lowed by a Spanish translation, 
began at about 6:30 p.m. and was 
jammed by the leftist Sandinista gov- 
ernment in Nicaragua but heard 



faintly in neighboring Costa Rica. 
Residents in parts of Managua, the 
Nicaraguan capital, said they could 
hear a few words of the Spanish 
translation under the jamming but 
could not understand them. 

The president a former broadcas- 
ter who comm un icatcs regu larl y with 
the American people via radio, taped 
the message Saturday at his ranch 20 
miles north of Santa Barbara, Calif., 
said presidential spokesman Marl in 
Fitzwatcr. 

Radio Liberation had announced 
on its 6 p.m. news program the 
speech would be carried three times 



"Hopes wilt be measured 
against reality in Nicar- 
agua and promises will 
be measured against 
peace.". 

—President Reagan 

Monday night and twice early 
Tuesday. 

Reagan said a peace plan signed 
by five Central American presidents 
in Guatemala on Aug. 7 "calls for 
sweeping political and social change 



to lake place in Nicaragua." 

But he called into question Nicar- 
agua's commitment to that 
agreement 

"Hopes will be measured against 
reality in Nicaragua and promises 
will be measured against peace," 
Reagan said. 

"The signing of the Guatemala 
peace plan was an important act of 
faith. But our faith must be tempered 
by realism, because faith without 
realism will not end in peace but in 
disillusionment," he said. 

The president noted that in signing 
the peace plan, Nicaraguan President 



Daniel Ortega promised to respect 
human rights and political and reli- 
gious freedom in his country. 

"But like you," Reagan told his lis 
toners, "I also know that the civil war 
in Nicaragua began when the Sandi- 
nistas promised you democracy hut 
failed to meet that commitment." 

Radio Liberation, which broad- 
casts news and music from 6 p.m. to 
6 a.m. daily, is frequently jammed in 
Nicaragua. Its point of origin is 
unknown and in the best of circum- 
stances its transmissions arc often 
scratchy and difficult to hear. 



Groups defend college costs 



*<«•*« 



Private universities 
disagree with study 



By The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON - An unpub- 
lished U.S. Department of Education 
study that concludes the total cost of 
a bachelor's degree is 54 percent 
higher at private colleges than public 
campuses is triggering a battle 
between higher education groups and 
the Reagan administration. 

Private college leaders long have 
argued that despite their sharply 
higher tuitions, overall costs at pri- 
vate institutions were on a par with 
the real costs of public higher educa- 
tion, including all state appropria- 
tions and subsidies. 

But a paper prepared by Duc-I.e 
To, a. research associate in the 
Department of Education's Office of 



Educational Research and Improve- 
ment, estimates that the full institu- 
tional cost of a bachelor's degree at 
all U.S. campuses in 1983 was 
$24,713, with the four-year cost 
averaging $18,474 at public colleges 
and $28,386 at private ones. 

To suggested that the reason publ- 
ic colleges cost less is because they 
enroll more students, including part- 
timers, and put them in larger classes. 
He said the most efficient size of a 
university "may be somewhere bey- 
ond 20,000 students" — a scale that 
few private campuses match, or want 
to match. 

"I think people should recognize I 
didn't consider quality of the degree 
in my paper. Highcostdoesn'mcces- 
sanly mean inefficiency," To said in 



an interview. 

The study's critics say it is riddled 
with errors and simply the latest ploy 
by Secretary of Education William J. 
Bennett to stir up public resentment 
of rising college costs. 

"It's really a dog," said Elaine El- 
Khawas, the American Council on 
Education's vice president for policy 
analysis and research. "It's full of 
mistakes and debatable 
assumptions." 

Allan W. Ostar, president of the 
American Association of State Col- 
leges and Universities, said the study 
"is poorly done and a disservice to 
everyone who is interested in under- 
standing higher education. ... I 
deplore this attempt to drive a wedge 
between public and independent 
institutions." 

Chester E. Finn Jr., the assistant 
secretary of education for research, 
defended the paper, which he said 
was still being edited. Finn said he 
was postponing a press seminar on 



the study that had been tentatively 
scheduled for next Friday. 

Finn said the paper, "Estimating 
the Cost of a Bachelor's Degree: An 
Institutional Cost Analysis," con- 
tained "an interesting and important 
discovery (that) does go contrary to 
the conventional wisdom. We can't 
tell you why that gap is there, but as 
far as we can make out it is." 

To, a native of Taiwan who holds a 
doctorate in economics from the Uni- 
versity of Pittsburgh, derived his fig- 
ures from the Higher Education Gen- 
eral Information Surveys (HEGIS) 
that the Department of Education 
conducts each year. He estimated the 
cost per credit hour of educating 
undergraduates, then multiplied that 
by the 120 hours needed for a bache- 
lor's degree. 

But To's critics said the HEGIS 
figures often omit how much states 
spent on construction, faculty pen- 
sions, security and other costs at 
public campuses. 



I 

at 

I 

* 

ft 

at 

I 

ft 

i 

I 

t 

I 

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1 

i 




PERSONALIZE 

your sentiments 

with a 

Collegian Classified 



Celeste drops out of presidential race 



By The Associated Press 

COLUMBUS, Ohio Gov. 

Richard Celeste on Monday said he 
has decided against running for the 
Democratic nomination for the 1988 
presidential race. 

Celeste, with his family nearby, 
made the announcement at an after- 
noon news conference at the Gover- 



nor's Mansion in suburban Colum- 
bus. He said he concluded a presiden- 
tial bid at this stage would cost loo 
much money and take too much time 
from running the slate. 

Celeste had announced in the 
spring that he was considering run- 
ning for the nomination. 

Since then, he said, he had talked 



with advisers and other supporters 
and decided he could spread the 
state's message better if he remained 
governor. 

Celeste estimated that a presiden- 
tial campagn would cost 56 million 
and an investment in time that 
"would be so substantial that Ohio's 
message would be overshadowed." 



Celeste, 49, is among a handful of 
Ohioans who have expressed interest 
in the 1988 race. Sen. John Glenn, D- 
Ohio, says he is considering a pres- 
idential race, but only if he can retire 
a debt from his unsuccessful 1984 
race. Rep. James Traficant, D-Ohio, 
said last week that he had authorized 
formation of a committee to explore 
a presidential bid. 



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Looking for an apartment? 
Check Collegian Classifieds 



Kidnappers release tape 



By The Assoctoted Press 

BEIRUT, Lebanon — Kidnappers 
holding two West Germans released 
a four-minute videotape early Tues- 
day showing hostage Alfred Schmidt 
pleading with Bonn to free a sus- 
pected Lebanese hijacker in return 
for their freedom. 

"We ask the government of Ger- 
many to seriously consider the 
release of Mohammed Ali Hamadiso 



our release may be possible," 
Schmidt, a 47-year-old engineer, 
said in the tape, which was delivered 
lo a Western news agency in Beirut. 

Schmidt appeared to be reading in 
German from a three-page, hand- 
written statement in a relaxed voice. 

He was kidnapped in Moslem west 
Beirut Jan. 20, three days after West 
German businessman Rudolf Cor- 
des, 53, was abducted on the city's 
airport highway. 



Schmidt and Cordcs were seized 
shortly after Hamadi, 22, was 
arrested in Frankfort for posession ol 
explosives. The United States had 
pressed for his extradition lo face 
charges of air piracy and murder in 
connection with the 1985 hijacking 
of a TWA jediner lo Beirut. 

The Bonn government on June 24 
rejected the U.S. request lo extradite 
Hamadi, and announced it would try 
the Lebanese in West Germany. 



r 



Collegian Classified Advertising 



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Write your ad in the form provided below, and mail il in, along with the oorrect payment, to STUDENT PUBLICATIONS, INC , 
KEDZIE HALL, ROOM 103. KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY, MANHATTAN. KANSAS 66506 You can also stop by Kedzie 
103 to place your ad or call 532-6555. Student Publications now accepts MasterCard and Visa (Minimum charge ol $5 ) 
The DEADLINE tor Classified Ads is NOON the day before publication; NOON Friday tor Monday's publication Deadline tor 
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* No last names or phone numbers will be printed in the Personals section. 

* Student Publications will not be responsible for more than one wrong classified insertion. It is the advertiser's responsibility to 
contact the paper if an error exists. No adjustment will be made if the error does not alter the value ol the ad. 

" Items found ON CAMPUS can be advertised FREE tor a period not exceeding three days They can be placed at Kedzie 103 
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* It mailed ads do not arnve by the Noon deadline, they will be placed m the next day's paper 

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Classified Ad Rates Classified Categories 



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01 


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IS 


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Sample the Best 

in the 

Arts and Entertainment 

with a 

KSU Student Ticket Package 

Save 15% off list prices! 



McCain Auditorium 

1987-88 KSU Season Ticket Package 



Roger Miller 
and Tom Chapin 
Friday. September 25, 8 p.m. 
Eleven-lime Grammy Award- 
winner Roger Miller and the 
versatile Tom Chapin join 
forces lor an evening thai 
promises a little bit ol coun- 
try, a little bit ol pop a tittle 
bit ol Broadway . and a whole 
lot Ol tun* Roger Miller will 
perform his lavonte songs - 
such bits as "Dang Me," 
"England Swings," Kansas 
City Star. " and, ol course, 
King ol ihe Road " Tom 
Chapm is a highly regarded 
singer, songwriter, guitarist, 
and actor, who can currently 
be seen as the host ol 
television s National Geo 
graphic Explorer 




I H \ \ k I v-ii n 





Stale Ballet of Missouri 

Monday. November 9,8 p.m. 
Under Ihe artistic direction ol 
internationally acclaimed 
choreographer Todd Bolender. 
the Stale Ballet ol Missouri 
has attracted national atten- 
tion tor the beauty . quality, 
and excitement ol lis perlor 
mances. Hailed the jewel ol 
the Midwest. ' the 2b 
member company will present 
a sinking tepertory of dra- 
matic, romantic, humorous, 
and conlemporaty works 

Camerata Musica 
ol Ihe DOR 

Zel|ka Slraka, conductor 
Saturday. January 3D, 8 p.m. 

Composed ol Ihe lines t 
musicians from East Gei 
many s leading orchestras 
the Camerata Musica ol Ihe 
DDR is making its debut tour 
ul the United States This 
award-winning chamber 
orchestra perlorms a reper- 
toire Hiat spans the German 
and Italian baroque as well as 
the classic ji and coniempo' 
ary periods Under me 
leadership ol Zei|ka Straka 
me Camerata Musica has 
Become synonymous with 
stylish precise performance 
and peautilui sound 



The Guthrie Theatre 

Frankenstein 

Monday. March 21, 8 p.m. 

The Gutnne Theatre returns to 
Ihe McCain slage with a new 
adaptation ot Mary Shelley's 
harrowing classic tale ol a - 
creature without parent, 
without peer Playwright 
Barbara Field, who wrote the 
scnpl tor the Guthrie s spec- 
tacular Great Expectations. 
focuses not on mad scientist 
or monster, but on the 
question ot responsibility 
between creator and a crea- 
tion Frankenstein tells the 
psychologically rich, very 
human story ol the unpredic- 
table troubles thai can Detail 
our best ideas 



andj 

Rodgers 

and Hammerstein 

The King and I 

Friday, April IS. 8 p.m. 
The captivating story ol a 
Strong-willed English gover- 
ness and and a despotic king 
who yearns to be progressive 
is brought to the stage in one 
of Broadway S mosl popular 
and charming musicals 
Winner ol 5 Tony Awards 
The King and I sparkles with 
memorable songs like Hello 
Young Lovers 1 ' , 'Getting to 
Know You. I Whistle a 
Happy Tune, and "Shall We 
Dance' . The King and I has 
everything needed lor a 
memorable evening ol 
theatre spectacular sets and 
costumes, a fascinating story 
and breathtaking music and 
lyrics 



KSU Student Season Package 

Orchestra seating: $56 95 Lower Balcony $48 45 



Name. 



Address „ 
Phone 



Student I D #. 



KSU Student Season Ticket Packages may be 
purchased at the McCain Auditorium Box Office 
Limit one Package per student 
Please present Student ID. when buying tickets 
Box office hours are 12-5 MF Phone 532-6428 

Financial assistance tor the McCain Periormance Series has 
oecn provided in part by the Kansas Arts Commission the 
Mid America Arts Alliance and tne National Endowment tor tne 
Arts 



I 



mmm 



KANSAS STATS COLLSOIAN, 



25, 1987 



13 



Brothers with AIDS return to school 



In spite of threats, 
police keep peace 



By The Associated Press 

ARCADIA. Fli, — Three brothers carry- 
ing the AIDS virus returned peacefully to 
their school under court order and police 
guard Monday despite threats and a boycott 
by frightened parents that kept up to half the 
pupils at home. 

Escorted by their parents and an attorney, 
Richard Ray, 10, Robert, 9, and Randy, 8, 
relumed to Memorial Elementary School for 
the first time in nearly a year. 

Only 337 youngsters showed up out of a 
projected first day enrollment of 632, or S3 



percent. District-wide attendance was only 
slightly higher, 63 percent, and school bus 
ridership was only one quarter of last year's 
first day. 

The boycott did not phase the boys' 
parents, who commented briefly to reporters 
as they wailed in line to pick up their children 
at the end of the school day. 

"My kids are going to school," their father, 
Clifford Ray, said firmly. Their mother. 
Louise Ray, admitted to some "anxious 
moments," but also said the children will 
continue at the school. 

DeSoto County school officials barred the 



trio last fall after they tested positive for anti- 
bodies to the AIDS virus. 

Doctors believe the brothers, all hemophil- 
iacs, were exposed to the virus through 
plasma-based medication (hey take so their 
blood will clot in case of injury. They do not 
have any symptoms of AIDS. 

The Ray family sued the school board in 
June, claiming discrimination. On Aug. 5, a 
federal judge in Tampa ordered 
reinstatement. 

Despite assurances from health experts 
that a casual school environment poses no 
risk, many parents in this rural community of 
10,000 fear their children will be exposed to 
acquired immune deficiency syndrome. 

Angry parents distributed petitions and 
sponsored rallies in a vain attempt to keep die 
boys out of regular classes, and called for a 
boycott if they did attend school. 

Larry Browning, superintendent of the 



DeSoto County School district, which has 
nearly 4.000 school children, said he thinks 
some parents might be waiting until the 
uproar dies down before sending their child- 
ren to school. 

Earlier, as classes began, the Ray boys 
were whisked past a crowd of reporters and 
camera crews into their fifth, fourth, and sec- 
ond grade classrooms in an attempt to gain 
"some normalcy" said Bill Earl, a Ray 
attorney. 

"They're under enormous pressure," he 
said. "They are excited to be back in school 
but a little bit nervous." 

Plainclothes police were stationed on 
school grounds Monday to ensure safety and 
keep outsiders away. The Rays had spent 
Sunday night in seclusion with their children 
because of telephoned death threats. 

In school. Earl said, pupils and staff were 
friendly and cooperative. 



Parents who defied the boycott acknow- 
ledged they were frightened and confused but 
determined that their children would get an 
education. 

Clarence Champeny, 33, left the decision 
to his 10-year-old son, Carl, who is in class 
with one of the Ray boys, and his daughter 
Christy, 12. 

"It worries mc, but it doesn't worry him. I 
have my doubts and fears and I'm very con- 
fused. I just have to go along with what my 
children want," he said. 

Cindy Ross took her three boys, ages 4, 6 
and 8, to school. 

"They're going to end up going anyhow, 
so they should not miss the first day," she 
said. "I told them about the boys that had 
AIDS, and I told them not to drink from die 
water fountain, to wash their hands and not to 
roughhousc or wrestle with anyone." 



Kedzie 103 



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On* day 8* »S par inch, Three con*eculiv* 
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Rubes® 



MARY KAY Cosmetics— Skin care— glamour prod 
ucta Free facial call F Ions Taylor, 5392070 Hand 

ic spued accessible 1 175) 

FLYING INTEREST you? For information on K State 
Flying Club call Hugh Imn. 5334311 or 538 3128 

urn 

WANTED - too overweight people lo iry new choco 
late, vanilla, and strawberry herbal weight control 
program No drug*, no eiercis* Doctor approved 
100% guaranteed MasterCard and Visa accepted 
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quotastbosies information Rush self addressed 
envelope CM/NA-COE POLS 7730. Rockfont, IL 
S11J6 (1 15) 

DOUGHNUTS CINNAMON roll*, and pastries. 
served late Friday and Saturday nights. Beginning 
July 10, 1 987, at Bakery On TheSquar*. 1217 Moro. 
behind Campus Cleaners (12) 

HOLLYWOOD S BEST Get your Cinemagic Video 
coupon hooks from Joy 778 5*94. belore9p m (i 
SI 

THE FONE Crlal* Canter will Da holding volunteer 
training Aug 29 and 30 m Union 2U All in feral ted 
persons ant encouraged to call 5324565 to regis 
left 1 -5) 

OPEN AIR food and cratl fair in Aggieviiie. October 
10 For information on booth* writ* Box ISO* <n 
Manhattan by September 25 42-19) 



By Leigh Rubin 



Enjoy Our Weekly 
Buffet Specials 

11 :30 a.m. -2 p.m. 
M— Texas Western BBQ 
T —Italian 
W-Oriental$y|95 

F — Cajun 



includes salad bar 
or call for carry -out 



y^TC 




UniwrsityT^Club 

17th & Anderson, 539-7531 



MUSIC PARTY Tuesday, August 25. 7 p m lo 9 p m 
Free gilts relreihments. lotsol new music Cross 
Reference Bookstore, 322 Poynti (2) 

ASK ME about Mary Kay Cosmetic*! Janet M ill i ken 
539 9*69 (2771 



APAHTMENTS FOB HENT-FUBMISMED Of 

TWO BEDROOM basement apartment lor rant Fully 
furnished S250 Renter pays water and electric 
537 322* 11-51 

TRANSFERRED. NEED to sublease large one- 
bedroom neit lo campus 820 Sunset, 1285 537 
1591 or 532-8281 I? 51 

THREE BEDROOM utilities mostly paid No pel*. 
* ale roads 539-6058. Monday Wednesday Friday 
mornings, or (9131 *M 2833 1 15) 

FREE RENT lasi month ol yearly Ma** Ten or twelve 
month lease Available In August. No pet* 537- 
8389 f?m 

NICE TWO bedroom duplet, gss air carpeted Irae 
lor August Telephone 537 733* (2-51 



AMHTMENTS FOB WENT- UNfUB MIS HEP 03 

FREE RENT last month of yearly lease Tenor twelve 
month lease Available in August No pets 537 
8389 i2tt) 



AUTOMOBILES FOB SALE M_ 

1978 PONTIAC Firebird. T-top, tour-speed, 1*000 
miles on rebuilt engine Call 519-4134 evenings it- 
51 

1991 DAT SUN 2B0ZX turbo, limited edition Ttop. 
leather, air. lull power, stereo. 530-9131 12-8) 

1978 DODGE Aspen waoon Air conditioned oowei 
s tearing! brakes Low mileage, runa welt 1500 or 
nest otter 5394202 or 53248*2. <24> 

1949 CHEVROLET one-ton truck, good lire* De 
pendabre include hoist antra part* 776-97*8 early 
or lata 124) 



CHILD CARE 



07 



CHILD CARE — Teacher has openings in Day Care 
home near Northviaw school Nutritious meals, 
activities 539-0585. licenser! |1-5I 



Bloom County 



By Berke Breathed 



m fftmu om*w». 
200 mites of putcme 

BCOOP UftSClS ... 12 MILLION 

emptex amic/iL K&cnoM 
to cowtcTW mmn 

evezY XC3NP... 




ems if i can 
Keep it Mt mom 

eVKSTlMr &&AKIW 

$nrrnm> $iwjin& 

OR C0f^0PiN& » 





oertitrpYA 
MS. mi ON A 
PiKPf SOUP SPOON 

anp catch 
aips t Vev 

VNPtRSTANP 




Garfield 



By Jim Davis 




Peanuts 



By Charles Schulz 



HEY-'uWERE'S EVERVSOPV 
60IN6 ? COME BACK 




\f TME SUN 15 "T 

1 WEAKIN6THRWW!/ 





PART TIME StTTER needed lor tour children ages 5. 
5. 3. I. Dependable, responsible, own transpose 
lion necessary References, experience preferred 
539-1521 d-3r 

LIVE IN SITTER Single parent needs after school' 
evening care Boy 9. gin 8 Free rent, utilities, 
meals Conveniences washer-dryer, microwave, 
cable VCR Two block* from campus Call Pat. 
539-0*37 |3 6) 

RESPONSIBLE BABYSITTER needed to watch ener 
getic *m ysarold boy Monday, Wednesday and 
Friday or Tuesday tor stew hours Need own trans 
Donation Call Sueal 537-1 103 12 31 

tMflOTMENT 08 

GRILL COOKS needed days or evening* Apply in 
person, Bobby T>. 32*0 Kimball, across from Geo 
Park (1-5) 

NEEO PART TIME person to work in the showroom ot 
Standard Plumbing Must nave some plumbing ev 
parlance Call tor en interview 776 5012 <i 12) 

ACADEMIC SERVICES Coordinator Develop and co 
ordinate academic as si stance component for rugn 
school students, teaching experience with high 
school student* from diverse environments es- 
sential, BS required. MS preferred m education. 
counseling, child development or related field 
119,000 Job description available upon request 
(phone 913/532-8497) Send latter ol intent, re 
sum* and nemesrphone numbers ol three refer 
encesby Aug 28 1967 to Director. Upward Bound 
Program. 202 Ho It on Hall. Kansas State University. 
Manhattan. KS 66506 KSU is AArEOE 11-31 

NOW HIRING Part-time evening and weekend grill 
cooks 10-20 hours/week Apply in person lit 
Soul n 41 h , T he Ch et Cale i i 1 1 

DATA ENTRY Operator Student Assistant -Pre 
Admission* Unit Up to 20 hours per week through 
December Musi be available in two or more hour 
time blocks Possible continued employment 
through spnng semester at reduced hours Re 
quire* accuracy, reliability lamihariiy with com 
pulers and office procedures Selection criteria 
will include GPA prior related computer eipen 
ence and longevity Starting salary 13 35 per hour 
Application* available in Anderson Hall Rm 119 
Closing data Aug 28 EOE (1 5) 

TUTOR -COUNSELORS lor area high school pamei 
pan I a in Upward Bound Education meters with an 
emphasis in Math, English or Science are encour 
aged to apply KSU students, junior status or 
above, minimum GPA 3 12- 15 hours'week. lien 
bie schedule Ability lo work with diverse groups 
13 SOVhour, preference lo work study students Ap- 
plications available Upward Bound Program. 202 
Hotion Hall. 532-6497 Applications and transcript 
due Sept 2. by 5 p m KSU is AA/EE employer ( 1 21 

STUDENT RECEPTIONIST Admimsfntive User Set 
vices is seeking a friendly, energetic student for a 
variety of duties including receiving visitors an- 
swering the telephone copying, tiling, typing, and 
word processing Up to 30 hours per week possi- 
ble Hours available, communications skills, and 
typing skills wilt be used lo evaluate applicant* 
Contact Debbie Hyde. Anderson 21. 532-6281 by 
Sept 1st to apply d-3) 

STUDENT PROGRAMMERS Administrative User 
Services is recruiting to tut two student program 
mar positions starting immediately Programming 
enpenence with COBOL and OS'JCl in an IBM 
*381 MVS environment required Positions involve 
■dministrative application* programming Appli- 
cable e« penenca. grade point average, and Ion gev 
>ty potential will be u»*d lo evaluate applicants 
Contact Debbie Hyde. Anderson 21 532-8281 by 
Sapi 1st to apply (131 

KANSAS CAREERS needs a student with eicep 
1 1 on a I word processing and clerical skills lo work 
afternoons sianmg Sepl t Dbas* 3 skills preter 
red Submit application, letter, resume and rater 
encesby Aug 28 to Kansas Careers, Fairchild Hsu 
304, Kansas Stale University. Manhattan. Kansas 
66506 Kansas Slat* University I* an Equal Oppor 
tumty Employer (1 51 

PA RT T IME WO RK I u 1 1 1 im* pay I ' ' C hflstme* A round 
The World needs are* demons I raters 1 Seasonal 
Your own hours. No cash investment, collecting 
or delivery Pali 1 236-5429. Adel a 639 2930 oi Tarry 
537-3948 (1 10) 

COLLEGE STUDENTS earn 16-10 per hour working 
part-time on campus For more information call 1- 
800 932 0528 (1-3) 

HAVE FUN and make money too. with Avon 539 
1938 (1 -51 

LUNCHROOM PLAYGROUND Supervisors "ft to 2 
hour* per day 11 am lo 1 p.m 53 87 per hour Ap- 
ply to USD *383. 2031 Poynti, Manhattan, KS 
68502 913 537 2*00 EOE (2-8) 



GIRL FRIDAY, 16-20 hoursfweefc normally 5-6 15 
p m. mandatory other hours your schedule Own 
transportation references Evening meal prepare 
lion, and some child care Call alter 6 30 p m eve 
nlngs. weekends 776 5552 (2-6) 

SCHOOL BUS Drivers beginning immediately S4 75 
par hour, must be 2 1 years of age, have a good driv- 
ing record and complete a training piogram Bus 
driving eipenence not required Hours 8 30 to 
6 30 a.m and 2 40 to 4.30 pm Job description 
available Apply lo USD »383 2031 Poynu Avenue 
Manhattan, Kansas 68502, 913-5372400 EOE |2B| 

UNIQUE WOMEN S store opening October m Man- 
hattan Full-time manager needed retail experi- 
ence preferred Submit resumes lo Bo« 6 va Code 
gian 12 5| 

VALENTINO'S IS now hiring pure preparation for day 
and nighttime help Apply at 3019 Anderson horn 
2:45 104pm on Wednesday (2-3l 

VALENTINOS IS now hiring waiters, waitresses and 
hostesses lor day and nigh it, me help Apply at 
3019 Anderson from 245104pm on Wednesday 
(2-3) 

LIBERAL MAIDrcompamon needed weekdays to 
keep house and care lor handicapped husband. 42, 
with broken leg Call 776-8584 between t and 8 
pm. |2-4| 

HOUSES AMD M08ILE HOMES FOB RENT ~7T 

THREE BEDROOM, furnished will accommodate 
three students Two bathrooms. TV room, no pels, 
no children 1375 plus uliliiies. one-year lease, or 
10 month lease 539-8608 I nil 

MULTi BEDROOM HOUSE stove, refrigerator can 
trai air. iireptace laundry hookup*, garage Call 
537-S3B9 I tin 

RENT OR sell Rent negotiable, unfurnished, stove 
and refrigerator, washer! dryer connections, child 
or small cat ok Call 763-4386 or 775-2230 ll-3i 

THREE BEDROOMS Neat to campus, clean stove, 
relrigerator. gas heal: water trash paid, couples 
no pels. 539-3609 12 4i 

HOUSES ANO taOULI HOMES FOB SALE 13 

1975—2 bedroom. 14 x 70 mobile home at Wamut 
Grove Appliances, central air. New deck with awn 
mg, chain-link fenced yard, storage shed, carpels 
(new throughout! W*i I papered redecorated 1 
month ago 494 2720 (i 5i 

19S4 AMERICAN Mobile Home. 14 K 60 two- 
bedroom, central unheal, located ai Colonial Gar 
dens Lot 332. very clean book value II 3.000 make 
oiler i 482 33H or 482 3523 (15) 

KS PARENTS/atudenis Don t waste money ranting 
Buy and recover your investment at re-sale ot la* 
time Beautiful one-year-old three-bedroom two 
bath mobile home Fully furnished, all appliances 
539711901537-0104 |1 51 



99 

Oief 

Ml S. 4th 

Downtown 



RIB-IT 

Ticry TuoeAY 

Niaht 

AU You Can Est 

im i 13.93 

BBQ Rita * Pnei 

Hiked Beam 



CLOTHES WITH CLASS 

I SPELLMnders ■ I 

[Uii.nii.ili! 

( jridi^wfjitsti (. tntff ■ **' JOKimhill Avfouf? 

Mjohavrijr,. >.,|i|U« 



MUN- SAT. 10-5 



FOR SALE -Super single wafarbed, plywood post 
construction healer 150 Call 776 751 1 after 6 p m 
12 5) 

DRAFTING TABLE 31 ' » 42" with parallel bat, porta- 
ble, fits on desk top real nice' Rob. 532-6078 Ask 
ing (36 |2 5| 



GoncM 
Owe 

418 Poymz 



TUESDAYS 
TNT 

3 tacos $ 1 

99c Margaritas 

4-7 p.m. 



MOTOnCrCLES/BICYCLES FOR SALE 



18 



COMMUTER BICYCLES 24 inch I tames Peugeot 
ISO Schwinn Continental wilh rack S45 Call 537 
4236 1 1 2l 

MIVATA RACING bike 56cm, good condition, sun- 
tour component 5350 Call 539-5625 12-6) 

MEN'S TEN speed, very good condition ISO 537 
0460 (2-6) 

YAMAHA DT40O Enduro Excellent condition 5450, 
extras 494 2756 12-6) 



PERSONALS 



II 



TRI DELTS He res to a year ol lun. because Home 
coming will prove ware number 1 Let's party, the 
men ot Phi Delta That a 121 

TO WHOM it may concern— Im back 1 Love, Elihea 

at 



LOST ANO FOUND 



14 



LOST IN Aggieviiie -Gold watch, black face and dia 
mond Please return— very important Knsh While 
(539-75711 |2| 

FOUND. MALE puppy, approximate It sin months 
old. short blonde hair Found in Shop Ouik parking 
lot. across Irom Goodoow 537 1096 |2-4| 



PROFESSIONAL SERVICES 



20 



PROMPT ABORTION and contraceptive services in 
Lawrence 913841 5716 ittn 

PREGNANT 1 BIRTHRIGHT can help Free prefl 
nancy teal Conlideniiai Call 5379180 103 S 
Fourth 5t Suite 25 uili 



MISCELLANEOUS MERCHANDISE 



15 



SEVEN PIECE woodlremed furniture set (sofa 
chairs, end tables!. 1200 Phone 7768313 |1 3) 

TWO STUDENT sua matching desks, on* with chair 
525 and 535 Phone 539-6875 between 5-7 p.m (t 3i 

FOR SALE AMfFM cabinet stereo, great sound 
good condition Call Chris or Dave. 5394656 (1-31 

' FREE 

Hors d'oeuvres 
10 p.m.-Midnight 
Monday-Thursday 



RENTALS 



Z1 



SUPPLIES PRINTER- typewriter Rental typewriters 
available, correcting and non-correcting Hull 
Business Machines. 715 North 12th, Aggieviiie, 
539-7931 (111) 



RESUME/TrPIHG SERVICE 



22 



PAPERS RESUMES cover letters, tneses and dis- 
sertations entered, stored and -completed 10 your 
speciiicaiions Letter-Quality prmier. Come see 
us Ross Secretarial Services, 614 N 12th (across 
Irom Kites) 539-5147 (i 51 



ROOMMATE WAHTEO 



23 



m 



University ^'Club 

17th & Anderson, 539-7531 

ALVARE2 GUITAR Like new, ,75 Call 539-2446 12-3) 



ROOMMATE NEEDED desperately -Own room, 
plus lots ol extras Very nice— Winston Place, 
J 1 70 plus utilities Barbara 5397464 (1-3) 

ROOM AND board for male, wilt do laundry Call 494 
8249 (1-S| 

ROOMMATElS) NEEDED to share live-bedroom 
house 5100 lo 5150 a month plus utilities Russ, 
Steve, 452-5814 leave message (2 51 

WANTED: ROOMMATE lo share two bedroom apart 
men I. $165 per month plus one-halt bills. Call 776- 
012* 12-6) 



Crossword 



By Eugene Sneffer 



ACROSS 
1 Oodles 
S Tower 

site 
9 Central 
12" — 

Rhythm" 

13 "QB VII" 
author 

14 < aviar 

15 Walls Cox 
role 

17 Depot: 
abhr, 

18 Spanish 
ci»in 

19 Kusy 
perfuirif 

21 "Man of — 
MafK'ha" 

22 Creole 
setting 

24 Titled 
lady 

27 Trot 

28 A wood 
wind 

31 Qo awry 

32 Fin-: 

I lllllHj 

33 liar 

Kan until 

34 Tax filing 
need 

36 Actor 
(team 

37 European 
capital 



38 The 

Woman — " 

40 Choice 
word 

41 Hummer's 
instru- 
ment 

4.1 t'r.'iiusk 
sight 

47 Pitching 
stat 

48 "Devi) and 
Daniel 
Webster" 
devil 

51 Apiece 

52 Hemingway 
sobriquet 

53 Ac I rt ->s 

Got 



54 Smidgin 

55 Celeb 

56 Right 
less birds 

DOWN 

1 No longer 
fresh 

2 Monster 

3 The best 

4 TVs 'Rem 
ington — " 

5 Insect 
stage 

6 Wrath 

7 Polite 
title 

8 Test gold 

9 Toby 
Tyler's 
chimp 



Solution time: 26 mins. 




Yecterdty'a aiuwer 



10 Bit 

11 Costly 
16 ( .rei-k H 
20 Addition 

ally 

22 Sparred 

23 Elderly 

24 Grassy 
glisten 
ing 

25 Skill 

26 TV 
science 
expert 

27 Tarzan's 
mate 

29 Lubricate 

30 Conceit 

35 Song- 
writer 
Yoko 

37 Decora- 
tive 

39 Frolics 

40 " - Miss 
Brooks" 

41 Main 
laitn-il 

42 Scope 

43 Cicatrix 

44 Watch 
part 

45 Beige 

46 Thai's 
partner 

if Scoundrel 
50 Health 
resort 




CRYPTtHJUIP 
5-29 

ICY ZSIG.CXMAZItUS HRY- 

S O X V I K M RSQZNNGS, *Z'Q 

J X I D A Z I 1 Z X 11 N U D Q G ' 

Yesterday '• Cryptoqulp: HUGE TERM PAPER ON 
MARATHON RUNNING CONTAINS FASCINATING 
F(M)TNOTES. 

Today's Cryptnquip clue: N equals T 



MP 



> HI 



1111 M 



14 



KANSAS STATE COLL1QIAH, T uM dlf. AugiW* ». 117 



Superpower summit unlikely 



By Trw Associated Press 

SANTA BARBARA, Calif. - Reagan 
administration officials said Monday that 
another U.S.-Soviet summit would be unlike- 
ly unless the superpowers were in virtual 
agreement on a treaty to eliminate 
intermediate-range nuclear weapons. 

Chief presidential spokesman Marlin Fitz- 
water emphasized anew that "there have been 
no contacts with U.S. officials" indicating 
that Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev 
wants to meet with President Reagan in 
Washington following a visit to the United 
Nations in New York in September. 

Fitzwater and State Department spokes- 
woman Phyllis Oakley also said that Gorba- 
chev was not expected to visit the U.N. 

But Fitzwater said Gorbachev has a longs- 
tanding invitation to visit this country, and 
"we don't want lo send too negative a mes- 
sage" in response to possible overtures by the 



Officials say 
Soviet leader 



nothing 
to visit 



implies 
Reagan 



Soviets. 

"We've never set any conditions," he said, 
"I think it is generally recognized by both 
sides, however, that the most natural basis for 
a summit would be the completion of the 
arms control talks." 

The administration comments came amid 
speculation about a possible third summit 
between President Reagan and Gorbachev, 
triggered by a Los Angeles Times report Sun- 
day that the Soviet leader wanted to meet 
with Reagan, even in the absence of an agree- 
ment to eliminate whole classes of 
intermediate-range, or INF, missiles. 

At a briefing for reporters who accompan- 



ied the president to California for the presi- 
dent's annual summer vacation, Fitzwater 
said U.S. officials were taken aback by the 
Times story. 

The newspaper, in its Monday editions, 
noted the State Department denial of the ear- 
lier story indicating a possible Reagan- 
Gorbachev summit in Washington. 

But, citing "non-Soviet sources familiar 
with U.S.-Soviet contacts,*' the paper reaf- 
firmed that the United States government has 
been advised through private channels of 
Gorbachev's plan to attend a General 
Assembly session at the United Nations in 
September, and that the Kremlin leader 



would be prepared to follow that with a meet- 
ing with Reagan in Washington. 

"We don't have any foundation for those 
stories," Fitzwater said. "There's no indica- 
tion that the general secretary (Gorbachev) 
has made any overtures towards coming in 
September, and no contacts have been made 
that we're aware of." 

Fitzwater indicated that Reagan is not 
interested in another summit with Gorbachev 
unless a nuclear arms reduction pact is virtu- 
ally signed, sealed and delivered beforehand. 

He noted that Reagan has given Gorbachev 
an open-ended invitation to come to the 
United States but said "we have not received 



a response to that." 

While no strings were attached to the invi- 
tation, the spokesman said, "I would say that 
if any summit is held in the United States, it 
would be associated with the signing of an 
arms control agreement." 

U.S. and Soviet arms negotiators have 
been meeting regularly in Geneva, but an 
agreement on banning U.S. and Soviet 
shorter-range missiles in the INF class appa- 
rently is hung upon a dispute over whether72 
Pershing 1 A missiles held by West Germany 
would be convcred by such a pact. 

A senior U.S. official, speaking on condi- 
tion of anonymity, said the administration 
does not want a repetition of the ill-starred 
U.S.-Soviet summit at Reykjavik, Iceland, 
last October, when Reagan and Gorbachev 
held serious discussions about major reduc- 
tions in nuclear arsenals. 

Those talks collapsed when Reagan 
refused to accept Soviet attempts to limit his 
"Star Wars" missile defense program. 



Ten Soviet teen-agers 
arrive in United States 



By Th» Associated Press 

FREEPORT, Maine -- A group of 
Soviet teen-agers arrived Monday in 
Samantha Smith's home state to continue 
the citizen diplomacy the Maine school- 
girl began in 1982. 

The 10 Soviets, who are traveling 
around the East Coast at the invitation of 
the Samantha Smith Foundation, stopped 
first at the headquarters of outdoor outfit- 
ters L.L. Bean Inc., the mail order store 
whose retail center has become a tourist 
mecca. 

Later, the youths traveled to the Capi- 
tol in Augusta, where they and a group of 
American students paid tribute to 
Samantha. 

Samantiia, 13, died wither father Aug. 
25. 1985, in a fiery plane crash two years 
after she traveled to the Soviet Union in 
the name of peace. 

She gained international attention 
when she wrote a letter to Soviet leader 
Yuri Andropov in December 1982, 
expressing concern about war between 
the superpowers. 

Andropov replied in a letter pledging 



that his country never would be the first 
to use nuclear weapons. At his invitation, 
Samantha and her parents visited the 
Soviet nion in the summer of 1983. 

Arriving in Freeport en route to a 
week long camping stay near the central 
Maine coast, the children from Lenin- 
grad spent an hour browsing and buying 
at Bean's. 

Tatyana Nikitina, 16, who said she was 
"looking for sports shoes for my sister," 
recalled meeting Samantha four years 
ago at Camp Artek on the Black Sea. 

She said seeing "so many people with 
open faces and open hearts" brought the 
memory of the meeting freshly to her 
mind. 

Halfway through an 11 -day tour that 
has already featured stops in Washing- 
ton, D.C., and Boston, Miss Nikitina said 
she and her friends had a keen interest in 
the United States. 

The girl and her companion, 15-ycar- 
old Tatyana Turikova, said their families 
were happy about the visit. Speaking 
through an interpreter, they said their 
mothers instructed them not to "fool 
around." 



Court ends textbook case 

Ruling may 
be appealed 



By Th» Associated Press 

NASHVILLE, Tenn. — A federal appeals 
court has thrown out a case in which seven 
families alleged their First Amendment rights 
were violated by public school textbooks 
they said offended their Christian beliefs, the 
state attorney general said Monday. 

However, a lawyer for the families said he 
would appeal the case to the U.S. Supreme 
Court. 

State Attorney General W J. Michael Cody 
said he had been advised of the 6th U.S. Cir- 
cuit Court of Appeals by the court's clerk, 
and that the case had been sent back to U.S. 
District Judge Thomas G. Hull"with instruc- 
tions to dismiss it." 

"We are very pleased," Cody said of the 
appellate ruling. 

In an earlier ruling, Hull had ordered the 
Hawkins County Board of Education to pay 
the families for private school tuition and 
other expenses, totaling more than $50,000. 

The court of appeals threw out the 
damages. 

Hull ruled Oct. 24 that the school board 



violated the families' civil rights by ignoring 
their religious beliefs and requiring their 
children to read the assigned texts or leave 
school. 

Michael Farris, who represented the fami- 
lies, said in a telephone interview that the 
decision by a ihiec-judgc panel of the Court 
of Appeals in Cincinnati would be appealed 
to the U.S. Supreme Court 

"We always viev ed this level of the deci- 
sion as just a whistlestop on the way to an 
ultimate decision by the U.S. Supreme 
Court," said Farris, who represents Con- 
cerned Women for America, a group that 
supports the families. 

"There is absolutely no support in legal 
precedent for such a narrow, limited view of 
the First Amendment," Farris said. 

But lawyer Timothy Dyk, retained by Peo- 
ple for the American Way to represent the 
Hawkins County Board of Education, called 
the Court of Appeals decision "a wonderful 
decision. I think it's a great triumph for the 
public school system." 

Dyk said reversal of Hull's decision "will 
allow them (public schools) to go about their 
business the way they have for generations." 

The parents sued the board in 1983, claim- 
ing that the required Holt, Rinchart, Winston 
books violated their beliefs by teaching evo- 
lution, secular humanism, the occult and 
other anti-religious beliefs. 



The parents listed more than 300 objec- 
tions to the Holt reading series, including 
passages from "The Diary of Anne Frank," 
which was said to instruct that all religions 
arc equal in God's eyes, and from "The 
Wizard of Oz," said to contradict the Bible's 
lesson that all witches arc bad. 

The lawsuit also objected to passages in 
stories by Margaret Mead, an anthropologist, 
science writer Isaac Asimov, and Hans 
Christian Andersen, famed writer of fairy 
talcs. 

Rebecca Hagelin, spokeswoman for Con- 
cerned Women for America, said the parents 
did not object to the stories as much as they 
did to what she called recurring themes of 
feminism, the occult and other beliefs. 



Research 
saves lives. 



o 



American Heart 
Association 

WEPE FIGHTING FOR 
VOURLIFE 




J«8SSS 






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now onty 49* . 

Koh-i-noor ? Pen Drafting Set suggesteO Retail 
$78.50 our Price $31.99. 



Check out our Josten s Closs Ring Special during the 
first week of classes. 

k of Die Pens regularly sell for 35* each. Dig 
f 10 only $1.98. 

Derol Flexxer mechanical pencils 2 pk. .7mm lead 



c 

T» 
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AT THE BOOKSTORE . . . 



Zenith Computers at super low prices. Most models 
in stock. 



Vinyl 3- Ring Binder assorted colors. $1.80. 



100 WATT Swingarm Lamp. Your choice of colors: 
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/ Windsor Newton Giant 200ml Acrylic points — Quy 
I ra*f 4 tubes get 1 200 ml tube of Titanium white 
ytJ Acrylic free — While Supply Lasts! 

P^Eastpack Fash'n Pok 6 colors to choose from reg. 
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■ 



mmmm 



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umm 



^B^H 


Sorbets and Such 


With the dog days of summer 
here, frozen deserts become 
appealing treats that beat 



Weather 



Mostly cloudy Wednesday with a 50 
percent chance of showers and 
thunderstorms, high 75 to 80. Show 
ers and thunderstorms likely 
Thursday, 




«tS?" Stat* '-"--.. 



there.* bet? i %-" 



■vis 
Jin 



Wednesday 

August 26, 1987 



Kansas State University 

Manhattan, Kansas 66506 

Volume 94, Number 3 



Kansas State 



Collegian 




Two legislators ask 
for compact debate 
at special session 



Haymaker Handyman 

Roger French, junior in electrical engineering, saws a board out- 
side Haymaker Hall. French receives assistance from fteano Banu, 



Si»ff/Br»d Fmihier 



freshman in recreational therapy. The two were constructing 
bunk bed For French's room Tuesday afternoon. 



By Staff and Wire Reports 

TOPEKA — Two House Derno- 
crats are urging their colleagues to 
allow debate on the state's member- 
ship in a regional low-level radioac- 
tive waste compact during the special 
session of the Kansas Legislature, 
which begins Aug. 31. 

Representatives Kathleen Scbc- 
lius, 56th district, and Del hen Gross. 
111th district, sent letters in mid- 
August to all 125 House members, 
asking them to pass a resolution 
allowing debate on the Central Inter- 
state Low- Level Radioactive Waste 
Compact issue. 

Gross and Scbciius said ihey want 
the issue considered during the spe- 
cial session because it will be too late 
to consider it during the 1988 Legis- 
lature, which convenes in January. 
Their letter noted that a host state for 
a regional dump must be chosen 
before then because of congressional 
deadlines. 

'This is not a partisan issue, nor is 
it a parochial issue," Gross and Sebe- 
lius said in their letter. 

The compact has sparked opposi- 
tion from some officials and resi- 
dents who think Kansas has a good 
chance of becoming the host stale for 



the dump site. The compact com- 
prises Arkansas, Kansas, Louisiana. 
Nebraska and Oklahoma. 

During the 1987 Legislative ses- 
sion, attempts to pull the state out of 
the compact failed in the Senate, and 
a withdrawal measure did not get oui 
of a House committee. 

Gov. Mike Haydcn has repeatedly 
said he thinks staying in the compact 
is the state's best alternative for 
handling its low-level radioactive 
waste. But he has said only the Legis- 
lature has the ability to pull the state 
out of it, 

"We agree with his assessment, 
and we feci that the matter requires 
our review in the special session," 
Gross and Sebclius said in their 
letter. 

Haydcn called the special session 
to have lawmakers consider a com- 
prehensive highway program. He 
and Republican legislative leaders 
have said they want to limit the spe- 
cial session's agenda to avoid a prot- 
racted session. 

"I think they have some genuine 
concerns about the issues raised by 
the compact," said Joe Knopp. 67th 
district representative and House 
Republican leader. 



Radon tests detect dangerous levels 



By Judy Lundstrom 

Special Projects Editor 

Water may not be the only conta- 
mination problem in Riley County. 

The atmosphere could be tainted 
as well, according to an ongoing 
survey by the Kansas Department of 
Health and Environment and the 
Environmental Protection Agency. 

About 21 percent of the 1,000 
Kansas homes screened for radon 
last winter and spring showed levels 
in excess of the action level of 4 pico- 
curies per liter set by EPA, said Craig 
Schwartz, KDHE radiation control 
inspector. 

In Riley County, nine of 25 homes 
tested — 36 percent — exceeded the 
action level. 

Schwartz said the agencies 
surveyed the private residences to 
determine whether radon posed a 
health threat in the state. Nine other 
states in the country arc undergoing 
similar tests, he said, and an addition- 
al seven will begin testing this 
winter. 



Agents find radiation in houses 



Radon, an odorless, radioactive 
gas, results from the breakdown of 
uranium and is found naturally in 
soil, rocks and building materials, 
Schwartz said. Outdoors, the gas is 
diluted to concentrations that are not 
high enough to cause concern. But in 
enclosed areas, he said, the gas can 
accumulate to dangerously high 
concentrations. 

Home radon testing/Page S 

EPA officials believe exposure to 
high levels of radon cause between 
5,000 and 20,000 lung cancer deaths 
each year in the United States. 

The EPA has established compar- 
ative health risks based on individu- 
als spending 75 percent of their time 
in a dwelling for 70 years, Schwartz 
said. 

Residences with a radon level of 



less than 4 picocuries per liter could 
pose a health risk equivalent to 
smoking about eight cigarettes a day 
or having more than 200 chest X-rays 
per year, according to the EPA. 

Exposures in this range are consid- 
ered average or slightly above aver- 
age for residences, Schwartz said. 

Levels of 4 to 20 picocuries per 
titer are considered above average 
for residential structures, he said, and 
could pose a health risk similar to 
smoking one pack of cigarettes a day. 

Radon levels between 20 and 200 
picocuries per titer arc considered 
"grcaUy above the average for resi- 
dential structures" and could pose a 
health risk similar to smoking two to 
four packs of cigarettes a day, 
Schwartz said. 

"Action should be taken within 
several months to reduce the radon 
level as much as possible," he said. 



One of the levels detected in Riley 
County was 25.5 picocuries, the sec- 
ond highest reading in the state. The 



Counties with highest 


radon level detected 


■ 


Johnson 


27.2 


■ 


Riley 


255 


■ 


Ness 


24.6 


■ 


Meade 


24.3 


■ 


Barton 


23.5 



highest was in Johnson County with 
a level of 27.2 picocuries, Schwartz 
said. 

Other states tested and the percen- 
tages of residences in which radon 
was detected above the action level 
were Alabama, 6; Connecticut, 19; 
Kentucky, 17; Montana, 9; Rhode 



Island, 19; Tennessee, 16; Wiscon- 
sin, 27; and Wyoming, 26. 

While state officials believe the 
high radon levels indicate a signific- 
ant health hazard, others see the tests 
as just another cancer scare. 

"Radon has been around forever," 
said John P. Lambert, K-State direc- 
tor of public safety. "It's nothing to 
be alarmed about. People should be 
aware of it and be cautious, but not 
get alarmed." 

Lambert said radon tests are not 
conducted in buildings on campus. 

"Since we're not in these buildings 
24 hours a day, testing here isn't that 
necessary," he said. Furthermore, he 
said, the budgets don't cover radon 
testing. 

Schwartz said the households 
tested last spring were randomly 
selected by a computer and were 
taken in the lowest livable area of the 



homes for two days under closed 
conditions in an attempt to record the 
maximum indoor radon levels. 

The results, he said, are considered 
a screening measurement and are not 
necessarily a reliable measure of the 
average annua) radon level to which 
a family is exposed. 

Schwartz said one of the reasons 
for higher radon levels in homes 
today is because homeowners arc 
practicing ughtcr ventilation control, 
which forces tnc gas to accumulate 
inside. 

While some radon comes from the 
materials in a house, the majority 
comes from the soil and seeps into 
homes through foundations and 
cracks, he said. 

Reducing the radon levels in a 
house is a fairly simple process that 
involves providing more ventilation 
and sealing cracks, Schwartz said. 

KDHE and EPA will complete tnc 
study this fall and winter with testing 
of an additional 1,600 residences, he 
said. 



Saudis censure Iranian terrorism 

Iran vows 
to stage 
rallies 



By The Associated Press 

JIDDA, Saudi Arabia — Saudi 
Arabia called Iran's government a 
"group of terrorists" Tuesday and 
said its forces would deal firmly with 
any Iranian attempts In attack this 
nation's Moslem holy places or its 
vast oil fields. 

In Tunis, meanwhile, Arab League 
foreign ministers decided to give Iran 
until Sept. 20 to accept a United 
Nations Security Council resolution 
calling for a cease-fire in its 7-year- 
old war with Iraq. 

"Saudi Arabia has enough defense 
capabilities to repulse any Iranian 
aggression," Interior Minister Prince 
Nayef warned Tuesday. 

'In ihc past the Iranians tried to 



attack eastern Saudi Arabia and had 
one of their warplanes shot down. 
We will not hesitate to deal similarly 
with any aggression." 

Nayef, a brother of King Fahd, 
announced a get-tough policy to head 
off any demonstrations by Iranian 
pilgrims in the Saudi holy city of 
Mecca, where hundreds died in 
clashes with police last month. 

His comments came hours after a 
senior Iranian cleric, Mahdi Karoubi, 
said pilgrims from Iran would con- 
tinue to stage political rallies in Mec- 
ca. Karoubi was quoted by Iran's 
official Islamic Republic News 
Agency, monitored in Cyprus, as 
saying such rallies were a political 
obligation for all Moslems in addi- 
tion to the religious rituals. 

Iran's ambassador to the United 
Arab Emirates, Mustafa Haeri, dis- 
missed the impact of a possible U.N. 
arms embargo as trivial and said Iran 
was testing new missiles and was 
capable of blocking the Strait of 
Hormuz. 

Haeri said in an interview in Abu 



Dhabi that Iran continued to buy 
weapons on the free market despite a 
loose Western embargo imposed 
since the Iran-Iraq war broke out in 
September 1980. 

A government official in Tehran, 
the capita! of Iran, meanwhile denied 
accounts by reporters and U.S. sour- 
ces of an encounter Monday between 
U.S. warships and an Iranian war- 
ship, saying the reports were 
designed to show off military power. 
IRNA did not identify the official. 
Kuwaiti tankers flying the Ameri- 
can flag have been navigating the 
gulf under U.S. naval protection. 
There were conflicting reports on 
movements of Kuwaiti tanker move- 
ments. Shipping sources said a new 
convoy sailed into the gulf Monday, 
but the owners denied it. 

Nayef warned Tuesday that Iran 
would not hesitate to shoot down any 
Iranian plane that attacked the king- 
dom's Eastern Province, site of the 
world's largest oil fields. 

In June 1984, Saudi warplanes 
shot down an Iranian warplane over 



the province, shortly after Iran and 
Iraq began attacking each other's 
scabound oil shipments. 

Iran's Parliament speaker, 
Hashemi Rafsanjani, has called on 
the world's Moslems to overthrow 
Saudi Arabia's ruling family and 
seize its oil wealth. 

Nayef said Iranian activists last 
month tried to seize the Grand 
Mosque of Mecca. 

He said Saudi security forces were 
prepared to "strike firmly and deci- 
sively against any attempt by Iranian 
pilgrims to manipulate the pilgrim- 
age season for political purposes." 

But Nayef said the kingdom would 
not "reciprocate terror with terror." 

Nayef said Iranian pilgrims now 
will be investigated before being 
admitted to the holy places. Iranian 
pilgrims are usually the largest single 
group going to Mecca. 

Saudi Arabia has been the key 
U.S. Arab ally since the Islamic revo- 
lution in Iran ousted the pro- 
American Shah Mohammad Rcza 
Pahlavi in 1979. 



First day figures 
show enrollment 
increase of 596 



By Collegian Staff 

K- State's enrollment tentative- 
ly increased for fall 1987. 

First day figures were up 596 
from last year's first day figures, 
said Robert Krause, vice president 
for institutional advancement. 

Enrollment as of Monday was 
14,912, as opposed to a year ago 
when enrollment was 14,316, 
Krause said. Final enrollment 
numbers will be computed on the 
20th day of classes, Sept. 21, 
when night classes and off- 
campus enrollments will be 
added. 

"If our historical pattern of 
enrollment increase between pre- 
liminary hcadcount and 20th day 
finals holds, the University should 
comfortably exceed 18,000 head- 



count this fall," Krause said. Final 
enrollment for fall 1986 was 
17,599. 

The increase of close to 600 
students is "the result of a tre- 
mendous mass of effort by every- 
one," Krause said. 

He attributes the successful 
recruiting and rclainmcnt effort to 
the admissions representatives, a 
publications system, colleges 
which concentrate on academics, 
increased funding for scholar- 
ships by the KSU Foundation, and 
the Manhattan Chamber of 
Commerce. 

On the 20th day of classes 
Krause will examine final enroll- 
ment figures, compare them to 
past figures, and set goals for the 
following year. 



V 



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r 



— «» 



mm 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Wwiirtdiy, Aufltwl 28, 1987 



Briefly 



Hart refuses to discuss plans 

NEW YORK — Gary Hart returned Tuesday from a ihree-week 
vacation in Ireland, stopping at an airport in New York just long 
enough to refuse comment on reports that he may rejoin the pres- 
idential race. 

"I'm not going to make a statement here today or anywhere else 
today." Hart said as he was met at Kennedy International Airport by 
about 100 reporters and photographers. 

Shielded by police and airport security guards, Hart told the 
crowd: "After I get a chance to get together with my family and 
find out more about the events that have transpired in the last few 
days, I'll have something to say, but I'm not going to make any 
other statement here today." 

The former Colorado senator, who quit the campaign May 8 after 
The Miami Herald reported he spent part of a weekend with actress- 
model Donna Rice, then brushed past the reporters and onlookers 
and ignored further questions. 

On Friday, Hart left a rented cottage in the fishing village of 
Oughterard to avoid reporters after his former campaign manager, 
Bill Dixon, said that it was "likely" the former senator would rejoin 
the presidential race. 

Lunch not in violation of Act 

EMPORIA — The Lyon County Commission did not violate the 
slate Open Meetings Act when members had lunch June 4 with 
three people at an Emporia restaurant, the atlomcy general's office 
has ruled. 

The attorney general's report said an agent investigated the com- 
plaint filed by Donald C. Krucger, an Emporia lawyer, but found 
that the commissioners and other men did not meet at the restaurant 
to discuss business. 

Krueger filed the complaint after hearing two of the men lunching 
with the commissioners ask about zoning requirements. 

He was critical Tuesday of the attorney general's finding but 
added, "I would hope that this has put the county commission on 
notice that the good old days of conducting business in private arc 
over and that the public arena is the only place to conduct 
business." 

The report was sent Friday to Lyon County Attorney Rodney 
Symmonds, who made the findings public. 

Kansan to appear with Carson 

ELLSWORTH — A 105-year-otd Ellsworth resident is to appear 
as Johnny Carson's guest today, and her friends expect her fcistincss 
to enliven the 'Tonight Show." 

Mildred Holt, who flew to California Monday, was unimpressed 
with the glamour of Hollywood. 

"I'm not excited about it at all," she said from her hotel room. 
"They talked me into it, and here I am waiting for Wednesday to 
come so I can go back to Kansas. I wouldn't live here for anything 
— it's too big." 

After Mrs. Holt turned 105 July 17, her friend Dorothy Grothuscn 
sent a letter to the 'Tonight Show." The producers then had some 
trouble getting in touch with Holt to ask her to appear on the show. 

Friends said she spends most of her time outside the home she 
shares with her daughter, Catharine Merydith. playing bridge, lend- 
ing her rose garden or traveling to Alabama to visit another daught- 
er. When she is home, she crochets afghans and helps care for her 
103-year-old niece. 

"She's just an amazing woman," Grothusen said. "She says, 'I'm 
to ornery to die."' 






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Governor stuck in elevator 

NEW YORK — New York's governor, who'd just done an inter- 
view with CNN's Larry King, got into an elevator at (he Pcnn Plaza 
building with his wife and 12 other people. The elevator got stuck 
on the way down, 

"Everything was out but the light," said Cuomo aide John Iaccio. 
"It was pretty hot in there." 

'The governor was the governor; he kept everybody cool and at 
ease," Iaccio said. "At one point, he started singing 'Getting To 
Know You.* It broke everybody up." 

When rescue workers arrived, they told the trapped group to force 
open the doors to sec if they were near a floor and could climb out, 
said Iaccio, The group found, however, that they were stuck exactly 
between the first and second floors. 

Told they had to get the doors shut again before ihe elevator 
could be moved, Cuomo grabbed the doors and proceeded to get his 
left hand slammed between them. 

"He's in some pain," said Cuomo press secretary Gary Fryer on 
Tuesday. 

Emergency workers eventually lowered the elevator manually, 
freeing the group after more than half an hour. 

Bolshoi Ballet sees Disneyland 

ANAHEIM. Calif — Dancers and musicians of Moscow's Bolshoi 
Ballet put on iheir Mickey Mouse caps and took a break from thcir 
Los Angeles engagement for a look at entertainment American-style. 

The artists, wearing mouse-car caps, ran to have their pictures 
taken with park employees dressed as Mickey and Minnie Mouse. 

The Mickey Mouse character was a familiar memory from child- 
hood, said Galina Ulanova, 78-ycar-old ballet master of the troupe. 
She said through an interpreter that Monday's trip was her fourth to 
Disneyland. 

"A great deal has changed since I was last here 10 years ago," she 
said. "There arc a great number of people and many new buildings, 
but this is a very interesting adventure." 

"Washington was not like this," she added, referring to an earlier 
slop on the Bolshoi's U.S. tour. 

Reporters were limited to talking to the ballet master and Andris 
Liepa, a principal dancer. But Liepa refused to answer any questions 
after one reporter asked him about the defection to the West earlier 
this month by four Romanian circus acrobats. 

Former hostage to give talk 

DENVER — Charles Glass, the ABC correspondent who escaped 
from captivity in Lebanon last week, will make his first U.S. speak- 
ing appearance Sept. 22 at a meeting of the Economic Club of 
Colorado. 

The journalist, who escaped from his Moslem captors earlier this 
month, will address members of the business organization at the Wcs- 
un Hotel here, club executive director Terry Kalil said Monday. 

Glass, 37, was abducted in Beirut on June 17. He said he escaped 
by slipping out of his shackles while his guards were sleeping, 
unlocking the door and sneaking down several flights of stairs to the 
street 

Kalil said that at Glass's request, she would not release information 

on his fee. 

"His feeling was that if it was discussed it would be misinterpreted 
in the Middle East." she said. "He is concerned that if we talk about 
whether or not he is being paid, people holding hostages in Lebanon 
might say, 'Let's grab a few more hostages and we'll show how capi- 
talistic these Americans are."* 



3 



^ 
* 



WELCOME BACK KSU 

TRY US TODAY 

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•Relaxing Pleasant Atmosphere 
•Specialties! Chimichangas- 
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Open Daily at 1 1 a.m. 
1219 Bluemont 539-3166 



Campus Bulletin 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

CAMPUS ORGANIZATIONS are 

encouraged lo use Campus Bulletin All 
announcement! muit be submitted by II a.m. 
the day before publication. Announcements 
tor Monday's bulletin must be in by 11 a.m. 
Tuesday. Information forms arc available at 
the table outside Kediie 103. Forms should be 
left in the mailbox at the table after being filled 
out. All submissions must be signed and are 
subject to verification, 

TODAY 

SPEECH UNLIMITED meets at 3:30 
p.m. in Nichols t.E Squad Room. 

THURSDAY 

AG AMBASSADORS meet al 6 p.m. in 
Waters 137. 

UNIVERSITY FOR MAN, INC. will 
have a table in the Union from 10 a.m. to 2 



p.m. for fall class registration. 

HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION 
INTEREST GROUP meeu al 4:30 p.m. in 
Call Dairy Bar. 

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL hat sche- 
duled the final oral defense of the doctoral dis- 
sertation of Karen Burgart Hoehse at 9 am in 
WaierOG. The dissertation topic it Xontroll- 
ing Viscosity of Com: Hour Water Systems." 

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL tuts »che- 
dulcd the final oral defense of the doctoral dii- 
scnalion of Prathivadi B. Ravikumar at 2 p.m. 
in Durland 1 29. The dissertation topic is "3-D 
Rational Cubic 8 Spline Approximation of 
Space Curve Data Given in 3-D Coordinates 
or 2-D Projection Coordinates." 



Next time you feed 
your face, 



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-j£T~\ Open 
■vi 






FACULTY AND STAFF MEMBERS: 

Don't be left out of the 1987-1988 
K-State Campus Directory. 



Be sure to get your 1987-1988 K-Statc Campus Directory listing 
updated. Personnel Services provides the faculty/staff list for the 
directory and if individuals have not updated their records, the 
directory entry is inaccurate. We would like your assistance in 
updating the faculty /staff listings. 

The following information is needed for individual listings: name, 
home address, campus address, home phone, campus phone, faculty/ 
staff title, and office/deparrment/division. 

Please take a few minutes to check last year's directory. If anything 
has changed, form. PER 39 must be completed and submitted to 
Personnel Services by Aug. 28. Aug. 28 is also the deadline to submit 
individual "Personnel Appointment" forms (PER 39) for 
unclassified and classified individuals and GST forms for graduate 
student employees. 

Anyone wishing to withhold his or her name from the directory 
must submit a letter to Personnel Services by Aug. 28. 



If you have questions, please contact Sheila in Personnel 
Services, Employee Benefits and Records, 532-6277, 




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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, W*dn*»d*y, Angmt », 1987 



Director 

forecasts 

activities 



By Jenny Chaulk 
Campus Editor 



Construction of the Bramlage Col- 
iseum is right on schedule if not a 
little bit ahead, said Charles E, Tho- 
mas, ncwly-namcd director of the 
coliseum. 

Thomas, who was the associate 
director of The Sun Dome at the Uni- 
versity of Tampa in southern Florida, 
began his duties as of Aug. 1, He said 
ihe coliseum should be fully opera- 
tional by July 1988. The original 
completion date of the facility was 
October 1988. 

Activities to take place in the the 
coliseum will be decided by Thomas, 
who is in charge of achieving maxi- 
mum use of the building. He said he 
will be contacting local, state and 
regional agencies and organizations 
in order to promote the building. 

Thomas said some of the planned 
uses for the coliseum include trade 
shows and a wide Variety of family 
entcrtainmcnL Thomas said he also 
wants to use the facility to attract 
concerts and rock shows appealing to 
the students. 

"Students are hungry for the larger 
rock acts that Topcka and Kansas 
City attract," Thomas said. "I feel 
that by using the building to attract 
that type of entcrtainmcnL it will also 
be attracting more and more students 
to K-State,". 

The coliseum will be the fourth 
largest in the Big Eight conference. 

Its capacity will be 13,500 for 
sporting events. About 14,000 scats 
will be available for entertainment 
events. The 500 additional seats will 
be located on the floor of the 
coliseum. 

"Facilitating the use of the build- 
ing with other events, along with the 
regular men's and women's basket- 
ball season, is what really makes a 
building good," Thomas said. 



619 N. Minhnun 

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Ilbr S39-9081 Office 776-6638 1 




Blue Key faces difficulty 
in getting oath amended 



By Deron Johnson 

Editor 



Although the K-Staic chapter of 
Blue Key has asked the national 
office to remove pledges of God and 
country from its constitution, the 
organization's national leader said 
similar requests in the past have met 
with overwhelming opposition. 

The local chapter voted last spring 
to suspend references to God and 
country after a column by Scott Mill- 
er appearing in the Jan. 28 Collegian 
criticized the honorary fraternity's 
constitution. 

Richard F. Reichcrtcr, national 
administrative officer, said the K- 
State chapter is the only one in the 
nation currently experiencing con- 
troversy over its constitution. Reich- 
ertcr, whose office is based in 
Emporia, said the K-State chapter 
contacted him last spring regarding 



the change. 

"My suggestion is for them at the 
national convention to submit their 
request," he said, adding the conven- 
tion is scheduled for 1988. 

The K-State chapter isn't the first 
to request striking religious elements 
from the constitution, he said. 

"Back in the early 1970s, I would 
say it came up a couple of times," 
said Reicherter, who has been asso- 
ciated with Blue Key for nearly a 
quarter of a century. 

He estimated that at that time the 
national chapter was "about 95 per- 
cent against" removing the refer- 
ences. He wouldn't predict if the 
request would have more success in 
1988. 

Reicherter stressed that the nation- 
al office allows local chapters to 
maintain autonomy. Rarely will the 
national chapter interfere with the 
local ones, he said. 



"I think the local autonomy is very 
high," he said. "The national lets the 
local do what it wants to do on the 
local level." 

The K-State chapter recently 
elected Steven Johnson, senior in 
agricultural economics, as its presi- 
dent. He succeeds Kelly Welch, a 
spring graduate. 

Johnson, who served as student 
body president during the 1986-87 
academic year, said he is assessing 
the situation before determining 
what needs to be done. He said he 
wants to meet with Welch another 
time before the chapter's meeting 
Sunday. 

"If they've got it wrapped up and 
they can hand us the proposal, then 
it's pretty much taken care of," he 
said, adding the group's immediate 
priority is sponsoring Homecoming 
Oct. 17. 



Court rules warnings adequate 



Slifr/Giry Lytic 

Kelly Briggs, Manhattan, bulldozes dirt from the interior of the Fred 
Bramlagc Coliseum. Construction should be completed in July 1988. 



By The Associated Press 

BOSTON — A federal appeals 
court ruled today that warnings of the 
hazards of smoking on cigarette 
packs arc sufficient to protect tobac- 
co companies from lawsuits stem- 
ming from smokers' sickness or 
death. 

The suit against Liggett and Mey- 
ers and Liggett Group Inc. was 
brought by the heirs of Joseph C. Pal- 
mer of Newton, who died in 1980 at 
the age of 49. He smoked up to four 
packs of L& M cigarettes daily for 23 
yean, according to the suit. 

The Liggett and Meyers appeal 
stemmed from a federal judge's rul- 
ing in April 1986 that health warn- 
ings on cigarette packages do not 
protect tobacco companies from 
lawsuits. 

In a long-awaited ruling, the 1st 



U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals said 
that in requiring the warnings. Con- 
gress intended to fulfill an education- 
al purpose but also intended to con- 
tinue the free flow of trade without 
harm to the national economy. 

The court also said that many pre- 
cedents set by other cases where peo- 
ple were harmed by dangerous pro- 
ducts did not necessarily apply 



because "cigarette smoking, at least 
initially, is a voluntary activity." 

The Palmer suit blamed his death 
on smoking and claimed the defen- 
dants were negligent in failing to pro- 
vide adequate warnings about the 
risks of smoking. The companies 
claimed the federally required warn- 
ings about the hazards of smoking 
shielded them from liability. 



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ICAT 

Students That Back The Cats 

ICAT Membership Function 

Sunday, Aug. 30, 7 p.m. 

at Kite's Bar & Grill 

All ages admitted 

This will be an excellent chance to talk with the 
athletes and coaches. Head Football Coach Stan 
Parrish will speak, so come to Kite's and get fired up 
for a great fall semester. If you're not a member of 
ICAT yet, this will be a super time to join. 

Upcoming Events 
Sept. 4, 7 p.m. - Kickoff '87 in Aggieville. ICAT will 
co-sponsor this pep rally in Aggieville on the eve of 
the first football game of the year. 25* Hotdogs and 
FREE watermelon will be served. Willie the Wildcat, 
the K-State marching band, the players and coaches 
and hundreds of fans will join together for a evening 
of K-State enthusiam. 

Sept. 5, 4 p.m. - What a day in KSU Stadium! A 
Catbacker Barbecue will be held from 4-5:30 p.m. on 
the grassy area northeast of the football offices. Cost 
of the meal is only $3. KSU and Austin Peay State 
kickoff at 6 p.m., and following the game Willie 
Nelson will perform a concert. On Sept. 5, KSU 
Stadium will definitely be the place to be! 

Look for our table in the Union 

Thurs. & Fri. 

for further information. 



CABl£!SGiQICE*IV 



Offering 

CABLE TV Service 

to KSU Students 

in Manhattan 

and 

NOW ALSO 

in the 

KSU RESIDENCE HALLS 

Contact our office for your 
installation or Residence Hall 
Students should refer to Staff 
Assistant or Hall Director for 
lobby installation hours. 

MANHATTAN CABLE TV 

610 Humboldt 776-9239 



Closed Classes - Fall 1987 



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Editorial 



H l l » I 



Kansas State Collegian ■ Wednesday, August 26, 1987 ■ Page 4 



Kansas State Collegian 



EDITOR 

Deron Johnson 
MANAGING EDITOR 

Becky Lucas 
NEWS EDITOR 

Jeff Biclscr 



EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR 

Christine Doll 
PHOTO/GRAPHICS EDITOR 

John Thclander 
ADVERTISING MANAGER 

Judy Goelz 



EDITORIAL BOARD: Judd Annis, Kirk Caraway, Jenny Chaulk, Christine Doll, 
Michael Krueger, Deron Johnson, Candy Leonard, Becky Lucas, Judy Lundstrom, 
Michael Nichols, Patti Paxson, Chad Sanbom 

1 ' 1 1 F t'O L l. EC 1 A N ( USPS 1 9 1 01 ) i* publiihed by Student Pu b lie Mi art In c , K > m • i S 'j le I ,'ra » cr» ii y , a i il y during ih c f i U 
*nd fprini (emu cicept S«turd«yi. Sundiyj. holidtyi tnd UniveMiiy vtcttion period*. OFFICES «re in the nonh wing of 
K«lac Hill, phone S32-6S55 SECOND CLASS POSTAGE pud ■ MtnhalMn. Kin. 66502 SUBSCRIPTION RATES: 
ulmdiryw, 140; iddemie yar. 135, lemener, I2ft wmmerlerm, 110 Addrai ctunfci ind leniti loiheediiorihouldbe 
jeni lo the Kinui Suie CoUtgun, Kniiie ttiU 103. Kinui Sun Univeniiy. Manhiuin, Kin. 66506 



County should assist 
people hurt by landfill 



The good news came July 17 for 
residents living by the Riley County 
Landfill, 

That was the day the Kansas 
Department of Health and Environ- 
ment ordered the landfill to shut 
down because of water contamina- 
tion problems in the area. Residents 
had been fighting the problem since 
the first contamination was detected 
in November 1985. 

Then came the bad news. 

The landfill will stay in operation 
until a new form of waste disposal is 
instituted for the county. And the 
deadline for the new system is July 
1990 — nearly five years after the 
contamination was discovered. 

Riley County commissioners 
began to address the issue last April, 
when they approved a water district 
to supply city water to the affected 
residents. Now, four months later, 
they are still taking bids for con- 
struction of the system. 

In the meantime, residents are 
hauling their water from Manhattan. 
To assist them, the county has pro- 
vided them with 5 -gallon water 
coolers. 

How convenient. 



While residents wait for their new 
water system, the county is at work 
devising a closure plan for the land- 
fill, as ordered by KDHE. 

Fine and dandy. But why wasn't a 
closure plan already devised? 
According to KDHE regulations, 
every licensed landfill in the state 
must have a closure plan on file from 
the day it opens. The Riley County 
Landfill was licensed by KDHE in 
1 976, and has never had such a plan. 
Yet KDHE has continued to license 
the site each year. 

It's no wonder Moehlman Bot- 
toms residents are frustrated. In 
addition to watching their land value 
rapidly deteriorate, they are being 
plagued with calls from water purifi- 
cation salesmen and companies who 
want to test their water. Some resi- 
dents have said they are ready to 
pack up and leave. 

But they can't afford to. The con- 
tamination has ruined more than just 
their water. 

July 1990 is 34 months away. The 
least the responsible parties could do 
is show some sort of effort to allevi- 
ate the situation as quickly as 
possible. 



All deserve applause 
for higher enrollment 

The news is out — enrollment fig- 
ures for the fall semester at K-State 
are up. The University deserves a 
round of applause for its successful 
recruiting and retention efforts. 

Thanks to new programs imple- 
mented by a gung-ho, forward- 
thinking administration, people are 
once again recognizing the Universi- 
ty as one of the best "buys" in the 
state. The administration has put 
much effort into improving both 
recruitment and retention. But, the 
individual colleges have also work- 
ed with the administration in coordi- 
nating the recruitment effort. With- 
out everyone working together, the 



numbers would not have been so 
astoundingly positive. 

Numbers in all quadrants of the 
University are on the rise, including 
new student enrollment — up nearly 
1,000 — residence hall occupancy, 
and sorority and fraternity pledging 
numbers. 

Now that the University has 
achieved success in the numbers 
game, their attention must focus on 
improving the quality of education 
offered to the students they have 
attracted to campus. This is the sur- 
est way of retaining students and 
attracting more students for the 
future. 



Bring back the purple 

Pride built through activities 



"All right, team, we've got an important 
game ahead of us. I want to see everyone fired 
up and ready to go! You've got to be a parti- 
cipant, not a spectator! Now. give it every- 
thing you've got, and let's go!" 

If you've ever been involved with any kind 
of organized sport, no doubt you've heard 
some variation of those words at one time or 
another. It's called a pep talk. It's designed to 
motivate the hearer into some desired course 
of action, chiefly through emotionalism. 
Most coaches don't phrase it in quite those 
delicate of terms, but you get the idea. Well, 
here's a litdc pep talk of my own, to get you 
psyched up for the year ahead. 

First, let's talk purple. You know, your 
school colors: purple and white. What, no 
purple in that dresser drawer? You'd better 
remedy that right away. Go out and get some 
appropriate K-Statc clothing. And I don't 
care what you've heard, it's not "uncool" to 
wear shirts from your own school. Purple 
pride used to be legendary, and it's high time 
v.c brought it back. If you're not sure where 
to shop for this new wardrobe, consult Pro- 
fessor Donncrt in nuclear engineering. He's 
our campus expert on proper K-State dress. 
Oh. by the way, that obnoxious "Beak 'em 
Hawks" shirt...wcll. it's got to go. 

Now that you're wearing the proper uni- 
form, you can't sit on the sidelines watching 
other people play the game. It's time to get on 
the field. You can even pick your position. 
I'm talking about involvement. There are 
countless ways to get involved on campus. In 
your living group, there arc offices, commit- 
tees and councils you can serve on. In student 
government, students serve on committees. 



Commentary 




. •* \{ 


1 


Doug 

Folk 

Collegian 
Columnist 



judicial boards, the student body president's 
cabinet or Student Senate. In the colleges, 
there are college councils, honor societies, 
ambassadors, magazine staffs and profes- 
sional societies. There are also ethnic societ- 
ies, church groups and clubs for almost every 
imaginable interest. Intramural competition 
is provided for dozens of individual and team 
sports. Wallyball, anyone? 

Maybe it's OK to sit on the sidelines and 
watch part of the time, when you 're watching 
K-State athletics. Have you bought your foot- 
ball tickets yet? Why not? The football team 
is never any good, you say? Well, I'm sorry, 
my fair- weathered friend, but you've missed 
the point entirely. Disregarding the fact that 
the football team has a chance to be good this 
year, you're cheating yourself by not attend- 
ing the games while you have this chance. 

There's a lot more to going to a college 
football game than being able to say, "the 
'Cats won." You 're supporting your own col- 
lege football team. You're having fun with 
your friends, listening to the band, eating hot 
dogs and nachos, drinking pop (straight, of 



course) and hopefully getting to experience 
that burst of excitement when the 'Cats score 
a touchdown. And you certainly don't have to 
be a sports freak or a football expert to enjoy 
it. You may have other opportunities to watch 
football games later on, but never again like 
this. Now, when you're dressing for the 
game, make sure you pull something from 
that new purple wardrobe of yours. Nothing 
looks better than a student section beaming 
purple. 

Of course, since we arc attending college, 
we need to get psyched up for classes. After 
all, a degree is what we're all after, and our 
classwork should have lop priority. But it is 
possible to get so absorbed in our classwork 
that we miss out on the various other learning 
experiences that college offers us. To para- 
phrase Mark Twain, "Don't let schoolwork 
get in the way of your education." 

Now I could ramble on for hours about all 
the different things there are to do on campus. 
In addition to the activities I've already men- 
tioned, there are concerts, plays, movies, con- 
vocation speakers, McCain events... the list 
goes on. My point is you need to get off your 
duff and look for what interests you. Look 
through the phone book, make a few calls or 
just ask somebody. I'm not suggesting that 
you should try to get involved in all these 
activities, or even a large number of them. 
Certainly don't get so involved that your 
classwork suffers. But I do suggest you take 
advantage of the opportunities that college 
offers you. You have chances here and now 
that you may never have again. Don't let 
them slip by. 

OK, team, hit the field. 



The 
Club 



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The Gun 



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The Diplomat 



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Letters 



Campus flowers 

Editor, 

The flower bed planting on campus this 
year 

Was handled at random — it would 
almost appear 

What's lacking in taste is made up for in 
size 

For a somewhat ambivalent feast for the 
eyes. 

Helen Brockman 
Manhattan resident 

Blue Key problems 

Editor, 

As a native Kansan who has done a lot 
of traveling throughout the United Stales, 
the issue of Kansas leadership has bothered 
me for some time. K-State's Blue Key 
chapter seems as good an example as any. 
The issue over whether to profess belief in 
God and country as an organizaion is the 
supposed controversy. 

The real issue is that of Kansans being 
able to decide for themselves what they 
want In pratice, Kansas makes a decision, 



then sits patiently by, waiting for a nod of 
approval from either die East or West 
Coast before proceeding. 

Kansas has natural resources, money and 
some of the smartest people in the country. 
The problem is our leadership. Our local 
institutions support organizations like Blue 
Key. 

I know enough Kansans to observe that 
membership problems are not caused by 
hangups concerning the belief in God and 
country. Blue Key members and leaders 
are simply scared of the opinions of those 
in other pans of our nation. 

The least they could do is change their 
color name. Members have shown their 
true color, and it is yellow. 

Scott Hugh banks 
freshman in horticulture 

Contra ctffair 

Editor, 

After weeks of Iran-Contra hearings we 
must alt feel somewhat like a hungry per- 
son, finishing a huge meal, yet unsatisfied. 
There is, however, a radio propam which 
brings it all into focus. 



"Conlragatc: The Secret Team," is a 
two-hour program featuring Daniel Shec- 
han, chief attorney for the Christie Insti- 
tute. He discovered a secret U.S. "intelli- 
gence" team. It has operated with and with- 
out presidential approval for the last 27 
years. Its present members include Richard 
Secord. John Singlaub, Oliver North, and 
Albert Hakim. More important, however, 
are two figures that thus far eluded the 
limelight, Thomas Clincs and Theodore 
Shackley. This team assassinated political 
leaders and innocent civilians, smuggled 
drugs into the United States and used the 
profits to supply arms to "anti-communist," 
regimes. 

The team began in 19S9, after Castro 
threw out Batista and his business partners 
in Resorts International, a mafia business 
worth millions in pmbling and prostitu- 
tion. Then Vice-president Richard Nixon 
started an NSC "Project 40" in order to 
reclaim U.S. influence in Cuba. The mob 
offered to help. Their tools were assassina- 
tion and sabotage. 

Although unsuccessful, the team 
changed and grew as it moved on to Laos, 
Vietnam, Chile, Iran and most recently. 



Central America. While there, they literally 
bombed the drug king Von Pao's competi- 
tion off die map. 

Shackley was also a partner with Hakim, 
Secord, and Edwin Wilson die man who 
got 54 years for selling weapons to Kha- 
dafy. They stopped the investigation with 
Wilson, however, letting the others escape 
prosecution. The man responsible? Frank 
Carlucci. 

If you would like to hear the program, 
contact your public radio station. 

David Norlin 
Concordia resident 

Editorial misleads 

Editor, 

Recendy, 1 read terveral articles con- 
cerning the lack of black faculty members 
on the K-State campus. I am sure we need 
to do more to attract qualified black faculty 
members. However, to label K-State facul- 
ty as "basically all white male," as a Colle- 
gian editorial did, is stretching the claim 
too much. I checked with the affirmative 
action office recendy and counted about 
150 researchers and professors listed under 



the minority faculty category. This number 
may not be too large, but certainly it is not 
negligible on a campus the size of K-State. 
Among those listed are some of die most 
distinguished scholars working at K-State. 

I believe sincere efforts to locate quali- 
fied female and minority faculty members 
are constantly being made at all levels of 
hiring. I was chair of a search committee 
not too long ago, and I can tell you the 
process is not easy. You have a fair chance 
of telling that an applicant with a name 
such as "Fung Yee-Chak" is a minority 
member, but if you have an applicant with 
a name such as "Lynn Smith," you have no 
way to tell if the person is a mate, a 
female, a black or a white — and you are 
not supposed to ask directly, either. 

Daniel Fung 
professor of food science 



LETTERS TO THE EDITOR per- 
taining to matters of public interest are 
encouraged. All letters must be type- 
written or neatly printed and signed by 
the author. They should not exceed 300 
words. 






. .a «. j~ 



— » - - 
















M 



Testing for radon simple 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN. Wdrwday. Augual 26, 1967 



Inspector 

suggests 

measures 



By Judy Lundstrom 

Speciol Projects Editor 

When it comes to radon testing, 
homeowners can take action on their 
own. 

Testing a residence for high radon 
levels is a simple and inexpensive 
process, said Craig Schwartz, radia- 
tion control inspector for the Kansas 
Department of Health and 
Environment. 

The EPA has authorized approxi- 
mately 100 companies throughout 
the country to conduct the tests for 
homeowners at a cost of $ IS to $20, 
he said. 

Schwartz said homeowners should 
be leery of non-certified companies 
who offer to conduct the tests. 

"Some of these companies are 
really questionable," he said. "We 
recommend they use the listed 
companies." 

The tests are conducted by expos- 
ing a small canister of activated char- 
coal to the atmosphere under closed 
house conditions in the lowest live- 
able area of the home, Schwartz said. 
After two days, the canister is sent to 
EPA's radiation laboratory in Mont- 



We need you. 



Statewide Radon Risks 




Enrollment figures 
may peak in 1989 
for Kansas colleges 



Darkest areas Indicate highest risk Source: Kansas Geological Survey 



gomery, Ala., for analysis. 

Homes that indicate radon levels 
of less than 4 picocurics per liter are 
not much of a concern, he said. Expo- 
sures in this range can present "some 
risk" of lung cancer, he said, but 
reduction of levels this low may be 
difficulu and often impossible, to 
achieve. 

For radon levels of 4 to 20 picocu- 
rics per liter, action to reduce the 
level should be taken within a few 
years, he said. 

[f the levels are between 20 and 



200 picocuries per liter, action 
should be taken within several 
months to reduce the level. Levels of 
more than 300 picocuries per liter 
require immediate action to reduce 
the level, Schwartz said. 

In the event action is necessary, 
the best way to reduce radon levels in 
a house is to increase the ventilation. 



Mar? Ward/StalT 

Schwartz said. Another way is to 
patch cracks in the foundation, where 
the gas can seep in from the soil. 
Additional information on radon 
and actions which can reduce high 
radon levels can be obtained from the 
Kansas Department of Health and 
Env ironment, Air Qual ity and Radia- 
tion Control, Topcka, Kansas 66620. 



By The Associated Press 

TOPEKA - The enrollment 
increase of the 1980s in Kansas' 
public and private colleges is 
expected to peak during the 
1989-90 school year, then begin 
receding in the next decade, the 
Legislative Educational Planning 
Committee was told Tuesday. 

The Legislative Research 
Department, which makes enroll- 
ment projections, said actual 
enrollment in the six regents uni- 
versities, Washburn University, 
medical and veterinary medicine 
schools, Kansas Technical Insti- 
tute, community colleges and pri- 
vate colleges was 139,856 during 
the 1986-87 school year. 

The researchers' projections, 
which use census data to estimate 
how many college-age people 
there will be in Kansas in a given 
year, showed ihc state can expect 
to have about 143, 1 00 col lege stu- 
dents in 1989-90. 

The total will build to that peak 
from estimates of 141,160 this 



year and 141,720 in 1988-89. 

After the peak year, the projec- 
tions show the college enrollment 
declining to 141,800 in 1990-91 
and to 139,300 in 1991-92. 

Julian Efird, a research depart- 
ment staffer who works with the 
educational planning committee, 
said more accurate projections are 
expected next year, when newer 
census data is expected to be 
available. 

He said this year's projections 
for the committee are based on 
somewhat dated census figures, 
some of them going back to 1 970. 

Actual Kansas college enroll- 
ment totals for all schools prior to 
this past year included 1 37,286 in 
1982-83, 138,491 in 1983-84, 
137,157 in 1984-85 and 137,548 
in 1985-85. 

Historically, about 85 percent 
of the total enrollment arc under- 
graduate students and about 15 
percent arc- graduate students. 
That ratio is expected to continue 
under the projections. 



WERE FIGHTING FOR 
VOURUFE 

American Heart | 
Association 



KSU RODEO 
WELCOME 

BARBECUE 

Thursday, August 27 

7 p.m. 
3002 Stagg Hill Rd. 

f It will be an, informal evening of outdoor fun. 
► Anyone interested in joining or learning mortr abouMhe 
KSU rodeo program is welcome. 

* This program is for both contestants and non-contesting 
rodeo enthusiasts, 

* Bring yourself, a friend, and the beverage of your choice. All 
else will be provided. 

* There will be an executive meeting at 6:30. All new officers 
are expected to attend. 

* Team member card applications and eligibility forms will 
also be distributed. Team members, BE THERE. 





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and it's good to know 
that help is immediately 
available. Our staff of 
skilled health care profes- 
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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, W«dn«wtay, Au?u»' ». 1M? 




Staff/Jim Diet/. 

Charlie Part low, director of the hotel and restaurant managment program, has seen an increase in work 
and also in his job title with the addition of hotel managment lo the program. 

Partlow becomes part of plan 
for hotel, restaurant courses 



By Jim Dietz 

Collegian Reporter 

Though the environment has 
changed little, the job has changed 
considerably for Charlie Partlow, the 
new director of the hotel and restaur- 
ant management program. 

The program has increased its title 
and curriculum to include hotel man- 
agment in order to better prepare for 
the future. 

"According to the United States 
Commerce Department, the hospital- 
ity industry will be the nation's 
largest by the year 2000," Partlow 
said. 

Partlow added that with more lei- 
sure time and more disposable 
income, traveling and eating out is 
becoming almost a necessity. 

"That's why our program is so 




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important," Partlow said. "People 
have the right to expect competent 
professional management in these 
facilities." 

The hotel and restaurant manage- 
ment program is also emphasizing 
hospitality skills, which seem to be 
an important concept in the Ameri- 
can market place today, he said. 

This fall is the first semester stu- 
dents will be working at the Univer- 
sity Inn as a part of the hotel opera- 
tions class. The class requires them to 
spend 96 hours of work at the hotel, 
including observation and hands-on 
experience. The students will work 
under the managers and departmen- 
tal supervisors of the University Inn. 

Partlow, raised in Blylhcvillc, 
Ark., received his bachelor's degree 
at Mississippi State University in 
foods and nutrition. He did his gradu- 



ate work at Southern Mississippi 
University in institutional adminisra- 
lion. After getting his master's, he 
worked as a manager for ARA Ser- 
vices, a contract food service in 
Atlanta. 

In 1984, he began his doctorate 
work at K -State and finished it this 
summer just before his position took 
on another facet., 

Partlow plans to strengthen the 
bonds between the program and the 
Marioit Corp., which owns a nation- 
wide chain of hotels and resorts, by 
tying Mariou into other courses in 
hotel and restaurant management. 

The tics with Marriott are also 
beneficial because of internships. 

"They've told us they will place 
students just about anywhere in their 
conference centers and hotels in the 
United States," he said. 



Aviation 



• Flight In $1 r uc I ion 

• Biennial Flight Revisw 

• Instrument Competency Chuck 

• Air Tours 

• K State Flying Club Inluimalion 

Dale L. Causey 
913539-1090 




The Tradition Continues 
After two days of school 
you need a break - 
come down for some 
good rock & roll. 
1 120 Mora 776-7668 



Motion for new Bird trial filed 
after more evidence revealed 



By The Associated Press 

EMPORIA An amended 

motion seeking a new trial for former 
Emporia minister Thomas Bird on 
his conviction in the 1983 death of 
his wife was filed Monday in Lyon 
County District Court 

The motion filed by Monte Miller, 
Bird's court-appointed attorney, 
seeks the new trial on the basis of 
newly discovered evidence that it 
says indicates Sandra Bird may have 
committed suicide. 

Judge Gary Rulon will hear the 
motion on Sept 1. 

Mrs. Bird was found dead in the 
Cottonwood River near Emporia in 
July 1983 in what was first ruled to 
be a traffic fatality. 

But in 1985, after Bird had already 
been convicted of solicitation to 
commit murder in an unsuccessful 
plot to kill the husband of his secret- 
ary, Bird was convicted of first- 
degree murder in the death of his 
wife. 

The former secretary, Lorna 
Anderson Eldridge, pleaded guilty lo 
solicitation in the unsuccessful plots. 



i 



THE ANSWER IS— 
PUTT PUTT GOLF 
WHEN LOOKING FOR 
SOMETHING TO DO. 



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532-6554 



and earlier this year she was charged 
with the first-degree murder of her 
first husband, Martin Anderson, slain 
in Geary County in November 1983. 

That latest charge against Mrs. 
Eldridge came just before the broad- 
cast of "Murder Ordained," a CBS- 
TV mini-scries portraying a love 
affair between her and Bird and the 
slayings of their spouses. 

The motion seeking a new trial for 
Bird says the state failed to disclose 
information to the defense at the time 
of his murder that. 

In the amended motion, Miller 
said (he Kansas Bureau of Investiga- 
tion interviewed potential witnesses 
in 1984 about the possibility that 
Mrs. Bird committed suicide. That 
information was not included in writ- 
ten reports provided to Bird's attor- 
ney prior to the trial, the motion said. 

Miller also claims that the KB I 
told the witnesses that the informa- 
tion about suicide was not relevant 
because the possibility of suicide had 
been ruled ouL 

"Introduction of this evidence 
could reasonably have resulted in the 
acquital of ... Thomas Bird," Miller 



said. 

Last week Rulon granted Miller's 
motion ordering County Attorney 
Rodney Symmonds to provide the 
defense with any KBI reports of 
interviews with witnesses about the 
possibility that Mrs. Bird committed 
suicide. 

Witnesses expected to testify at 
next week's hearing include the Rev. 
Charles Smith and his wife, Caroline, 
of Richmond, Va„ and the Rev. Al 
Boysen and his wife, Patricia, of 
Memphis, Tcnn. The court certified 
them last week as material witnesses 
in the case to ensure their return to 
Kansas for the hearing. 

Bird's lawyer said that Mrs. Boy- 
sen and Mrs. Smith had heard Mrs. 
Bird speak of killing herself. 

Mrs. Bird's body was found in the 
river near her overturned car below 
the Rocky Ford Bridge southeast of 
Emporia. Subsequent investigation 
after Anderson was slain led to Bird 
being charged with murdering his 
wife. 

He is serving a life term on that 
conviction, along with 214 to seven 
years for criminal solicitation. 



The 



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Today, Forum Hall, 7:30 p.m. 

and tomorrow, Little Theatre, 

3:30 p.m. & Forum Hall, 

7:30 p.m. 

Si. 75 KSU ID Required; Rated PG. 




A young college 
professor 
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tries to raise a 
five-year-old 
chimpanzee like 
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Unfortunately, 
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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, W«dn»td«y, Augwl 28, 19A7 



Flags signal danger 




Physician 

develops 

indicator 

By The Collegian Staff 

Kansas' heat and humidity ate 
weather conditions to be reckoned 
with, especially for people who exer- 
cise outdoors. 

So, to indicate heat stress condi- 
tions, Dr. Guy Smith, sports medi- 
cine specialist at Lafene Student 
Health Center, and his staff have 
begun flying flags. 

"I sec a lot of people out running 
when they shouldn't be, because it's 
not safe," Smith said. 

A new flagpole located on the 
north side of Aheam Field House is 
the home for four flags. The colors of 
the flags indicate relative heat stress 
conditions. Blue indicates low risk, 
yellow indicates moderate risk, red 
indicates high risk and black indi- 
cates extreme danger. 

The flags may be changed three 
times per day: 11 a.m., 2:30 p.m. and 
4:30 p.m. 

Smith said Lafene purchased a 
heat stress meter in 1986. The meter 
provides a numerical index to heat 
stress conditions by evaluating read- 
ings on wet ball, dry ball and radiant 
heat thermometers. 

Smith sajd it is important to mea- 
sure all variables relating to heat, not 
just the temperature. These variables 
include humidity, sunlight, radiant 
heat and the cooling effect of the 
wind. 

Smith said he had wanted to get 
the heal stress monitor in service in 
the summer of 1986. Problems erect- 
ing the flagpole, however, delayed 
the first flying until Thursday. 

"1 think it (the heat stress monitor) 
is a real good idea," Smith said. "It's 
a nice, simple service to provide to 
recreational athletes. And there arc a 
lot of recreational athletes." 



You're never too old 
to quit blowing smoke. 



A "heat stress advisory flag," monitored by Dr?Guy SfnttnTJWMene Sfti-' 
dent Health Center, is flown at the northeast corner of College Heights 
Road and Denison Avenue. Smith established the flag to let people who 
exercise outdoors know the heat intensity during the day. 



Get Personal 
in Collegian Classifieds 



■ 



A health care 

product 

that's right 

for today! 

It's called SHARED PAY 
COMPREHENSIVE and it's 
designed to provide top 
protection on the big end of 
hospital and doctor 
bills. . with rate control front 
end shared pay features. 

SHARED PAY 
COMPREHENSIVE is a 
product for the times. It's 
quality protection with 
students assuming reasonable 
out-of-pocket responsibility. 

Students share in the cost of 
services. Students pay 50% of 
the bill until $250 is paid out 
for a single contract and S 500 
for a family contract. Once the 
shared pay maximum has been 
paid out, then Blue Cross and 
Blue Shield pays 100% for 
covered services. 

Services provided at Lafene Student Health Center are 
covered 100%, 

It's competitively priced, and It's from Blue Cross and 
Blue Shield of Kansas. 

Find out about it firsthand Contact Lafene Student 
Health Center, Student Government Office, or the local 
Blue Cross and Blue Shield office. 

Effective date of coverage will be August 24, 1987. Final 
enrollment will be September 14, 1987. 



Blue Cross and Blue Shield 

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[913) 539-4861 
2314 Anderson. Suite 205 
Manhattan. Kansas 66502 




City commissioners discuss 
proposed renovation projects 
of service center. Sunset Zoo 



By Candy Leonard 

Government Editor 

Expansion and remodeling 
plans for the Sunset Zoo and Riley 
County Seniors' Service Center 
were the main topics at the work 
session of the Manhattan City 
Commission Tuesday. 

Zoological Planning Associates 
Inc. presented its long range plans 
for the Sunset Zoo. Mike Rice 
explained to commissioners the 
proposed remodeling plan, which 
makes use of existing facilities to 
help bring the Zoo up to the stan- 
dards necessary for accrcdidation. 

According to city officials, the 
first step in accrcdidation was the 
removal of the animal shelter. A 
new animal shelter will be built as 
pan of the Quality of Life bond 
issue. The second step is to fence in 
the Zoo grounds and upgrade some 
of its facilities. 

"We're not increasing the Zoo 
space -wise," Rice said. "This plan 
is just a more effective use of the 
land." 

Rice said the master plan priorit- 
izes the modifications and will 
require $3.2 million in capital 
investment. Through a comparison 



study, he said the attendance 
potential of the "new zoo" would 
be 120,000 visitors annually. 

Rice's plan also suggests for 
commissioners to consider an 
admission fee. Based on a fee 
structure of SI. 50 for adults and 
S0.75 for children, the zoo could 
generate approximately $200,000. 
Rice said he wanted to get some 
feedback before he comes to the 
commission for final approval. 

Marguerite Carlson, director of 
the Seniors' Service Center, told 
commissioners that either prog- 
rams would be cut back or the 
building would have to be 
enlarged. She said the Center plans 
on serving half of the 5,000 older 
adults in Riley County this year 
with its programs. 

Carlson said she has worked in 
conjuclion with the Council on 
Aging and they want to consider 
adding an additional 9,000 square 
feet to the current structure at 412 
Leavenworth. 

"We want the Senior Center to 
be the focal point foraging in Riley 
County," Carlson said. "Our com- 
mittec believes we should be plan- 
ning for an intermediate size 
center." 



Mayor Klingler suggested the 
group look into alternative sites for 
their programs, yet continue to 
offer its core programs, such as 
instruction on microcomputers. 

Carlson said "it would be diffi- 
cult to be at two different sites." 
The group would like to request 
funds from the 1989 budget. 

City Manager Mike Conduff 
mentioned the possibility of a 
block grant, in which up to 
$400,000 can be applied for. He 
suggested that the issue of addi- 
tional parking could not be resol- 
ved until the completion of the 
downtown re-development. 

The parking situation for the 
new mall was the final agenda item 
of the commissioner's session. Ed 
Mulcahy, of JBM and Associates 
in Kansas City, made recommen- 
dations for the Town Center's 
parking areas and those in the sur- 
rounding business district. 

Mulcahy 's strategy for control 
of the parking situation include: no 
parking time limits on the Town 
Center site, remove the 3 -hour lim- 
it on the public lots west of 3rd 
Street, eliminate over-night park- 
ing and place a 2-hour limit on 
Poyntz Avenue. 




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return to its normal, healthy 
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FcxxIWednesday 



Kansas State Collegian ■ Wednesday. August 26, 1987 ■ Page 8 



S+O+R+B+E+T 




SO 
COOL 



Story by Susan Staggenborg 

Photography by Andy Nelson and Steve Wolgast 



The dog days of summer arc upon us. It's 
hot, you're hot. The Good Humor man is 
nowhere in sight, and you want something 
cool and tight. 

Ice cream sounds good, hut you crave 
something lower in calorics, sugar, butter I at 
and additives — not to mention price. 

The easiest homemade alternatives to 
commercial frozen desserts are sherbets, sor- 
bets, granitas and ices. 

Sherbets and sorbets are low-calorie cou- 
sins of ice cream. Ice cream is rich with 
cream, milk and sometimes eggs, as well as 
sweeteners and flavoring. 

Sherbets, sorbets, graniias and other ices 
are water-based desserts made with fruit or 
fruit juices and sweetener, with gelatin added 
for smoothness. 

Sherbet usually contains less than 2 per- 
cent buiterfat Ice cream can have anywhere 
from 10 percent to 20 percent butierfai. 

Sherbets contain 180 calories to 270 calo- 
ries; sorbets and ices, 96 calorics to 2S0 
calories. 

Sorbet is the French word for sherbet, 
which counts as one of its few ingredients 
milk or egg white (or unflavored gelatin) to 
help coax it into a smooth, snowy texture. 

Ice or granita, the Italian ancestor of sor- 
bet, contains only coarsely mashed or pureed 
fruit or fruit juice, water and a sweetener. Ices 
arc coarser in texture than a sorbet. 

Nouvelle cuisine chefs arc said to be 
responsible for the rebirth of ices and sher- 
bets and the use of the word sorbet. 

The two have become increasingly popular 
as Americans strive for natural flavors and 
low-fat foods in their diets. 

Sorbets or sherbets are as easy to prepare 
as traditional ice cream. All that is needed is 
an ice cream maker, electric or hand-cranked, 
or a metal pan to do the freezing job. 

Follow the directions of the ice cream 
maker, and adjust the amount of salt sug- 
gested to get the desired consistency of 
sorbet. 

Sorbets are not limited to fresh fruit. When 
fresh fruits are out of season, canned varieties 
work just as well and take on a different taste 
and feel when blended into a sorbet 

A few hints for the perfect sorbet* 

Taste before freezing. If the mixture seems 
too sweet add a little lemon juice or other tart 
flavoring. If it's too tan, add more sweetener. 
(If using sugar to sweeten, be sure it is dissol- 
ved before adding.) 

The smooth, silky texture of a sorbet 
depends on slow freezing in an ice cream 
maker or on several beatings with a mixer 
while freezing. The less salt used in the ice 



cream maker, the longer the freezing lime 
and the Oner the texture of the sorbet 

The coarse texture of an ice is achieved by 
fast freezing in an ice cream maker. More salt 
in the ice cream maker will result in a faster 
freeze and a grainy, icy texture. 

For best flavor and texture, transfer sorbets 
and ices to (he refrigerator for about 30 
minutes to soften slightly before serving. 

Sorbets and ices do not keep well, and after 
a period of being frozen they tend to crystal- 
lize and lose their textures. 

Sorbets may be made without the use of an 
ice cream maker. 

Still-freezing is a technique used for a 
quick and smoother sorbet. 

Slow freezing is a technique used to pro- 
duce a smoother sorbet Placing the mixture 
into a large metal bowl and stirring and re- 
freezing will create a sorbet of the smoothest 
texture. 

Quick freezing is a method used to produce 
a coarser texture. The mixture is placed into a 
square metal pan and frozen. The mixture is 
then beaten with a mixer until light and 
foamy and returned to the freezer again. 

Sorbets are a new introduction to the low- 
calorie dessert. They are easy to prepare in 
your own kitchen and are also available at 
local supermarkets. 

To cool off or to simply satisfy a craving 
for something light and icy, look no more for 
the Good Humor man. Look for sorbets. 

VERY-STRAWBERRY SORBET 

1 envelope unflavored gelatin 
'A cup sugar 

l'/i cups water 

2 cups pureed strawberries or raspberries 
'/ cup cranberry juice cocktail 

2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice 

Small strawberries or raspberries and tiny 
mint leaves for garnish. 

Mix gelatin and sugar in a medium sauce- 
pan. Stir in water. Let stand to soften gelatin. 
Stir over low heat until gelatin is completely 
dissolved. Remove from heat and cool to 
room temperature. Stir in strawberry puree, 
cranberry juice cocktail and lemon juice. 

Pour into the canister of ice cream maker 
and freeze, following manufacturer's direc- 
tions, or still-freeze. 

Cover canister and freeze until firm. For 
longer term storage, pack in freezer contain- 
ers, allowing one-half inch head space for 
expansion. 

Transfer sorbet to the refrigerator to soften 
slightly before serving. 

YIELD: About 5 cups. 

Nutrition per one-half cup: 57 calorics; 1 




gram protein; grams fat 14 grams carbohy- 
drate; 2 milligrams sodium. 

SPARKLING LEMON-LIME 
SORBET 

1 envelope unflavored gelatin 

'/j cup sugar 

1 cup water 

1 cup ginger ale 

'/i cup fresh lemon juice, strained 

% cup fresh lime juice, strained 

Tiny lemon or lime wedges or twists for 



garnish 

Mix gelatin and sugar in a medium sauce- 
pan. Stir over low heat until gelatin is com- 
pletely dissolved. Remove from heat and 
cool to room temperature. Stir in ginger ale 
and lemon and lime juices. Pour into a 9-inch 
square metal pan. Freeze unlit firm. Spoon 
into a chilled metal bowl and beat with 
chilled beaters until tight and foamy. Return 
to Ihe freezing pan, cover, and freeze until 
firm. 

Transfer sorbet to the refrigerator before 



Gins courtesy of Kitchens Plui 

serving to soften slightly. 
YIELD: About 4 cups. 

VARIATION: For a miniy, citrus flavor, 
increase water to 2 cups and omil ginger ale. 
Alter gelatin is dissolved, add '/* cup I wisely 
packed mint leaves and simmer over low heat 
for 5 minutes; strain. Let cool to room temp- 
erature, then proceed as above. 

Nutrition per 'A cup: 67 caloncs; 1 gram 
protein; grams fat; 17 grams carbohydrate; 
I milligram sodium. 



Food for thought: Cooking needn't be dull 



Food for Thought 



Welcome to the world 
of food: A favorite sub- 
ject of many, especially 
me. 

Did you ever wonder 
about how often people 
think of food? 

We wake up every 
morning and look 
through half-empty, state 
boxes of cereal. That 
alone can be a monu- 
mental task early in the 
morning. 

Lunch rolls around and you have thought about food more than 
once already because your siomach reminds you that the stale 
Cocoa Pebbles aren't going to cut it. You look longingly at your 
tuna sandwich for lunch and decide you have to stop meeting like 
this. 

Dinner lime is another story altogether. Going out to cat or stay- 




SUSAN 
STAGGENBORG 

Features 
Editor 



ing at home will be determined by the contents of the wallet. 

Stick with me and this column could provide some hints about 
cooking that you have never heard of. You'll learn about a new 
and strange fruit that you thought the grocer looked over when 
throwing out rotten produce. 

You'll find out ways to cook wilh leftovers and learn a few tips 
lhat would put your grandmother to shame. You might even get a 
laugh out of it all. So, welcome to the strange and funny world of 
food. 

Fanners Market 

Let me introduce to you our first funny fruit from ihe farmers market. 

It's smalt, fuzzy and tastes a little like a strawberry. It's of Chinese 
descent and named after a New Zealand bird. I'm talking about the Kiwi 
fruit 

Kiwi is considered a berry and has a melon-type texture . They can be 
eaten by peeling off the fuzzy brown skin and slicing to enjoy the sweet 
and juicy fruit inside. 

Kiwi can be added wilh other fruits and arc used as an edible garnish. 



The fruit should be bought when it is ripe and firm (but not rock 
hard). It is best if you allow the kiwi lo ripen in a brown paper bag a 
few days. Then let the kiwi out of the bag and enjoy. 

Practical Pointers 

Have an cxlra chicken lying around? Zip up that chicken by rubbing 
inside and out wilh Italian salad dressing and bake uncovered in a 350 
degree oven. Turn it once then brown and remove when other side is 
brown. What a way to give chicken an Italian accent. 

Did somebody forget lo refill (he ice cube tray, or is the ice maker 
broken? Need those extra "cubes" to cool your drink? Try filling empty 
foam egg trays wilh waicr and freezing for extra ice cubes in a pinch. 

#•* 

Another idea for those of you who like to bake. Dragging out the 
flour and attempting to "dusi" ihe inside of the pans before baking, try 
dusting with granulated sugar. Your cakes and breads will no longer 
need a slick of dynamite lo get ihcm out of the pans. The sugar will also 
give your cakes a light sugary glaze. 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, W«dnetdiy, AuguH M, 1987 



Campus Briefly 



Scholarship funds established 

A scholarship has been established to assist members of K-State's 

golf team. 

The Milton L. David Memorial Golf Scholarship will be awarded 
annually to a recipient recommended by the athletic department. 
Friends and family of David have donated more than $10,000 to 
permanently endow the fund. 

David was president, chairman of the board and chief executive 
officer of Development Planning and Research Associates in Man- 
hattan. He was an avid golfer and a member of K-State's Presidents 

Club. . , 

The Eugene A. Fricdmann Development Fund honors the long- 
time K-State professor who served as head of the Department of 
Sociology. Anthropology and Social Work for 20 years. The fund 
was created by friends, alumni and colleagues and will provide sup- 
port for colloquiums and other departmental purposes. 

Fricdmann is recognized as a scholar in the area of social geron- 
tology and is widely known for his work on retirement issues. 

Nuclear Society gives awards 

The American Nuclear Society has awarded scholarships to two 

K -State students. 

Jess Gehin, senior in nuckar engineering, and Robert Rcicnenbcr- 
ger, junior in nuclear engineering, were each awarded $2,000 by the 
Society. They are among 10 recipients nationwide to receive the 

awards. 

Criteria for selection was based on written essays, academic cre- 
dentials and involvement in extracurricular activities. 

K-State graduate honored 

A doctoral graduate in physics from K-State has been awarded 
the highest honor the Board of Curators in the University of Mis- 
souri system can bestow on a faculty member. 

Marvin R. Qucrry was named as a Curators' Professor at the Uni- 
versity of Missouri, Kansas City. He was selected because of his 
national and international reputation for physics research, scholar- 
ship and creative activity. 

"He (Querry) worked on his Ph.D. dissertation with K.SU 
Regents' professor Dudley Williams," said Chander Bhalla, head of 
the physics department. "Qucrry has given colloquium talks in the 
department and has encouraged good students to come to Kansas 
State University." 

Freshmen get scholarships 

Four K-State freshmen are among 15 Kansas college students 
receiving full academic scholarships this year through the Congres- 
sional Teacher Scholarship Program. 

The federally funded $5,000 awards arc for students pursuing 
teaching careers at the preschool, elementary and secondary levels. 
Recipients are eligible for the annual award for up to four years. 

K-State recipients are Thomas B. DeStasio Jr., Cimarron; Christo- 
pher S. Kemp, Pretty Prairie; Bradley Piroutek, Smith Center; and 
Kirk S. Schuler, Norton vilie. 



Two arraigned in murders 



By The Associated Press 



WELCH. Okla. — The teen-age 
son and daughter of a Welch rancher 
were arraigned Tuesday on three 
counts of first-degree murder in the 
slayings of their father, stepmother 
and infant half sister. 

Prosecutors and investigators said 
the three family members were killed 
after church Sunday, apparently fol- 
lowing a family argument. 

Investigators found the bodies of 
Kenneth Clmton Wingficld. 43, his 
wife, Louise, 36, and their daughter. 
Crete, 18 months, in a trash dump 
near their rural home near the Kansas 
border in northeastern Oklahoma 
about 7:30 a.m. Monday, said Craig 
County Sheriff Jess Walker. 

Ty Dclbert Wingficld, 19, and his 
16-ycar-old sister. Holly Wingfield, 
were charged as adults Monday in 
Craig County Distric t Court in V iniia 
with three counts of first-degree 
murder. 

Wingficld was being held in the 
Craig County Jail while his sister was 
being held in a juvenile facility in 
Clarcmorc after they were relumed 
from Texas, said Assistant District 



Attorney David Poplin. 

The teen-agers were arraigned 
Tuesday afternoon before District 
Judge Jess Clanton, who scheduled 
an Oct. 5 preliminary hearing. 

Ty and Holly Wingficld' s mother 
and Clint Wingficld were divorced 
about eight years ago, relatives said. 
Their mother, Judy Wingficld Blcw- 
ilt, died at her home in Idabcl of an 
apparent drug overdose on Dec. 30, 
1983, officials said. 

Albert Hunt of Strawberry, Ariz., 
Louise Wingficld's brother, and 
Tom Kincannon of Pay son, Ariz., the 
elder Wingficld's cdusin, said Ty 
Wingficld had problems with drugs 
in the past. 

Kincannon said Clint Wingficld 
called his own father in Arizona on 
Friday and told him he had found 
drug paraphernalia in the barn on the 
360-acre farm they had purchased 
about a year ago. 

The couple and their young 
daughter, members of the Church of 
Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Sainu, 
commonly known as the Mormons, 
had returned home from church 
shortfy before the killings, officials 
said. 



The older children lived with the 
family but did not attend church reg- 
ularly. Ty Wingficld had recently 
been discharged from the armed ser- 
vices because of a bad back and was 
to attend Northeastern Oklahoma 
A&M College in nearby Miami, 

Harrison County, Texas, Sheriff 
Bill Oldham said Ty Wingfield was 
located after the parents of his former 



girlfriend called authorities and said 
he had driven to their Halls villc, Tex- 
as, residence and told them about the 
killings. 

Oldham said Hotly Wingficld 
apparently drove alone to Marshall, 
Texas, about 40 miles west of 
Shrcvcport, La., in another vehicle. 
He said she was arrested Monday 
afternoon. 




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10 KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, W»dn«»o»y, «»¥»»' ". ■—' 

Branded beef attractive for new diets 



By Stoff and Wif» Reports 

Beef programs have joined the 
competition 10 calch the consumer's 
attention by adding brand name beef 
products to grocery stores' meal 
departments. 

Branded beef is a retail cut pro- 
duced by a packing house that puts its 
company name on the package. 
Similar to brand name programs for 
poultry and pork, branded beef is an 
attempt to guarantee consistency and 
quality to customers who buy the 
product. Most stores already carry 
brand name pork and poultry. 

The program is not new, said Dell 
Allen, professor of animal sciences 
and industry. Rather, similar items 
were in production from the 
mid- 1920s to the 1950s. The prog- 
rams surfaced again in 1978 when 
the Certified Angus Beef Program 
started using branded beef products 
as a "breed identity," he said. 

Allen said the different target 
groups of consumers, those who 
wanted "lite" beef products and those 
who wanted easy convenience pro- 
ducts, prompted the program's 
return. 

The Wichita-based Excel Corp. is 
one of the most successful packing 




Uluslruion by Brell Hacker 

Branded beef products may be trying to gel their beef too lean ii they 
are aiming at the diet-conscious segment of consumers, according to 
Dell Allen, professor of animal sciences and industry. Palatability can 
be adversely affected beyond a certain point. 



plants to use the branded beef prog- 
rams. Allen said. The Excel packing 
plant produces items for the consum- 
er who wants both high quality beef 
products and convenience, he said. 
Sales of the branded products are 
fair, said Butch Buchenau, meal 
department manager of the Dillon's 



store, 632 Tuttle Creek Blvd. 

"It's a new process that's been tak- 
ing lime," he said. "It has a different 
appearance. I'd say 95 percent of the 
people who have tried it have been 
satisfied." 

Buchenau said the Dillon's store 
has been selling branded beef pro- 



ducts since last March. The boneless 
cut is shipped from Excel in a 
vacumm- scaled package and sells for 
about the same price as regular meat. 
Guaranteed for seven days in the 
refrigerator, the meat docs not need 
freezing. 



"It's a new process that's 
been taking time," he 
said, "it has a different 
appearance. I'd say 95 
percent of the people 
who have tried It have 
been satisfied." 

—Butch Buchenau 



In the Dillon's store located at 
2700 Anderson, Bill Hale, meal 
department employee, said a lot of 
the branded beef items had to he cut 
back because of the lack of demand 
for the products. 

"The filleLs sell good, but the other 
items arc slow movers," Hale said. 
Coupon incentives arc used to help 



sell the products. 

Contrary to Buchenau, Hale said 
the price per pound is higher and the 
coloring is "not as good as cuts made 
in the store," 

Producers of branded beef may try 
to get their beef loo lean if they arc 
aiming at the diet-conscious segment 
of consumers, Allen said, though the 
Certified Angus Beef Program tries 
to maximize the marbling degree. 

Marbling refers to the even distri- 
bution of fat necks or streaks in mcaL 
affecting juiciness, flavor and ten- 



derness, said Michael Dikcman, pro- 
fessor of animal sciences and 
industry. 

Beyond the threshold for mar- 
bling, palatability is adversely 
affected, said Dikcman. 

"There are some branded beef 
programs that are pushing that 
threshold," he said. "There are some 
that are even below iL" 

One of the reasons marbling is 
important is as a safeguard against 
comsumcrs who overcook or impro- 
perly cook beef, Dikcman said. 



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PHI KAPPA TAW 
LITTLE SISTEZ 

The men of Phi Kappa Tau 

cordially invite 
the Women of K-State 
to a 
little sister rush party 
to be held at our house 

at 1606 Fairchild 
on Thursday, August 27 
at 8 p.m. 
for questions, escorts, or rides 
call S33-74IB 



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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, W«in«td»y, Augu»l 26, 1867 



11 



Hayden strikes back at highway 

Governor nears end 
of statewide visits 



foes 



By The Associated Press 



ARKANSAS CITY —Gov. Mike 
Hayden struck back al oil marketers 
and truckers who oppose his com- 
prehensive highway plan Tuesday as 
his 22-city tour of the state ncarcd its 
end. 

Hayden got a warm welcome in 
Arkansas City, on the next-to-last leg 
of his tour, but he was met by a small 
group of chanting protesters in Win- 
ficld, his first slop of the day. He 
traveled to Winficld, then to Arkan- 
sas City, Sedan and lola. 

Acknowlcging some truckers and 
oil marketers who don't like motor 
fuels tax increases he has proposed to 
pay for a highway program arc 



"speaking from the pockctbook," 
Hayden said his approach still is the 
fairest way to finance new road 
construction. 

Hayden justified proposed 
increases in truck registration fees in 
his plan by saying, "Wear and tear on 
our roads is caused primarily by the 
weight of the vehicle." 

In Arkansas City, Hayden spoke to 
a friendly crowd of about 1 50 people, 
mostly businessmen. The crowd was 
about the same size in Winfield, but it 
included about a dozen women and 
children who held banners protesting 
his plan and chanted, "Budget your 
money; wc budget ours," and "We 
need our future." 

Hayden will make four more stops 



this week to finish the tour. He goes 
Thursday to Colby and Junction City 
and Friday to Concordia and Salina. 

Hayden was accompanied Tues- 
day by Secretary of Transportation 
Horace Edwards and the chairman of 
the two legislative budget commit- 
tees. Sen. Gus Bogina, R-Lenexa, 
and Rep. Bill Buntcn, R-Topeka. 
U.S. Rep, Bob Whittaker, who repre- 
sents 25 counties in southeast and 
southccntral Kansas, also showed up. 

Hayden has called a special ses- 



sion of the Legislature for Monday to 
have lawmakers consider his plan. 

Under the proposal, the stale 
Department of Transportation would 
spend $1 .7 1 billion on new construc- 
tion and $5.58 billion overall on all of 
its operations over nine years. 

The stale's gasoline and diesei tax- 
es would increase by five cents a gal- 
lon and its vehicle registration fees 
by between 50 percent and 100 pcr- 
cenL The stale also would issue 
almost SI. 3 billion in bonds, and the 



motor fuels taxes and vehicle 
registration fees would be adjusted 
annually for inflation. 

In Winfield, Sandra Peters, of 
Oxford, told Hayden she thinks the 
program will create a heavy burden 
for taxpayers. 

'To me, it's economic suicide," 
Peters said. "Why build new high- 
ways that will have to be repaired and 
repaired and repaired?" 

However, Hayden and Edwards 
said the state needs ihc plan if it is to 
keep up with its maintenance needs. 
Edwards said the state Department of 
Transportation will need about $400 
million over the next nine years just 
to finance its current programs. 

Hayden also said he could not sell 



his program to the full Legislature if 
it did not have unified support in 
southeast Kansas, which would 
receive several major road improve- 
ment projects. Whiitakcr said south- 
cast Kansas lawmakers who didn't 
support ihc plan were "traitors." 

Hayden said, "How can I sell this 
to a guy from Brewster or a guy from 
Phillipsburg if a legislator from 
southeast Kansas won't even vote for 
iL" 

Hayden was about an hour late to 
the Winficld meeting because his 
plane was diverted to Wichita 
because of a landing gear problem. It 
landed without incident in Wichita, 
and he was driven to Winficld. 



Wichita's mayor 
takes new post 



r 



llHMM Ifit's tradition you wans, 
we re your store. 
\Pear 




By The Associated Press 

WICHITA — Mayor Bob Knighi 
has been hired as development direc- 
tor of the Wesley Foundation, one of 
the nation's 10 largest health care 
foundations. 

Knight, 47, will direct the organi- 
zation's fund raising, coordinate 
foundation volunteers and direct 
other projects, foundation president 
Duane Dyer said Monday. He is 
scheduled to start his new job SepL 1. 

Knight said he took the job 
because he thought it would allow 
him the flexibility to accomplish his 
administrative and ceremonial may- 
oral tasks along with working full 



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time for the foundation. 

In May, Knight and First Securi- 
ties Co. of Kansas said they had 
agreed to allow him to take an indefi- 
nite, unpaid leave of absence from 
his investment banker's job. 

First Securities President Ray 
Reed said demands of both jobs 
made it difficult for Knight to con- 
tinue in both his banking and mayor- 
al positions and that the situation 
wasn't fair to the city or to First 
Securities. 

Knight is paid $12,500 a year as 
mayor, a part-time position that sev- 
eral former mayors say has expanded 
in scope to require 45 to 60 hours 
each week. 



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ELIGIBILITY FOR CARE 

AT 

LAFENE STUDENT 

HEALTH CENTER 



1 . Health tees are established upon the recommendation of the 
Student Senate with approval by the Board of Regents. 

2. All students who are enrolled and attending classes during a 
regular semester or summer session who have paid health fees 
are eligible for care. 

3. Those enrolled in Special Courses, for varying periods of time, 
who have made previous arrangements for health care 
coverage at Lafene are eligible for care. (Lists of these students 
must be furnished prior to being seen at Lafene.) 
Only students, who have paid the health fee, may elect to have 
their spouse also covered at Lafene; however, they must pay 
the spouse fee within 10 days of the time their own health fees 
are paid. (Children cannot be seen.) 
Emergency care, prior to referral, will be given anyone who 
comes in. 

Students enrolled m 6 hours or less, electing not to pay the 
health fee during the Fall or Spring semesters, who wish to be 
seen, will be charged $20 for each office visit. This charge 
continues until the full health fee has been exceeded, then that 
student will be afforded the same privileges as the regular fee 
paying student for the remainder of that semester. 
Students who were enrolled in the Spring and pre-enrolled for 
the Fall semester but not attending summer school may pay $15 
and be eligible tor care during the summer, This fee may be 
paid within 30 days prior to summer registration and ends the 
day classes begin A late fee of $20 will be accepted for the 
remainder of the summer 

8 Health fees are good until 12 o'clock the night the next semester 
begins. 



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charges for certain supplies and services and the charges 
are subject to change without prior notice. 

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12 KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN. W.diwMliy. Augmt 26, 1987 



Pilots association asks Dole to step down 



Request called ludicrous 



By The Associated Pr»$s 

LOS ANGELES — The nation's 
largest pilots association called 
Tuesday for the resignation of Trans- 
portation Secretary Elizabeth Dole in 
the wake of increasingly stringent 
federal air safety standards. 

"Hers has been a failed admi- 
nistration from start to finish," said 



John Baker, president of the 
260,000- member Aircraft Owners 
and Pilots Association. "We believe 
she was not qualified when 
appointed and she surely hasn't 
grown in the job." 

A letter- writing campaign against 
Dole is planned and the group was to 
place an advertisement in USA 
Today this week calling for her to 



step down, said Baker, a former 
deputy administrator of the FA A. 

"We're going to use what political 
muscle we can muster and turn up the 
heat on Washington and the White 
House," he said. 

Department of Transportation 
spokesman Bob Marx called the alle- 
gations "ludicrous ... without any 
basis in facL particularly when you 



consider the fact that Secretary Dole 
has made safety her top priority from 
the day she walked into the job." 

The Federal Aviation Administra- 
tion, an arm of the department, 
heightened restrictions on small 
planes flying near Los Angeles Inter- 
national Airport after an Aug. 11 
near-collision between an American 
Airlines jet and a private plane. 

The pilots' group is seeking an 
injunction against the FAA's deci- 
sion to expand the Terminal Control 
Area around the airport, and the case 



is scheduled to come before an appel- 
late court in October, Baker said. 

The department plans to expand or 
impose TCAs in major airports 
across the nation as part of a program 
to improve safely. 

Newly appointed FAA Admini- 
strator T. Allan McArtor imple- 
mented the Los Angeles change. The 
association contends that the change 
will reduce air safety through 
increased congestion and a heavier 
workload for air traffic controllers. 

Baker also attacked McArtor as 



"someone with no civil aviation 
background who has been in town 
three weeks and is announcing solu- 
tions to all our problems." 

The FAA had no comment, said 
agency spokesman Bob Buckhorn in 
Washington. 



±~. March of 
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Sports 

Kansas State Collegian ■ Wednesday, August 26. 1987 ■ Page 13 



'Cat tailback 'hanging in there' 



By Tom Morris 
Sports Writer 



Tony Jordan, K-Staie's record- 
setting tailback, in his own words is 
"just hanging in there." 

That's not "just hanging in there" 
as in barely making the team. It's 
"hanging in there" as in watting for 
some good luck and breaks to come 
his way. And as the Wildcat football 
coaching staff sees it, waiting for the 
respect and recognition he so largely 
deserves. 

One example of how Jordan' s luck 
has been running came during last 
year's game against Iowa State at 
Ames. The 6-fool-3, 220-pound 
senior from Rochester, N.Y.. set a K- 
State record with 218 yards on 25 
carries. Jordan's efforts eclipsed the 
old mark of 200 yards set in 1979 by 
LJ. Brown against Air Force. 

But Jordan's performance — 
which came in a 48-19 losing effort 
to the Cyclones — was overlooked 
by the Big Eight Conference. Offen- 
sive player-of-the-weck honors 
instead went to Oklahoma quarter- 
back Jamclle Hollieway for his 
efforts in a win against Colorado. 

The latest example of Jordan's 
luck — or lack thereof — came on 
his recent journey from his home- 
town to Manhattan for the start of 
football practices. A 1,300-miIc trip 
that normally takes 24-25 hours took 
Jordan 3'/i days. The trip included 
three car breakdowns and cost Jordan 
about $250 in repair bills. 

Jordan had just gotten his car, a 
1977 Cadillac given to him by his 
uncle, out of the repair shop where 
the engine and transmission had been 
replaced. 

"I got about four hours away from 
home and the back end went out on 
me. My uncle works on cars... he 
drove down and fixed what was 
wrong, so there was no problem there 
'cause it was kind of close to home," 
Jordan said. 

"Then I got as far as Paineville 
(Ohio), which is right before Cleve- 
land, and it broke down again," he 
added. "At first, the guy at the gas 
station couldn't really Figure out 
what was wrong with it. Then later on 
in the day they found out it was the 
fuel pump." 

Jordan had to get the fuel pump, 
which added to his problems because 




K-State running back Tony Jordan's Cadillac broke down three times 
on the way to Manhattan and has been the source of much pre-season 



Sufr/Andy Net ion 

discussion. Jordan said the hoopla doesn't concern him because he 
believes in hard work and is unconcerned about personal publicity. 



he had to drive the car to gel it. None 
of the dealerships in the area had the 
part for his auto, so Jordan ended up 
going to a junkyard. 

"They had the part, and I look it 
back to the place where they detected 
the problem, and ihey put it on for me 
and it didn't work. It was a faulty 
part. So we called another place, they 
had the part and they put it on." 

Jordan was once again on his way 
and made it as far as Lawrence, when 
lightning — in the form of car trouble 
— struck again. This lime the muffler 
fell off. To add to the situation, it was 
raining hard. 

But just as running backs often 
improvise when carrying the ball, 



Jordan managed to fix the faulty 
muffler. 

"I took some hangers from my 
clothes, wired il up and made it to 
Manhattan, finally," Jordan said. 

Luckily, Jordan didn't run into any 
fly-by-night gas station attendants 
during his trek to Manhattan, As a 
matter of fact, Jordan said the man in 
Ohk> who tried all day to get Jordan's 
car operating only charged him $10 
for his lime and effort. 

Jordan has been the subject of 
much preseason hoopla concerning 
the Wildcat football team, but the 
fifth-year senior is not bothered by 
the media attention. 

"I don't mind. I'm not worrying 



about all (the recognition)." Jordan 
said. "I'm not one who wants to be in 
the paper or be the front-runner and 
all that. It's cool. What I get I appre- 
ciate; what I don't, it's no big deal." 

One person who has recognized 
Jordan's value is Coach Stan Parrish. 
After Jordan ranked fifth in the Big 
Eight in rushing and led the 'Cats 
with 738 yards on J02 carries last 
season, Parrish grounded "Air Par- 
rish" this year in favor of the running 
game. 

'That made me feel good. That's 
something you've got to be proud of, 
for someone to say, 'Hey, this guy is 
good enough. We can put the ball in 
his hands and let him run with it.' It 



gave me a sense of pride." Jordan 
said. 

Jordan will be counted on tre- 
mendously as the Wildcats plan to 
favor the ground attack in 1987. But 
until the fourth game of last year 
when Jordan gained 115 yards 
against Texas Christian, he was just 
another name and number. 

After TCU, Jordan's patient alti- 
tude was finally rewarded by being 
allowed to start in the last seven 
games. 

"Coaches have a hard job deciding 
what to do and who to play. I'm not 
complaining or anything," Jordan 
said. 

"I just hung in there." 



Big Eight 
team wins 
over China 

By The Collegian Staff 

Plagued no longer by poor 
shooting and numerous tur- 
novers, the Big Eighi Confer- 
ence select basketball team has 
a shot at winning the gold. 

Led by ihc overall play of K- 
State forward Charles Bledsoe, 
the Big Eight team defeated the 
Liaoning Province learn from 
China, 101-81, Tuesday morn- 
ing in the Beijing (China) 
International Tournament. 

Bledsoe scored a team -high 
25 points on 12 of 1 3 shooting 
from the field plus one free 
throw, while adding eight 
rebounds to lead the select 
squad to its third victory in four 
games in the loumcy. 

Joining Bledsoe in double- 
figure scoring was Iowa 
State's Gary Thompkins with 
18 points and Colorado's Scotl 
Wilke with 15 points. The 
team shot 62 percent from the 
field. 

Bledsoe, in the Big Eight's 
bst game against Malaysia 
scored only six points, but 
went three- for-ihrce from the 
field. 

With its 3-1 tournament 
record and by way of the Czc- 
choslovakian team defeating 
Poland, the Big Eight team 
claimed top honors in its pool 
of teams. 

The select team will now 
play the China national team at 
3:30 a.m. Thursday (CDT). 

If the select squad wins that 
contest, it will advance to play 
the Soviet Union for the gold 
medal in the tournament. 

Rounding out the scoring for 
the team were Oklahoma 
State's Royce Jeffries with 
nine points, Missouri's Mike 
Sandbolhc also with nine, 
Kansas' Mark Randall wilh 
eight, K-State's Steve Hcnson 
with six, Kansas* Archie Mar- 
shall with six and Colorado's 
Keith Lee with five. 

Nebraska's 6-foot-7 redshirt 
freshman Beau Reed did not 
score. 



Parrish changes 
for team's sake 



"We'll be throwing the ball get- 
ting off the bus." — Stan Parrish, 
1986. 

"Although it hurts me to do it, 
Atr Parrish is somewhat 
grounded." — Stan Parrish, 1987. 

After a frustration-filled 2-9 sea- 
son where K-State was outscored by 
its opponents by over a 3-1 ratio. Par- 
rish has decided a change of strategy 
is in line. Air Parrish is temporarily 
out of orbit. 

This year's K-State team will be 
(»ie built around the running game, 
particularly the talents of tailback 
Tony Jordan. Parrish has made it 
clear he believes Jordan is the main 
strength of the team and won't hesi- 
tate to hand the ball to the 6-fool-3, 
220-pound tailback 20-25 times per 
game. 

"He's bigger, stronger, faster and 
more competitive than last year," 
Parrish said of Jordan, who gained 
738 yards on 202 carries last year. "A 
lot of people, particularly the pros, 
are interested in watching him." 

Taking a look at the talent on the 
K-State rosier, the switch in empha- 
sis appears to be a good one. Parrish 
has taken a hard look at the talent on 
his football team, swallowed his 
pride a bit and made the changes he 
believes are necessary to give the 
Wildcats a chance in the powerful 
Big Eight Conference. 

"Although it's not what we would 
like to do, that's what being a coach 
is," Parrish said. "You can go down 
ihc drain trying something that's not 
going to work." 

The supposed wide-open passing 
attack certainly didn't work for K- 
State last year. The Wildcais 
exceeded 200 yards in passing 
offense only once last year — in the 
41-7 loss at Texas Tech. 

A strong proponent of the passing 
game, ii wasn't easy for Parrish to 
switch. But Parrish did change and 
deserves credit for doing it. 



Mid-week Commentary 




»'* 1 


TOM 
PERRIN 


i»»> M 






^^L .^^k 


Sports 
Columnist 



With the offense sputtering, the K- 
Siate defense paid the price in the 
Missouri game, spending too much 
time on the field and losing stamina 
late in the game. 

After thai game, Parrish said he 
started making the gradual shift to 
the running game. Throughout the 
final four games of 1986, the change 
was underway. Jordan was gcuing 
increasingly more carries, including 
35 for 218 yards (a school record) in 
a 48-19 loss at Iowa State. 

Now, after the completion of 
spring drills and through nearly three 
weeks of pre-season practice, the 
new plan is well -entrenched. K- Stale 
has been transformed into a run- 
oriented football team. 

But don't get the idea that the pass- 
ing game has been assigned a perma- 
nent place in the scrap heap. Parrish 
still believes in the pass and projects 
K-State will throw around 20 times 
per game this year. 

To take advantage of K-State's 
quickness on the offensive line and 
mask the lack of size and inexperi- 
ence, Parrish intends to use more 
play-action passes rather than drop- 
ping back. 

All things considered, it looks like 
Parrish and the coaching staff have 
made plenty of positive changes that 
will help bring K-State back 10 
respectability. Just how close to 
respectability the Wildcats can be 
remains to be seen. 



Pre-season 'Husker controversy 



Thomas equipped 
with 'short fuse' 



By The Associated Press 

LINCOLN. Neb. - Brodcrick 
Thomas knows he shouldn't have 
resisted police officers who look 
him in for failure to pay a fine. Uni- 
versity of Nebraska football Coach 
Tom Osborne said Tuesday. 

"He's an emotional guy," Osbor- 
ne said of the outspoken defensive 
end. 

"Brodcrick *s not a bad person 
but he's got a short fuse," Osborne 
said. "He's got a lot of pride." 

"He obviously should have gone 
along (with ploice)," Osborne said. 
"I've told him that, and he knows 
thai." 



"Broderick's not a bad 
person, but he's got a 
short fuse." 

— Tom Osborne 



Thomas was booked into Lan- 
caster County Jail on two counts of 
resisting arrest Monday evening 
after a struggle with four officers at 
his apartment and five officers ai 
the jail, police said. 

Osborne said he would have to 
gel more details as ihc case deve- 
lops before deciding whether any 
disciplinary actum against Thomas 
is in order. Meanwhile, Thomas 
will practice wilh the team, Osbor- 
ne said. 

Osborne said he wouldn't 
second-guess police handling Of the 
situation. He said there is a percep- 
tion that an athlete "can get away 
wilh murder," and he is sometimes 
concerned about "reverse discrimi- 
nauon" that may .hold athletes to a 
more severe standard that other 



young people. 

Two police officers went to Tho- 
mas' apartment ai Monday around 

9 p.m. to arrest him on a county 
bench warrant for failure to comply 
with a court order to pay a fine for 
violating a traffic signal. 

Thomas told the officers he had 
just paid several fines and had pay- 
ment receipts in his car, said Ll. 
Lylc Roberts. The officers checked 
the receipts but they did not pertain 
to the warrant the officers were 
serving, Roberts said. Thomas still 
refused lo go with the officers and 
two additional officers were called 

10 the scene, Roberts said. 
Osborne said Thomas told him 

he offered to drive his own car 
downtown and pay the fine, but he 
refused to accompany the officers. 

After a struggle with the four 
officers, Thomas was handcuffed, 
put in leg restraints and taken to jail, 
Roberts said. 

Osborne said Thomas should 
have complied without resistance. 

At the jail, Thomas was put in a 
holding room, where all suspects 
are placed before being booked into 
jail, and the handcuffs and leg 
restraints were taken off. After 
about an hour, authorities let him 
out to make a phone call. Roberts 
said. 

Thomas tried to make a call but 
apparently could not get through. 
He men sat in a chair, became upset 
and started kicking the chairs, 
Roberts said. Three correctional 
officers and two police officers 
struggled with him and put him 
back in the holding cell, Roberts 
said. 

Osborne said Thomas had been 
pulled from practice recently and 
sent to pay some past due fines. 



Attorney's passes 
not Big 8 violation 



By Th e Associated Press 

LINCOLN. Neb. — There were 
no violations of NCAA or Big 
Eight Conference rules when 
attorney-agent Art Wilkinson was 
on the sidelines at Nebraska foot- 
ball games, Coach Tom Osborne 
told reporters Tuesday. 

Responding to recent news 
accounts centering on Wilkinson's 
activities, Osborne said he never 
knew that Wilkinson was on the 
sidelines, doesn't approve of his 
having been there and has since told 
him so. 

"I think Art assumed a few 
things. He got a little bit pushy," 
Osborne said. 

Osborne said he had checked 
NCAA and Big Eight rules and was 
confident there had been no 
violations. 

"Having someone like Art on ihe 
sidcl ine is not a violation of NCAA 
rules. It's not a violation of Big 
Eight rules," Osborne said. 

He said there wouldn't have been 
a violation if Wilkinson, as alleged, 
had talked with NU running back 
Doug DuBose on the sidelines. A 
violation attaches when a player 
signs with an agent to represent 
him. Osborne said he urges agents 
noi lo contact players until after the 
regular season. 

Osborne said he talked Tuesday 
to Wilkinson, a Philadelphia attor- 
ney and sports agent, and told him 
he didn't want him on the sidelines 
at future Nebraska games. He said 
Wilkinson told him he had been on 
the sidelines for one Comhuskcr 
game in 1985 and for three in 1986. 
using two sideline passes and two 
press passes. 

Osborne said Wilkinson told him 



a photographer gave him a press 
pass and an assistant coach gave 
him a sideline pass. Osborne said 
Wilkinson told him he didn't recall 
who gave him die other passes. 
Mike Earle, assistant director of 
NCAA publicity, said allocation of 
sideline passes and control of peo- 
ple on sidelines are decision for the 
host school. 



"I think Art assumed a 
few things. He got a little 
bit pushy." 

— Tom Osborne 



Wilkinson had struck him as an 
honest agent and a good person, 
Osborne said, but Wilkinson was 
never given any special status or 
recommendations with players. 

"I've never told a player, 'You 
ought to sign with An Wilkinson,'" 
Osborne said. 

Of 40 Nebraska players drafted 
in the last five years, Osborne said, 
Wilkinson represents ex- 
Comhuskers Mike Rozicr, Tom 
Rathman and Brian Davis, and also 
has worked with Shane Swanson 
and Tony Holloway. 

Wilkinson said the initial story 
on his activities resulted from the 
jealousy of other agents over his 
success in recruiting players. 

He said Wilkinson had never 
been his personal agent in any con- 
text, although Wilkinson was pre- 
sent when Osborne met with rep- 
resentatives of the Houston Oilers 
in late 1985 to discuss a possible 
$600,000 offer to coach the pro 
team. Wilkinson also was a consul- 
tant to NU during an investigation 
last year by the NCAA. 



nm 



* , ti ^ m t m* 



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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN. Wednetdiy. Auowl M. 1»>7 



14 KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, w.dr».«diy. Auauw a,i»" 

300 Titanic artifacts to go on display 

...... .u_«.._ : i-:_ imi o« f ,tfl m /. n i 1 08 s hu a 1 1 S -French exncdition led OcL 28. The program will 



By Wm Associated Press 

NEW YORK — The more lhari 
300 objects recovered this summer 
from the wreck of the Titanic will be 
neither sold nor held privately, but 
displayed around the world, organiz- 
ers of an international expedition 
said Tuesday. 

"We have a lot of respect for the 
people who died" on the luxury liner, 
said Robert Chappaz of France, an 
expedition organizer. "Titanic was a 



kind of link between Europe and the 
United States, and it's part of our 
common history. It belongs to the 
people of the world." 

Artifacts also will be shown on a 
television special this fall, expedition 
officials said at a news conference. 

Under the terms of the expedi- 
tion's covenant, objects recovered 
"may never be sold," said Robert Sla- 
vitt, the expedition's lawyer. "No 
way, no lime, no place, no how." 

The expedition's investors will 



receive proceeds from the television 
program and sales of tickets to view 
the collection. Ticket prices would 
be such that "a family of six will be 
able lo afford it," said George Tul- 
loch, another organizer. 

Following a world lour, the Titan- 
ic collection will be placed in a 
museum or other institution for long- 
term display, they said. 

Despite criticism lhat the expedi- 
tion was desecrating the resting place 
of the 1,513 people who died when 



the Titanic sank in 1912. a statement 
released by the expedition said the 
exhibit would be "a lasting, respect- 
ful memorial." 

Earlier this month the Senate 
passed a resolution barring the sale or 
display- for-profit of Titanic artifacts. 
Although Slavill questioned the 
vote's significance, Tulloch said the 
collection would be displayed in the 
United Slates on a non-profit basis, if 
necessary. 

The Titanic was first located in 



1985 by a U.S.-French expedition led 
by Robert Ballard, a senior scientist 
at the Woods Hole Oceanographic 
Institution in Massachusetts. He later 
used a small submarine, Alvin II, and 
a small camera -carrying robot sub, 
Jason Jr., to explore the wreck, and 
his film became a National Geo- 
graphic television special on cable 
station WTBS. 

The latest expedition also will be 
the subject of a television program, a 
f wo-hour live special to be broadcast 



Ocl 28. The program will be nar- 
rated by actor Telly Savalas and fea- 
ture the opening of a small purser's 
safe. 

Objects recovered thus far from 
the debris scattered around the wreck 
include 160 dishes, four bottles, 
seven pieces of furniture, a propeller, 
a chandelier, a bronze cherub that 
once held a light on one of the ship's 
grand staircases and a leather satchel 
containing jewels, bank notes and 
coins. 



Credit card use influences credit rating 



By Janet Swansea 

AQri/Buslness Editor 

Charge it. 

Being able to say those two simple 
words is a convenience for some and 
a pitfall for others. And for students, 
credit cards often are perceived as the 
gateway to economic freedom. 

But students should be fully aware 
of what they're gelling into, a cam- 
pus official advises. 

"About one-third to one-half of the 
people who have cards use them for 
convenience, and that's great if you 
pay the balance in full at the end of 



the month," said Sue Jenkins, assis- 
tant director of the Center for Eco- 
nomic Education. 

The one-half to two-thirds who 
fail to make their monthly payments 
lose all the benefits the cards offer, 
she said. 

"If you just use it as a convenience, 
it's like a free loan for 30 days. The 
monthly statements can also provide 
a system of record keeping, and the 
cards can establish a credit rating," 
said Jenkins. 

Credit ratings are important to cre- 
ate, but she said students should be 
sure to create a favorable one. 



"Credit ratings are not only based 
on payment history, but (on) income 
as well," said Jenkins. "They are a 
good idea, but could be dangerous 
and detrimental to the student's cre- 
dit ranking." 

While two out of three families 
have a non-mortgage debt averaging 
$5,000, one-half of all credit card 
accounts are more than 30 days over- 
due. 

Annual percentage rate, annual fee 
and grace period are three criteria to 
consider when choosing from the 
15,000 credit cards offered, she said. 

The annual percentage rate is the 



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A WEEK. AT 

KANSAS STATE 




A, 12:01 m, on » Surxtoy mnrn.ng in October 1986 ■ «"«■ *■«; *- 
clicked Wh« happened during the nem 192 hours was called AWAKS (A wee* 
al Kansas State) . . 

Former Kansas State University photographers were given the opportunity 10 
mum to campus 10 make pictures of college life in the '80s as 11 Misled for one 

week during October. 

Kansas State has numerous alumni photographers in positions ot prominence 
throughout the country. Some 30 alumni and nearly IS current student 
photographers made up the AWAKS shooung team. The resultof exposing 1 .900 
rolls of black-and-white and color film with more than 68.000 exposures is a 
10-by- 14-inch coffee-table book lo be published in September 1987. You can 
relive the experience of attending college in the 1980s at the nation I Ml 
land-grand institution through the pages of this special edition. 



See ordering information below 




A WEEK- AT 

JJANSAS STATE 



Please send me , copies of A Week At 

Kansas Slate at $25.00 each, plus $2.50 shipping 
and handling. Kansas residents must add $1.51 
for sales tax ($29.01 for Kansas residents, 
including shipping; $27.50, including shipping 
for non-residents). Make checks payable to: 
Student Publications Inc., AWAKS Book 
Orders, Kedzie Hall 103, Kansas State Univer- 
sity, Manhattan, KS 66506. For more informa- 
tion, please write or call (913) 532-6555 between 
8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. 

©Student Publications Inc., 1987 
ISBN Number is 0-943 101 -00-X. 

Send to: 



Gift copies. Please mail 
persons indicated below: 



AWAKS books to 



Name, 



Mailing Address. 
City 



State. 



_Zip- 



Name. 



Mailing Address. 



City 



State. 



-Zip. 



Name. 



Name. 



Mailing Address, 
City 



Siaic. 



.Zip- 



Mailing Address. 
City 



State. 



-Zip- 



interest rate charged on purchases 
made using the card. Annual fees and 
grace periods vary, but she said the 
average fee is $25 to $35 and grace 
periods last 25 to 30 days from the 
purchase date. 

Jenkins' office has a variety of 
resource materials and sources to 
help charge card owners. 

"I had a call from a lady who had 
gotten a late notice for a house pay- 
ment that she thought had been paid," 
she said. "She felt that the late charge 
was excessive, and we were able to 
put her in touch with someone who 
could help." 




SHHR 

lDYNr4M.CS 

CUSTOM HAIR DESIGN. 1 12S lorort*. awcond floor, U*om»» Plena. 77W1O0 




Tune In To College Course Work 

Fall 1987 Courses 
Division of Continuing Education, Kansas State University 

1-800-432-8222 






The Story of English (LING 603) Amencan Adventure (HIST 251) Focus on Sooety '(SOCIO 211) 

Toacs n bngu^c? U S History to 1877 introduction to Society 

Toptcs in Linguistics j„ rtB , rariuaie Credits 3 Undergraduate Credits 

1 Undergraduate 01 Graduate Credit 3 Undergraduate t-reons - « w 

TuMdaus 9 d m Saturdays. 8 am baturaays. « p.m. 

255 S5L 6 Beg,nning August 29 ^Beg^nin^Augus,^ 



Clip the form below 
Complete the information 
Send to the Division of 
Continuing Education, 
Umberger Hall, Kansas 
State University, Manhattan, 
KS 66506 

Receive enrollment form 
Earn college credit 



Telecourse Information Form 



Name 



Mailing Address- 



.Work- 



Telephone Home — : : 

Send information on DThe Story of English aAmerican Adventure DFocus on Sooety 




1988 Royal Purple 

is still on sale in 
Kedzie 103 

(Hurry - after Sept. 18. the price goes upl) 



bctltook JQvtttoib 





m 



vakotoqx&pky studfo 



FARMHOUSE Sept. 22 
GAMMA PHI BETA Sept. 23-24 
KAPPA ALPHA THETA Sept. 24-25 
KAPPA DELTA Sept. 25 
KAPPA KAPPA GAMMA Sept. 28-29 
/\ KAPPA SIGMA Sept. 29 

/ \ LAMBDA CHI ALPHA Sept. 29-30 

L \ PHI DELTA THETA Sept. 30 

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f]f / \ PHI KAPPA TAU Oct, 1 

f^fZlrl \ PHI KAPPA THETA Oct. 1-2 

Wil 1 1 A PI BETA PHI Oct. 2, 5 

PI KAPPA ALPHA Oct. 5-6 

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SIGMA CHI Oct. 8 

SIGMA NU Oct. 8 

SIGMA PHI EPSILON Oct. 8 

SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA Oct. 9 

TAU KAPPA EPSILON Oct. 12 

THETA XI Oct. 12-13 

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BOYD Oct. 13-14 

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EDWARDS Oct. 14-15 

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HAYMAKER Oct. 21-22 

MARLATT Ocl. 23. 26 

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PUTNAM Oct. 27 

SMITH Ocl. 28 

SMURTHWAITE Oct. 28 

WEST Oct. 28-29 

OFF CAMPUS Oct 30 Nov. 2-6 

Carl Wolf Studio is the official photographic portrait service for the 1988 Royal Purple. It is 
important to make your appointment as soon as possible In Union 209 or on the living group 
sien-up sheets which will be available at your residence.. Cost of the sitting fee for color 
proofs is $3.50 and can be purchased in Kedzie 103. If there are any questions, call 
539-5229. 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. and 1:30 to 5:30 p.m.. Monday through Friday. 

Watch the Collegian for further details. 



ACACIA Sept. 8 
ALPHA CHI OMEGA Sept. 8-9 
ALPHA DELTA PI Sept. 9-10 
ALPHA GAMMA DELTA Sept. 10-11 
ALPHA GAMMA RHO Sept. 1 1 
ALPHA KAPPA LAMBDA Sept. 11. 14 
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ALPHA XI DELTA Sept. 15 
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CHI OMEGA Sept. 16-17 
DELTA DELTA DELTA Sept 
DELTA SIGMA PHI Sept. 18. 21 
DELTA TAU DELTA Sept. 21 
DELTA UPSILON Sept. 21-22 



17-18 



New-home market rising 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, W.dn.»d»y, Augu»l 26, 1987 



IS 



By Th» Associated Ptbu 

NEW YORK — What could make 
home builders happier than the 
recent jump in ihe construction of 
single-family homes? Buyers with 
bucks who want more than just your 
basic four walls and a roof. 

The number of single-family 
homes built in July increased an 
impressive 5.7 percent over the pre- 
vious month, according to Commer- 
ce Department figures released last 
week. 

What the figures failed to show is 
that these are not the ticky-tack star- 
ter dwellings of a previous 
generation. 

Increasingly, consumers in the 
new-home market are affluent and, 
often bolstered by two incomes, are 



looking for the Jacuzzi in the bath- 
room and the trash compactor in the 
kitchen. 

The share of new homes being 
bought by "trade-up buyers'* — peo- 
ple who already own homes but who 
are looking to upgrade their living 
quarters — is larger than ever before. 

The National Association of 
Home Builders says two-thirds of the 
estimated 1.16 million single-family 
homes built this year will be 
designed to serve this trade-up 
market. 

Underscoring the trend, the aver- 
age price of a new home has 
increased dramatically in the last few 
months, said Michael Carliner, an 
economist with the Washington, 
D.C.-based association. "That's not 
because the price of housing is up. 



but because the houses that are sell- 
ing arc the high-end houses." 

For example, the median price of a 
new home sold in June was 
$1 10,000, up substantially from the 
$91 ,200 median price of a new home 
a year earl icr. "Nearl y all the increase 
is because people arc buying bigger, 
fancier houses," Carliner explained. 

Builders have had to respond by 
adding space and amenities. "We're 
putting in all (he bells and whistles," 
said Paul Mashbum, president of 
Viking Builders Inc. of Winter Park. 
Fb., near Orlando. 

Outside the house, landscaping 
has become more elaborate. "It's no 
longer give 'cm 12 shrubs and a 
tree," Mashburn said. 

What this all means for builders is 
larger dollar volume and more detail. 



Roger GlunL president of Glunt 
Building Co., Inc., in the Pittsburgh 
suburb of Turtle Creek, Pa„ said he is 
adding stone fireplaces, custom 
cabinetry and plaster moldings to his 
homes. 

Smaller builders like Glunt are 
likely to be in a better position to 
adapt quickly to the changing needs 
and desires of home buyers. Carliner 
said the smaller custom builders are 
in line for a larger share of activity 
than the big companies that produce 
low-end homes. 

The recent rise in interest rates 
from a nine-year low of 9.47 percent 
in March is unlikely to deter most 
new home buyers. "Most new home 
buyers are not just on the margin of 
being able to pay for a house," Car- 
liner said. 



Small community 
seeks own location 



By The Associated Press 

LEONARD, Okla. — Exactly 
where in the world is Leonard? 

Residents of this tiny commun- 
ity south of Tulsa will have a pre- 
cise answer when the National 
Occanographic and Atmospheric 
Administration finishes a three- 
month project to chart the move- 
ment of the North American con- 
tinental plate. 

The Oklahoma Geophysical 
Observatory in Leonard is one of 
six places across the nation 



selected for the project. 

NOAA scientists are using an 
18-fooi-diametcr dish antenna 
and several radio receivers to 
track 18 distant quasars, or quasi- 
stellar objects, in space, said Bob 
Perkins, chief engineer of the 
project. 

By comparing the arrival time 
of radio signals from the quasars 
with readings at the other five 
observation places, the agency 
will be able to precisely measure 
distances between the six points 
and determine if the North Ameri- 
can plate is warping or is rigid. 



The most 
demanding 
challenging; 
enlightening, 

rigorous, 

satisfying, 

difficult, 

reyvanling, 

motivating and 

excitingcourse 

you can take 

in college. 




ARMY RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAININC CORPS 

For further information, contact the Department 
of Military Science at 532-6754/ 6755. 



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16 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, W«tn««dw. Auomt 2P, 1MT 



Highway plan examined 



By Th» AitOCtafcd tom 

WICHITA — Transportation Sec- 
retary Horace Edwards has cautioned 
critics of Gov. Mike Hayden's $1.7 
billion highway program not to see 
"hobgoblins" such as graft, corrup- 
tion and undue influence in the 
proposal 

"It is regretablc if we get into a dia- 
logue that is so unsavory," Edwards 
said Monday night after hearing 
more than 30 of the 100 people 
attending a forum in the Sedgwick 
County Courthouse speak about the 
program. 

Hearing the parade of witnesses 
were 14 of the area's 18 state rep- 
resentatives and five of its six 
senators. 

Rep. JoArut Pottorff, R-Wichita, 
chairman of the county's legislative 
delegation, said she could see no way 
that the total delegation would sup- 
port the governor's program. 

"In the end, however, I see us 
working together and supporting a 
highway package," said Pottorff, 
who will try to mold a unified 
approach for the delegation to 
address a plan. That probably won't 
happen, she said, until legislators go 



Wichita forum draws 
'parade' of people 
to hear legislators 



to Topeka for the special session 
beginning Monday. 

After the forum. Rep. Henry Het- 
gerson, D- Wichita, said he thought it 
was time for legislators of both par- 
ties "to publicly support the gover- 
nor's proposal or a comprehensive 
road program similar in scope and 
magnitude." 

"A good road program won't 
ensure economic development, but a 
poor road system surely will stymie 
any economic recovery for our 
state," Helgerson said. 

Speakers against the governor's 
program often cited the cost, the fear 
that high tax and fee increases would 
drive business out of state and the 
fear that little new money would be 
available for other essential state 
programs. 

Some witnesses pointed to the $30 
million bond attorney fees built into 



the highway package as one of the 
"hobgoblins" that Edwards later 
referred to. 

Other speakers raised the specter 
of political friends making excessive 
money on highway contracts raised 
or the possibility of Kansas money 
going to out-of-state contractors. 

To finance his program, the gover- 
nor has proposed a 5 -cent increase in 
motor fuels taxes and 25 precent to 
100 percent increases in registration 
fees, adjusted annually to reflect 
inflation. 

"I don't like pledging so much for 
one program without knowing what 
we can afford for other programs," 
said Margaret Miller, who represents 
the elderly on a community 
organization. 

"Modify the plan to an affordable 
program," said Pat Lehman, 
secretary-treasurer of District 70 of 



the Machinists' union. 

Backers of the comprehensive 
plan dwelled on the economic bene- 
fits, driver convenience and safety. 

Among those who spoke in favor 
were Sedgwick County Commis- 
sioner Mark Schroeder; Wichita 
Mayor Bob Knight; Terry Scanlon, 
former director of the Kansas 
Department of Economic Develop- 
ment; and retired truck driver Harry 
Dyke. 

Passage of the proposed program, 
said Schroeder, would be a signal 
that "Kansas is willing to bid for bus- 
iness and jobs." 

Knight said an improved road sys- 
tem would give more people belter 
access to Wichita's medical 
facilities. 

Frank Woodman Jr., owner of a 
small construction firm, said the 
program would cost him more 
money in expenses but urged support 
of it and an end "to bickering over 
who gets the benefits." 

Several members of the Machin- 
ists' union, including Gregory 
Ohmcs who is president of its retirees 
club, said that while it supports some 
improvements, it objects to the high 
cost of die governor's plan. 



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•The folks back home- 



want to keep up with what's 

happening in your life 
at Kansas State University. 

A subscription to the Kansas State Collegian will keep them 
up-to-date on campus events and other Manhattan activities. 

If you get too busy to write a letter every week, at least your family 
and friends will get news through the Kansas State Collegian , the 
nationally recognized, award-winning student newspaper. 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN SUBSCRIPTION 

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to: Student Publications; Kedzie Hall 103; Kansas State University, 
Manhattan, Kan. 66506. 



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.By: 



Leader proposes 
joint U.N. meeting 
to discuss funds 



By The Associated Press 

UNITED NATIONS — Soviet 
leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev 
today proposed that leaded <>nhc 
15 nations on the U.N. Security 
Council meet to discuss how 
money saved from disarmament 
could be spent on economic 
development. 

The Kremlin chief made the 
suggestion in a message read by 
Soviet Deputy Foreign Minister 
Vladimir F. Pctrovsky to the 
140-nation International Confer- 
ence on the Relationship between 
Disarmament and Development. 

"It would be useful to discuss in 
principle the problems of disar- 
mament and development at a 
special meeting of top leaders of 
member states of the U.N. Securi- 
ty Council," Gorbachev said in 
the message. 

The Soviet leader also prop- 
osed that the United Nations cre- 
ate an international fund into 



which member states would place 
money saved through disarma- 
ment 

The United States has express- 
ed opposition to a linkage 
between the issues of disarma- 
ment and development and 
refused to send any representa- 
tives to the current conference, 
which began Monday and runs 
through Sept. 11. 

Gorbachev referred to the U.S. 
action, saying: "Obstacles erected 
by the opponents of disarmament 
on the road towards the confer- 
ence have confirmed once again 
the interdependence of disarma- 
ment and development and the 
urgency of the task." 

He also repealed the Soviet 
government's accusation that the 
United States and West Germany 
are blocking progress on arms 
control by insisting on retaining 
72 Pershing 1-A rockets stationed 
in West Germany and armed with 
American warheads. 



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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN. W«dn«td«y. AuguH 26, If 7 



17 




Caller fakes bomb threat 



On the edge 



Culk gun/I) rid Cimp 



Jim Schoen, University facilities employee, paints the window 
sills of the fourth floor stacks at Farrell Library Tuesday 
afternoon. 



By The Associated Press 

ARCADIA, Fla. — A bomb threat 
forced temporary evacuation of an 
elementary school Tuesday when 
three brothers exposed to the AIDS 
virus aimed for their second day of 
class under court orders. 

Later, a caller to the school admi- 
nistrative offices simply said "boom" 
and hung up, said DeSoto County 
Sheriff Joe Vamadore. After the fust 
call, the school was searched, 
nothing was found and routines were 
resumed, said Larry Browning, 
school superintendent. 

"We'll get to the bottom of this, 
particularly if they call again and I'll 
press charges," Browning said, call- 
ing the incidents "hurtful to the 
school district, ihe children and the 
taxpayers." 

He said tracers were being put on 
school telephone lines. 

Elsewhere, a school board 50 
miles away has voted to bar another 
child who tested positive for the 
AIDS virus, and parents in a Tennes- 
see community are threatening a 
boycott of school if a young AIDS 
carrier is admitted. 

Arcadia's Memorial Elementary 
School has been the subject of protest 
rallies and parents* calls for a student 
boycott since a federal judge ruled 
that the Ray brothers — Ricky, 10, 
Robert, 9, and Randy 8 — have the 
right to attend classes with other 
children. 



Many parents fear their children 
could be exposed to acquired 
immune deficiency syndrome by the 
brothers. Physicians maintain the 
virus that causes AIDS cannot be 
passed on through casual school con- 
tact; the brothers have no symptoms 
of AIDS. 

On Tuesday, 380 children showed 
up for class and more than 300 stayed 
home. On Monday's opening day, 
337 students showed up. 

The first bomb-lhrcat call was 



received at 8:03 a.m., just as Ihe Ray 
boys arrived. As on the first day, 
police were guarding the grounds. 

Some parents who had taken their 
children to school decided to take 
them back home after the first 
threatening call, said Principal 
Donald Knochc. 

By midaftcmoon, there had been 
no other incidents, "It's been real 
quiet; we've had a good day." 
Knochc said then. 

DeSoto school officials barred the 



brothers, all hemophiliacs, from 
class last fall after they tested posi- 
tive for antibodies to the AIDS virus. 
Their parents, Louise and Clifford 
Ray, filed a discrimination suit and 
on Aug. 5 a federal judge in Tampa 
ordered the school board to reinstate 
the boys. 

Doctors said they probably were 
infected through blood plasma-based 
products they were given, so their 
blood would clot in case of injury. 





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Model 



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I. Cassette Decks 

Dragon Sold 
CR-7A Sold 
RX-505 1 Demo 
CR-5A Sold 
BX-300 Sold 
RX-202 1 Demo 
BX-125 1 Demo 
BX-100 8 in stock 



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1,495.00 
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750.00 
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Model Suggested 

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II. Compact Disc Players 

OMS-7A II Sold $1,850.00 
OMS-5A II Sold 1,495.00 
OMS-4A 1 Demo 995.00 
OMS-3A 3 in stock 850.00 
OMS-2A 3 in stock 529.00 

III. Receivers 

SR-4A Sold $895.00 
SR-3A 3 in stock 650.00 
SR-2A 6 in stock 449.00 


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KAN8A9 STATE COLLEQIAN, W«dn— diy. Augutt 26, 1M7 



Heirs seek money 



iy Th» Astoctetod Pwtt 

TOPEKA — Loma Anderson 
Eldridge was the first one to ask 
about getting a new life insurance 
policy for Martin K, Anderson, but 
it was her late husband who actual- 
ly bought the policy and owned it, 
the agent who sold the policy testi- 
fied Tuesday. 

Chris Kimble of Emporia, the 
agent, said Loma Anderson, who 
has remarried, signed none of the 
documents required to purchase 
the $270,000 policy in the spring of 
1983, some six months before 
Anderson was killed. 

Kimble was the first witness at a 
trial to determine validity of the 
policy and whether the company 
that issued it. New England Mutual 
Life Insurance Co., must pay the 
proceeds from that policy to the 
four children of Martin and Loma 
Anderson. 

New England Mutual claims the 
policy was obtained by fraud and 
should be invalidated. It alleges 
deceit was involved because Loma 
Anderson intended to kill Ander- 
son or have him killed in order to 
collect the money. 

Eldridge first made claim tor the 
money herself immediately after 
Anderson's death, but last fall 
renounced her claim and said the 
money should go to the children — 
four girls ranging in age from 6 to 
13, 

Kimble testified Eldridge came 
to him in April 1983 — three 
months after a previous $300,000 
policy on Anderson's life lapsed 
because of failure to make pre- 
mium payments — and said 
Anderson needed his insurance 



reinstated because she' feared he 
was considering committing 
suicide. 

Kimble said he gave her an 
application form. Several days 
later, he testified, Anderson dis- 
cussed the insurance matter with 
him at a meeting of a civic club of 
which both were members. After 
that, Anderson made application 
for a new policy, which was issued 
about a month later after he took 
two physical examinations. 

Asked if Loma signed for any- 
thing in connection with the 
issuance of the policy, Kimble 
replied, "No, sir." 

He also testified that all the pap- 
ers needed to issue the policy were 
in proper order, and that all pay- 
ments were made on the policy 
until Anderson was killed 5'A 
months later, on Nov. 4, 1983. 

Anderson also paid $30 for an 
additional $100,000 for one 
month's coverage when he went on 
Army Reserve summer duty in 
1983, Kimble said, although that 
was a temporary arrangement and 
he later tore up the check. 

Kimble said he only had a few 
contacts with Anderson between 
selling him the new policy and his 
death. 

Another witness Tuesday, 
Daniel R. Carter, 39, of Emporia, 
testified about his love affair with 
Loma Anderson during the sum- 
mer of 1982, and his involvement 
in an effort initiated the next year 
by Loma to hire someone to kill 
Anderson. 

Under questioning by Edward 
Hund of Wichita, the attorney for 
the Anderson family. Carter con- 
firmed that all his dealings with 



Stu dents Are Welco me! 
mGREAT El 

Co mmission 
""Ch urch 

Statement of Faith: 



We believe the Bible to be the 
Inspired, the only Infallible, 
authoritative Word of God. 

Wc believe there Is one 
almighty, perfect and triune 
Cod: Father, Son, and Holy 
Spirit, eternally coexistent 
personalities of the same 
essence. 

We believe in the deity of our 
Lord Jesus Christ, In fits virgin 
birth, tils sinless life. His 
substitutionary death. His 
bodily resurrection. His 
ascension to the right hand of 
the Father and His personal 
return in power and glory. 
We believe In the personality of 
the Holy Spirit, and in His 
ministry of convicting and 
regenerating sinful men, and 
indwelling, scaling and 
empowering believe™. 



We believe In the bill of man 
from the state of Innocence in 
which he was created to one of 
total depravity In which he Is 
devoid of spiritual Hie. and 
incapable, apart from divine 
power, of pleasing God. 
We believe In the Justification 
of the sinner by grace through 
faith alone. 

We believe that the church 
universal Is composed of all 
true believers and that Us 
members should assemble 
themselves together In local 
churches for worship, prayer, 
fellowship and teaching with a 
view to being equipped to fulfill 
the Great Commission. 
We believe In the bodily 
resurrection of the saved to 
immortality, and In the 
conscious eternal suffering of 
the lost. 



10:30 a.m. Sundays 
University Inn (17th & Anderson) 




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Loma Anderson regarding solicit- 
ing a person to kit! Anderson came 
three months or more after the 
$270,000 insurance policy was 
issued. 

In his opening statement Tues- 
day, Hund said Martin Anderson 
bought life insurance to provide 
financial security for his depen- 
dents, and whether his wife plotted 
his murder lo try to collect on that 
policy is irrevelant to the insurance 
company's duty to pay off on the 
policy. 

"Marty Anderson believed in 
life insurance, he was aware his 
four children wouldn't have the 
level of support if he wasn't 
around, and despite any secret plan 
or design on his life he obtained 
this replacement policy," said 
Hund. 

However, Terrance Crebs of St. 
Louis, the attorney for New Eng- 
land Mutual, argued Eldridge, who 
is in prison for plotting the murder 
of her Tint husband and is under a 
murder charge for his death, was 
instrumental in obtaining the poli- 
cy on Anderson's life and her 
intent to kill him or have him killed 
constituted fraud which invalidates 
the policy. 

Hund said the policy provided 
for $60,000 in whole life insur- 
ance, $60,000 in accidental life 
insurance and $150,000 in term life 
insurance — a total of $270,000, if 
Anderson's death was accidental. 

"We're not here to defend Loma 
Anderson," Hund told the jury of 
five men and three women selected 
Monday to hear and decide the 
civil suit brought by the company, 
which is seeking to have the insur- 
ance policy voided. 



Health official adds 2 to staff 



By The Assocloted Preis 

TOPEKA — Stanley Grant, sec- 
reiary of Health and Environment, 
today announced the appointments 
of two people to oversee his depart- 
ment's disease prevention efforts. 

Richard L. Parker, 58. will admi- 
nister the agencies epidemiological 



programs, which include immuniza- 
tion and statewide monitoring of 
diseases. 

Parker currently is the state epide- 
miologist and a bureau chief in the 
South Carolina Department of 
Health and Environmental Control 
and was on the staff of the national 
Centers for Disease Control in Atlan- 



ta for 20 yean. He will join the Kan- 
sas Department of Health and Envi- 
ronment on Oct 1. 

Cindy Wood, 33, was appointed 
state epidemiologist. She previously 
was an assistant professor in the Uni- 
versity of Kansas School of Medi- 
cine's Department of Preventive 
Medicine. 



Supreme Court nullifies rule 



By Th» Associated Press 

TOPEKA — The Kansas Supreme 
Court has abolished a rule that allow- 
ed lawyers who passed bar examina- 
tions in other states to begin practic- 
ing in Kansas without taking the 
state's bar exam. 

The court abolished the rule effec- 



tive July 15. Supreme Court Justice 
Richard Holmes, the liaison between 
the court and the Slate Board of Law 
Examiners, said Monday the court 
abolished the rule to keep the the pro- 
fession's standards high in the state. 
Lawyers who passed bar exams in 
other states previously only had to 
l ile a motion with the state Supreme 



Court and meet a short list of 
requirements. 

Holmes said about 25 applications 
were pending under the old rule, and 
ihosc lawyers will be allowed to 
practice without having to take the 
Kansas bar exam. The court normal- 
ly receives about 35 such applica- 
tions each year. 




Tonight 

Pitchers 

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■a .y.-c-K-inC-ll M:^ : 



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Student and Faculty 

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Six-year struggle ceases 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Wednesday, AuguH 26, 1967 



IS 



By The Associated Press 

NEWARK, NJ. - - An experi- 
ment in employee ownership ended 
as a roller bearing company ceased 
operations after a six-year struggle lo 
survive, forced to close a week early 
because its worker-owners were 
sabotaging equipment, its president 
said Tuesday. 

"It's a biucr pill to swallow," 
George Ecklcs, a United Auto Work- 
ers shop chairman at Hyatt-Clark 
Industries, said as a few workers 
cleaned up machinery and finished 
paperwork. 

President Howard Kurt informed 
HCI employees last Saturday thai the 
plant was shutting down immediate- 
ly. The plant, which was in bankrupt- 
cy proceedings, had been scheduled 
to close Aug. 28. 

Workers bought the plant in 1981 
from General Motors Corp., which 
wanted to close ii. Although it 
showed profit in some years since, it 
was hurt by foreign competition and 
outdated equipment. 

Kurt said Tuesday that instances 
of sabotage prompted an early clos- 



Workers sabotage 
factory machinery 



ing to protect the "health and safety" 
of the workers. He said some equip- 
ment was damaged or tampered with 
and some outgoing product was 
damaged. 

Ecklcs said workers fell like pris- 
oners during the company's final 
days, when they were required to 
remain in groups under supervision 
because of management's fear of 
sabotage. 

He conceded that some machinery 
was slightly damaged by angry 
employees. 

General Motors owned HCI for 
four decades and accounted for 90 
percent of its business. Workers took 
a 25 percent pay cut and borrowed 
$53 million in a bid to save the com- 
pany and their jobs. 

Employees bought the plant under 
an Employee Stock Ownership Plan, 
in which employees receive stock in 
the company as part of their 



compensation. 

Kurt said the company, which had 
$46 million in revenues in its last fis- 
cal year, was one of the lamest 
industrial companies to be bought by 
its workers. It was also one of the first 
times a troubled company was saved 
by an ESOP. Kurt said. 

At first, employee ownership 
seemed lo work, raising morale and 
restoring profitability in 1983. 

"Everybody was putting every- 
thing they had into it," Eckles said. 

But trouble began again two years 
later, and hourly employees staged a 
work slowdown after a bid for a pay 
increase was turned down. 

Financial problems led the com- 
pany to file for bankruptcy protection 
in January 1986, and last fall GM 
said it would not renew its bearing 
contract with HCI. 

The company, which once 
employed 1 .600 people, was down to 



300 by last week. 

Compounding the problems was 
ihc recent discovery of industrial 
waste at the plant. The discovery 
complicates efforts to repay nearly 
S50 million in debts and $21 million 
claimed by workers, officials said. 

"Employee ownership is not a way 
lo circumvent fundamental prob- 
lems," said David H. Blake, dean of 
Rutgers University's Graduate 
School of Management. "They had 
an awful lol of serious competition 
and strategic issues." 

Machinery was outdated, foreign 
competition was damaging the roller 
bearing industry and management 
and workers suffered from ingrained 
hostility and antagonism, he said. 

"Thai's not something they resol- 
ved," he added. 

Eckles blamed insensitive man- 
agement and bank lenders for alie- 
nating the workers. 

In Kurt's view, the failure resulted 
because the union wanted early pro- 
fits to be paid out immediately rather 
lhan being reinvested in the 
company. 



Landing gear fails 
during Hay den's 
flight to Winfield 



By The Associated Press 

WINFIELD — The state plane 
carrying Gov, Mike Hayden was 
diverted to Wichita Tuesday 
morning because of landing gear 
problem. It landed without inci- 
dent at the Executive Bccchcraft 
Airport. 

Hayden and his parly went on 
by car to Winfield, the first slop of 
the day in another round of barns- 
torming on behalf of the gover- 
nor's multi-billion dollar highway 
program. 

The governor, whose highway 
proposal will be considered by 
state lawmakers in a special ses- 
sion next week, continued by car 
to Arkansas City and Sedan. His 
press secretary, Kathy Peterson, 
said the landing gear problem had 
been repair and that the plane was 
scheduled lo pick up Hayden at 



Independence for a flight to lola, 
where the day was to wind up with 
an evening appearance. 

The plane, a Kingair Beech 
300, left Topcka about 8:15 a.m. 
for Winfield, carrying a crew of 
two, Hayden and his aide Sue 
Peterson, and iwo lawmakers, 
Sen. Gus Bogina, R-Lcncxa, 
chairman of the Senate Ways and 
Means Committee, and Rep. Bill 
Bunlcn, R-Topcka, chairman of 
the House Appropriations 
Committee. 

Because of the mechanical 
problem, the twin-engine turbo- 
prop plane passed up its sche- 
duled landing at Sirolhcr Field in 
Winfield. 

"The circuit breaker on the 
landing gear popped," said Li. 
Jack Garrison of the Kansas High- 
way Patrol, the governor's chief 
pilot. 



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Bridal Registry 

Let our trained sales staff help you in your gift 
selections. Gift wrapping, mailing, easy lay a way, and 
bank card shopping make your gift giving even more 
enjoyable. 

Campbell 's welcomes you to Manhattan 

and hopes you will visit us while you are here. 

Poyntz Avenue at Fifth 1227 Moro Street 

776-9067 539-1891 

Downtown Aggieville 

-,.i i ■■ —i. ■■■ 



THE INCREDIBLE ADVENTURES OF JACK FLANDERS 

The Mastergamer Fantasy-Adventure Theatre 

Episode I, "The Green Velvet Chair." 
Late one stormy night, the velvet chair is 

delivered. Jack sits in the chair and begins to 

dream of far-off lands. He is sitting in an arena full 

of cutthroat pirates. 
Jack leaps from the chair, but the green 

velvet chair draws him back, forcing him to sit 

and to dream . . . and this time there is no 

escape. 

TONIGHT and EACH WEDNESDAY NIGHT at 9:30. 

KSDBDBS 

■ m ^^ ^^ ^^ KSDB 919 

Underwritten by The Mastergamer 
Board Games D & D Figures 

The largest selection of comic books 
in the area. 

Mastergamer, 1205 Moro m Aggievme 



10-MINUTE SERVICE 

ON 
OIL CHANGE, LUBE & FILTER 

{No appointment necessary) 

A/C Repair & Minor Mechanical Work Done 

Wayne's Quik Lube 

i_j a „ ™ con ^ m 

539-5431 



Hours: 8 a.m. -5:30 p.m. 



2304 Sky-Vue Lane 



Kansas State Bank 




STUDENT LOANS 






We want to make 
your student loan! 

Simply contact us at: 

537-4400 

Lender Code #821176 



If you have received your promissory note, bring it in or 
mail it to Kansas State Bank, 1010 Westloop or 11th & 
Bluemont. 



Kansas State Bank 



Sample the Best 

in the 

Arts and Entertainment 

with a 

KSU Student Ticket Package 

Save 15% off list prices! 



McCain Auditorium 

1987-88 KSU Season Ticket Package 



Roger Miller 
and Tom Chapin 

Friday, September 25. 1 p.m. 
Eleven -time Grammy Award* 
winner Roger Miller and I he 
versatile Tom Chap in |0in 
forces for an evening trial 
promises a lit He bit ot coun- 
try, a tittle bit ot pop. a little 
bit of Broadway, and a whole 
lot ol tun! Roger Mitler will 
perlorm his tavonle songs - 
such hits as Dang Me.' 

England Swings,' Kansas 
City Star, and, ol course. 

King ol the Road " Tom 
Chapin is a Highly regarded 
singer, songwmer. guitarist 
and actor , who can currently 
be seen as the host ol 
television s National Geo- 
graphic Explorer 




i iiinki \>n is 





Stale Ballet ol Missouri 

Monday. November 9, 8 p m. 

Under the artistic direction ol 
inter nationally acclaimed 
choreographer Todd Bolender. 
the Slate Ballet ol Missouri 
has attracted national atten- 
tion lor the beauty, quality 
and excilemeni ol us perfor- 
mances Hailed "theieweloi 
the Midwest, the 25- 
member company will pre sen i 
a sinking repertory ol dra- 
matic, romantic, humorous, 
and contemporary works 

Camerata Musica 
ol the DOR 

Zelika Slraka. conductor 
Saturday. January 30. S p.m. 
Composed ol the linesi 
musicians trom East Ger- 
many s leading orchestras 
the Camerata Musica ol ihe 
DDR is making us debut lour 
ol the United States This 
award-winning chamber 
orchestra peilorms a repei 
tone that spans the German 
and Italian baroque as well as 
me classical and cantempoi 
dry penods Under the 
leadership ol Zehka Strait* 
me Camerata Musica nas 
become synonymous with 
Slylish piectse performance 
and oeautilul sound 



The Guthrie Theatre 

Frankenstein 

Monday, Match 21, 8 p.m. 
Tne Guthne Theatre returns lo 
the McCain stage with a new 
adaptaiion ot Mary Shelley s 
harrowing classic lale ol a 
creature without parent, 
without peer Playwright 
Barbaia Field, who wrote ihe 
script tot the Guthrie s spec- 
tacular Great Expectations, 
locuses not on mad scientist 
or monster, but on Ihe 
question of responsibility 
between creator and a crea- 
tion Frankenstein tells the 
psychologically rich, very 
human story ol the unpredic- 
table troubles that can belall 
our best ideas 



King 

flodgers 

and Hammerstein 

The King and I 
Friday, April IS. 8 p.m. 
The captivating story ol a 
strong-willed English gover- 
ness and and a despotic king 
who yearns to be progressive 
is brought to the siage m one 
ot Broadway s most popular 
and charming musicals 
Winner ol 5 Tony Awards. 
The King and I sparkles wilh 
memorable songs like Hello 
Young Lovers'". Getting to 
Know You.' "I Whistle a 
Happy Tune, and Shall We 
Dance? ". The King and I has 
everything needed for i 
memorable evening ot 
theatre spectacular sets and 
costumes a fascinating story 
and breathtaking music and 
lyrics 



\KSU Student Season Package 

I Orchestra seating: $56.95 Lowei Balcony: $48 45 



Name 

Address _ 
Phone 



.Student l.D.iV. 



KSU Student Season Ticket Packages may be 
purchased at the McCain Auditorium Box Office 
Limit one Package per student 
Please present Student ID. when buying tickets 
Box office hours are 12-5 iVIF Phone 532-6428 

Financial assistance lor me McCain Performance Series Has 
oecn uiuvideo M part Oy the Kansas Arts Commission me 
Mid-Amenca Arts Alliance and the National Endowment for the 
Ans 



-*-'* 



■ ■W^ H; *.— 



20 KANSAS 8TATE COLLEGIAN. Wedneeday. Auauet », 1W7 

U.S. presents verification procedures 



By vm Attoctofd Pnm 

GENEVA — The United States 
presented new proposals on Tuesday 
that it said would simplify verifica- 
tion procedures under a U.S. -Soviet 
agreement to do away with all 
intermediate-range nuclear missiles. 

Members of the American delega- 
tion submitted the proposals in a 
meeting of the negotiating teams 
dealing with Intermediate Nuclear 
Forces — medium- and shorter- 
range weapons with ranges from 300 
to 3,000 miles. 

U.S. spokesman Terry Shroeder 
said that Soviet acceptance in July of 
eliminating all intermediate wea- 
pons, called the double-zero option, 
had enabled the United States to 
change its verification requirements. 

Before the Soviet announcement, 
the plan had been for each superpow- 
er to keep 100 medium-range wea- 
pons on its own territory. 

'Today we are laying out how this 



simplification could be achieved," 
Schroeder said, adding that the U.S. 
proposals, "although simplified, will 
stilt be the most stringent ever prop- 
osed in any U.S. -Soviet negotiations 
and will include on-site inspection." 

In Washington, State Department 
spokeswoman Phyllis Oakley was 
asked whether the new U.S. position 
drops some intrusive measures, 
including inspection of factories and 
intelligence monitoring sites. 

She replied: "There are two major 
changes in this. One is we have 
changed our 'suspect site' inspection 
proposal because the opportunity for 
illegal missile activities are signific- 
antly reduced when an entire class of 
missiles and its infrastructure has 
been eliminated. 

"Also, we have dropped our 
requirement for perimeter-portal 
monitoring. This was done because 
the perimeter-portal monitoring sys- 
tem was designed to monitor the flow 
of missiles from production and final 



assembly facilities. 

"With the production ban and the 
elimination of all INF (Intermediate 
Nuclear Forces) missiles within three 
years this would be unnecessary." 

Shroeder would not give details of 
the proposals, citing the confidential- 
ity rule the two sides have adopted in 
the talks. 

He said the U.S. delegation 
"sharply rejected suggestions in U.S. 
media reports that we are backing off 
or softening our proposals." 

On Monday in Washington, a U.S. 
official told The Associated Press on 
condition of anonymity that the new 



American proposals would scale 
back demands for on-site inspection 
of nuclear missile facilities. 

He said they would lessen require- 
ments for surprise inspection of 
Soviet facilities and exclude highly 
sensitive areas. 

According to the official, 
Washington wants to be able to send 
U.S. monitors to Soviet sites with 
little advance notice, which appa- 
rently would be more acceptable to 
the Soviets than complete surprise 

visits. 

Attention has focused on interme- 
diate weapons as the most likely area 



for quick accord at the Geneva arms 
talks. The other two negotiating 
groups deal with strategic, or inter- 
continental, nuclear forces and the 
combined field of space and defense. 

Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorba- 
chev proposed Tuesday that a meet- 
ing of leaders of the U.N. Security 
Council's 15 member nations be held 
to discuss how money saved through 
disarmament could be spent on eco- 
nomic development His ideas were 
expressed in a message delivered to 
the United Nations in New York. 

Agreements on strategic arms and 
on space and defense have been 



blocked by Soviet demands for limits 
on the U.S. Strategic Defense Initia- 
tive, the space-based defense system 
commonly called "Star Wars." The 
United Stales has rejected the 
demands. 

Both sides say agreement on inter- 
mediate arms may be close, but diffi- 
cult issues remain. 

Negotiators have worked through 
the summer trying to resolve the 
problems before the scheduled meet- 
ing Sept. 15-17 in Washington of 
Secretary of State George P. Shullz 
and the Soviet foreign minister, 
Eduard A Shevardnadze. 



Convict sentenced 



By Ths Awocioittd Press 

WICHITA — A Wichita man was 
sentenced to life in prison Tuesday 
for the beating and stabbing death of 
an elderly acquaintance. 

Sedgwick County District Judge 
Montie Deer sentenced Duke Norris, 
19, to life in prison for first-degree 



murder and five to 20 years for rob- 
bery. Assistant District Attorney 
Julia Craft said Norris would be elig- 
ible for parole in 18 years. 

Norris was convicted by a jury last 
month for the slaying and robbery of 
Gearldean Harness, 69, who was 
beaten with a lamp and stabbed in the 
back at his borne. 



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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, W»dn«i<tay, August 28, 1987 



21 



Residential district 
ready to reappraise 
its property value 



By Staff end Wire Reports 

Approximately 25 percent of the 
residential district in Riley County 
has been prepared for the state's 
reappraisal. 

Although specific values will not 
be placed on the property until 
October of 1988, Sam Schmidt, 
Riley County appraiser, said the pro- 
cess has been going smoothly, 

"I know that there has been some 
trouble in other counties, but they 
were mainly because of political 
problems," Schmidt said. 



"We're never as far along 
as I'd like to be. If we 
were, we'd be finished 
now. When you look at 
105 counties, you're 
going to have problems. 
But we'll do everything 
humanly possible to 
achieve our goals." 
—George Donatelto 

The appraiser's office is presently 
taking inventory of the land in the 
county. By using aerial photography, 
Schmidt said property boundries will 
be measured and logged. 

On the state level, George 
Donate! lo, the state coordinator of 
the program told the Legislature's 
interim study Committee on Assess- 
ment and Taxation that the process 
should be completed on schedule by 
January 1989. 



"I think, all in all, it's going very 
well." said Donatelto. "We're never 
as far along as I*d like to be. If we 
were, we'd be finished now. When 
you look at 105 counties, you're 
going to have problems. But we'll do 
everything humanly possible to 
achieve our goals." 

The 1985 Legislature ordered all 
real estate in Kansas reappraised in 
order to eliminate inequity and dis- 
parity in how property was being 
assessed within counties and from 
county to county. 

The Legislature also submitted lo 
voters a constitutional amendment 
establishing assessed valuations for 
classes of property, which take effect 
in January 1989 when the reappraisal 
effort will be finished. Kansans 
approved the amendment last 
November, 

Donatello had some good news for 
the counties. 

The state will distribute next week 
the first quarter checks to help pay 
for the reappraisal effort. The Legis- 
lature appropriated $10.8 million for 
the current fiscal year, to be distri- 
buted in four payments. That will pay 
for about half the counties' expenses 
this year for reappraisal. 

Now, the push is to finish reapprai- 
sal on schedule. 

Donatello told the committee 
535,000 of the estimated 1 .5 million 
parcels of property statewide have 
now been mapped, which is 36 per- 
cent, and that data collection has 
been completed on 210.000 parcels, 
or 14 percent. 




Out of reach 

Scott Kram, freshman in architectural design, grimaces as he cra- 
dles his hands in anticipation of a catch as Jim Wassenberg, fresh- 



Siiff/Grcg Vogel 



man in biochemistry, stretches Tor the ball Tuesday afternoon dur- 
ing an Eighth Floor Haymaker Hall flag football team practice. 



(T 



Rec Services is Now Hiring!! 

Flag Football 
Officials 

Attend these meetings: 

t. Thursday, Aug. 27 at 6:30 p.m. 

K-State Union Rm. 213 
2. Sunday, Aug. 30 at 5 p.m. 

Intramural fields/Rec Complex 

Crt » flr 3. Monday, Aug. 31 at 5 p.m. 
aoccer ^s tate Unjor)t g^^atf 

Officials 

Attend these meetings: 
I.Tuesday, Sept. 1 at 6:30 p.m. 

K-State Union, Rm. 209 
2. Wednesday, Sept. 2 at 6:30 p.m 

K-State Union, Rm. 209 





AIM HIGH 





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"WHAT DO I DO 
AFTER COLLEGE?" 

That 1 * a question many college students are asking They also 
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Call the Aerospace Studies Department 
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22 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Wtdnetdiy, August 2«, 1M7 



New Mexico man pleads 
guilty in ethanol case 



By The Assockited Press 

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — A New 
Mexico man pleaded guilty Mon- 
day in federal court to involvement 
in a business scheme in which 
investors lost millions of dollars on 
a venture to build and operate etha- 
nol plants. 

The guilty plea of Kenneth D. 
Sinks Jr. of Farmington. N.M„ 
came just hours before a jury was 
chosen for the trial of a Kansas City 
lawyer who is charged in the same 
case. 

Sinks pleaded guilty to one 
count of conspiracy and one count 
of tax fraud in a case that focuses 
on the collapse of a Joplin, Mo., 
firm called Midwestern Cos. Inc., 
said Willard Bunch, an attorney in 
the case. 

Bunch represents the Kansas 
City lawyer, Thomas Tiemey. 
Sinks was to have stood trial with 
Tiemey but now will testify against 
him, said Bunch. The trial is 
expected to last three weeks. 

Tiemey was general counsel, 
vice chairman and director of Mid- 
western from May 1983 to March 
1984. He already has been con- 
victed by a district court jury in 
New Mexico on charges relating to 
his involvement with Midwestern. 

The Albuquerque jury found 
him guilty of two counts of conspi- 
racy, three counts of fraud, one 
count of racketeering and one 
count of criminal solicitation in 



what officials alleged was one of 
the largest fuel-related investment 
frauds in the Midwest. 

Midwestern and its New Mexico 
subsidiary. Titan Energy Engineer- 
ing Inc., were involved in building 
23 ethanol plants in New Mexico 
and Louisiana. The company built 
plants at a cost of about $1.5 mil- 
lion each using money from indust- 
rial revenue bonds. Each plant was 
sold to investors for $3.5 million. 

Investors throughout the coun- 
try bought the bonds, and Kansas 
City investors bought several 
plants. Not all of the plants were 
completed. 

Prosecutors in the New Mexico 
trial said the company overvalued 
the worth of its plants by more than 
$62 million. Prosecutors alleged 
that nearly 1,500 investors and 
stockholders lost a combined $250 
million when Midwestern went 
bankrupt in 1984. 

Tiemey, also former general 
counsel for the Land Clearance for 
Redevelopment Authority of Kan- 
sas City, was indicted Jan. 21 in 
Kansas City along with Sinks and 
two other men. 

The defendants besides Tiemey 
and Sinks were Ronald Walker of 
Joplin, Mo., former president of 
Midwestern, and Carl E. Wright of 
Independence, former accountant 
and secretary -treasurer of Mid- 
western. They have pleaded guilty 
and are expected to testify for the 
government. 



Tiemey is charged in all 22 
counts of the indictment. Sinks had 
been charged in 17 counts. He is a 
chemical engineer and was a Mid- 
western shareholder and executive 
vice president of Titan Energy 
Engineering. 

The indictment alleged that they 
were involved in conspiracy, tax 
fraud and security fraud. 

A federal grand jury alleged that 
the men developed a plan for Mid- 
western to build and sell ethanol 
plants to partnerships that would 
receive investment and energy tax 
credits. 

Midwestern allegedly sold the 
plants to investors as lucrative tax 
shelters. Prosecutors in the New 
Mexico case maintained that Mid- 
western officials concealed that the 
plants were not completed in time 
to qualify for the lax benefits that 
investors were supposed to get in 
1982. 

Tiemey, Sinks and the other 
alleged conspirators also are 
accused of drumming up more than 
$ 1 3 million in fictitious and exces- 
sive depreciation deductions, 
investment lax credits and energy 
tax credits to the partners, accord- 
ing to the indictment 

To carry out the scheme, the 
conspirators allegedly filed false 
and fraudulent tax returns with the 
Internal Revenue Service and 
fraudulent financial reports with 
the Securities and Exchange Com- 
mission. 



Boeing delays 7J7 launching 



By The Associated Press 

WICHITA — Citing mixed sig- 
nals from some potential major cus- 
tomers, Boeing has delayed the 
launching of its advanced technology 
7J7 jediner by about a year. 

Boeing's commercial airplane 
division decided last week to delay 
until 1993 the initial deliveries of the 
proposed twin-engine airliner, which 
is seen by the company as the logical 
successor to the aging 727 . The com- 
pany had been talking to airlines 
about deliveries beginning in 1992. 

While Boeing's decision was not a 
big surprise to Wall Street analysts, 
investors apparendy liked the news 



and pushed Boeing's stock up VA to 
close at 53'/* on a day when the Dow 
Jones industrial average dropped 
more than 12 points. 

Analysts said the delay would 
allow Boeing to defer next year's 
anticipated increases in research and 
development costs on the aircraft, 
with the company's bottom line ben- 
efitting accordingly. 

"It's a belated admission by Boe- 
ing that the market is not quite ready 
yet (for the 7J7) despite Boeing's 
most persistent efforts," said Howard 
Rubel, an analyst for Cyrus J. 
Lawrence. 

While Boeing has been talking pri- 
marily in terms of a 1 50- seal plane. 



American Airlines, for one, has 
expressed interest in an aircraft in the 
165-170-seat range. Scandinavian 
Airlines System, another possible 
customer, is looking for a plane in the 
140-seat size, however. 

With fuel prices still relatively low 
and the new propfan engines that will 
power the 7J7 still under develop- 
ment and unproven, Boeing officials 
also acknowledged that the overall 
market does not appear ready for the 
aircraft. 

It has been estimated that it would 
will cost $4 billion to get the plane 
into production. In part to help spread 
the costs, Boeing has taken on a con- 
sortium of Japanese companies. 



Forum debates waste compact 



By The Associated Press 

GARNETT, Kan. — The benefit 
to Kansas of a five-state compact for 
the disposal and storage of low-level 
radioactive wastes was debated at a 
community meeting in Gamett Mon- 
day night 

The four panelists agreed that 
something has to be done now to 
handle radioactive wastes — an issue 
that has been put off for 20 years — 
but disagreed on the value of Kansas' 
participation in the compact with 
Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma and 
Nebraska. 

Stanley Grant, director of the Kan- 
sas Department of Health and Envi- 
ronment, and James Power Jr., a 
hydrologist in charge of the environ- 
mental division of that department, 
argued that the five-state compact is 
in the best interest of Kansas. 

Grant also said it is possible the 
Central Stales Region Compact 
might never build a waste storage 



facility because the five member 
states generate about 3 percent of the 
nation's low-level waste. Because 
the amount is so small, he said, the 
central compact could merge with 
another compact that wants to make 
its site more economically feasible. 

"That's a possibility and certainly 
one we're looking at," Grant said. 

Laura Mcnhusen of Jewell, presi- 
dent of the Kansas Coalition on 
Nuclear Waste, and Dave Ebbert, a 
Quinter farmer who belongs to the 
coalition, suggested Kansas with- 
draw from the compact and handle its 
own wastes. 

Mcnhusen said the central com- 
pact is the worst in the nation because 
it gives away two important aspects 
of site development to the commer- 
cial developer — the selection of a 
host state and the selection of a site. 

Ebbert said that when the compact 
was formed four years ago is seemed 
best for Kansas to participate 



because it was the lowest producer of 
low-level radioactive wastes among 
the five states. Since then, he said. 
Wolf Creek has become operative 
and Kansas has jumped to the top of 
the list. The switch would make it 
easier for other states to claim Kan- 
sas should handle all the wastes, he 
said. 

The meeting in Gamett was the 
result of a request from the Anderson 
County Commission for more infor- 
mation about a low- level radioactive 
waste dump. 

An invitation for the meeting was 
made when Gov. Mike Hayden and 
state officials met with leaders of 
southeast Kansas counties in Bur- 
lington to discuss aspects of a possi- 
ble site. That was after the Kansas 
Geological Survey identified certain 
areas with shale deemed appropriate 
for a waste site, including much of 
Anderson County and other counties 
in the Wolf Creek Nuclear Plant area. 



THE LADS; A contemporary quartet that deliver* 
a perfected mixture of warm vocal harmonic! . 
The Lads: Doug Olson. Jeff Bergen. Larry Turner 
and Dave Scrogglns. are unequalled tn their 
vocal and Instrumental capabilities and their 
onstage communicative skills. They reminisce 
with old hymns, present the newest In 
contemporary, flow with mellow middle of- road 
and minister to all ages. THE LADS will be at 
Crestvtew Christian Church on August 30 at 
7:30 p.m. Crcstview Is located north of 
Manhattan at 4301 Tutlle Creek Blvd. (across 
from the Tutlle Creek River Pond Area) For futher 
information call 776 3796 No Admission. LOVE 
offering will be received. 




G00DS0N AUTO TRIM 

Complete Auto, Truck & Boat Upholstery 
•Tailor Made Seat Covers 
•Boat Covers 
•Tanneau Covers 
•Convertible Tops 
•Vinyl Tops 
•We Now Do Window Tinting! 

201 Sarber Lane 

(behind Wal-Mart) 

Phone 776-7679 Res. 776-7614 



WALLOON 
BOUTIQUE 

Manhattan's 
Balloon 
Experts 

Here to serve you 

at our new 
and larger location 

401 n. 3rd St. 

We offer unique balloon arrangements, 

plants and many MEW and EXCITING 

handmade items. 

Hours: Mon.-Sat. 8:30-5 




539-0106 
We Deliver! 



LUTHERAN 
CAMPUS 
MINISTRY 

Invites you 



^ 



k\ 




WORSHIP 

Sundays 11 a.m. 

Danforth Chapel (Small Chapel on campus) 
Holy, Communion-Contemporary Liturgies 
Eiible Study: 9'A5 a.m. Sun.-Danforth 

FRIENDSHIP 

LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT 
Sundays 5 p.m. -Lutheran Student Center, 

1021 Denison 
Cost Supper 
VCR Night-Sanctuary-Apartheid-Faii Retreat 

Bible Study-Relationships 
Lutheran Campus Ministry- 1021 
Denison, 539-4451, Don Fallon, 
yj Campus Pastor 



MMUK um*n«i owich t Anewc* 



"N 




V, 



We've Remodeled! 

Come out and see our new store. 

Now 4,000 sq. ft. with the largest 

selection of fine wines, champagnes 

and domestic and imported beers. 

• Discounts on cases 

• Cold kegs in stock 

• Largest cooler in area 

2223 Tuttle Creek Blvd. 776-5003 

(next to Hop-n-Skip #2) 



Collegian Classified Advertising 

CLASSIFIED AD FORMS 

Write your ad in the form provided below, and mail it in, along with the correct payment, to STUDENT PUBLICATIONS, INC. . 
KEDZIE HALL, ROOM 103, KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY, MANHATTAN, KANSAS 66506 You can also stop by Kedzie 
103 to place your ad or call 532 6555 Student Publications now accepts MasterCard and Visa (Minimum charge of $5 ) 
The DEAPLINE for Classified Ads is NOON the day before publication; NOON Friday tor Mondays publication Deadline for 
cancellation is NOON the day before publication 

CLASSIFIED AD POLICY 

* Only »ie FIRST TWO words of each ad will be in all caps, all other words will be in caps/tower, except initials 

* No abbreviations, please 

* No last names or phone numbers will be printed in the Personals section 

' Student Publications will not be responsible for more than one wrong classified insertion It is the advertiser's responsibility to 
contact the paper if an error exists No adjustment will be made if the error does not alter the value ot the ad 

* Items found ON CAMPUS can be advertised FREE for a period not exceeding three days They can be placed at Kedzie 103 
or by calling 532-6555 

* If mailed ads do not arrive by the Noon deadline, they will be placed in the next day's paper 

* Ads which are incorrectly calculated will be run only for amount paid 

* The Collegian reserves the right to edit or reject any advertisement at any time 

Classified Ad Rates Classified Categories 



Warda/Oay 
1-11 
1* 
IT 
It 
11 
10 
11 
11 
13 
14 
II 

M 

17 
11 
11 

30 
Ov»r 30 wordi 



I 

2.1* 
2.40 
US 

270 
21* 

3.00 
3.1 S 

330 
3.4S 
3.10 
3.TS 
3.10 
4.01 
4.10 
4.31 
4.10 



2 
3.1S 

3. 48 
3.8S 

l.SS 
4.0S 
4. IS 
4.4S 
4. SB 
4. SB 
I.0B 
S.2S 
S.48 
1.09 
S.IS 
1. 01 
4.3 5 



1 


4 


1 


Exira Oayl 


4.00 


450 


4.T1 


1.00 


4.11 


4.M 


1.10 


1.01 


4.50 


1.10 


I.4S 


MO 


4,71 


1.40 


i.to 


1.11 


S.00 


1.70 


LIS 


1.20 


S.ZS 


0.00 


t.90 


1.19 


5. so 


1.10 


1.19 


1.30 


S.7S 


•.to 


7.20 


1.39 


0.00 


t.M 


7.55 


1.40 


0.2S 


7, SO 


7.10 


Ml 


o.so 


T.S0 


1.29 


1.50 


a. 75 


7.10 


t.to 


l.SS 


7.00 


S.10 


t.tl 


1,90 


7.2S 


0.40 


* 30 


1.11 


7.10 


t.70 


t.tl 


1.70 


7.7S 


t.oo 


10.00 


1.71 



01 
01 
03 
04 
OS 
OS 
07 
08 
00 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 



Announcamanu 

Apartmwti to Roll — FumWiad 

Apanmanti to Aani — Unhimahad 

AulorTBbilM 10( SD* 

Auiomoo* Raniaa 

Card of TnanM 

Child Car* 

Corpuiar* 



Financial Samoa* 

Garag* and Yard Sam 

Houtm and Mum* noma* to Rant 

H0U44* and MoM* Honaa to Saa> 

lotl and found 



IS 
It 
17 
IB 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
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27 

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Msoaianaout Marcnandtw 

MoarcytaavBcyeaw to Sal* 

Muiical hitrumsnt* 

Paraonaft 

Pati and Pal Suppaat 

PrgtaaitonaJ Sarvioa* 



fWaum* Typing Samoa* 
RoorranM Waniad 
S)u*hon Wantarf 

SpOftinQ^BtfaaMnaJ tajuajfflant 
SutHaasa 



Olhaf 



ClMsifted Mall Order Form 

Name 



Phone no.. 



Address 



_ Student ID #. 



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21. 
26. 



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.Amount paid. 



Total days in papef Category 



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■*— MMflMtm*! 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Wednesday, August 28, 1W7 



23 



Kedzie 103 



ClassAds 



532-6555 



CLASSIFIED RATES 
On* day: 1 S word* or tawar, $2. 25, 15 
cants par word over 1S> Two conaacu- 
Hv* days: 15 words or lawar, S3. 25, 20 
cants par word over 15; Thra« cons acu- 
llva days: 15 words or fawar. (4-00, 25 
emit par word ovar 15; Four consacu 
ttvt days: 15 word* or tawar, $4.50, 30 
cants par word over 1 5; Five cortsecu 
live days: 1 5 words or tawar, $4.75, 35 
cants par word over 15. 

C lain tied* in payable in advance unless cli- 
ent dm »n established Account with Student Publ' 
cat Ion a 

Deadline la noon the day before publication, 
noon FRIDAY FOR Monday s paper 

Student Publication* will nol be responsible 
10' mot I n an ona wrong classified I n aertlon 1 1 1 1 1 h e 
advertiser's responsibility 10 contact lha paper >' an 
error exists No sdiustment will be made if lha error 
does not altet the value of thi ad 

Hams found ON CAMPUS can be wvimiig 
FREE lor a period not exceeding three days They 
can be placed at Keone 103 or by caning 532-6555 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



01 



MARY KAY Coimelics-Skin cart— glemour prod' 
ucii Free facial, can Fiona Taylor. 5392070 Hand 
icapped accessible [ 1 -751 

FLYING INTEREST you 7 For inlormation on K Stale 
Flying Club call Hugh mm. 532-6311 or 339-3176 
tllll 

HOLLYWOOD'S BEST Gat your Cinemagic Video 
coupon Boohs irom joy, 7713-5494. belore 9 p.m. {1 ■ 
9t 



Enjoy Our Weekly 
Buffet Specials 

11:30 a.m. -2 p.m. 
M— Texas Western BBQ 
T —Italian 
W-Oriental$y|95 

U —Mexican "-J 
F — Cajun 

includes salad bar 



or call for carry-out 



Wt 



Unh«rsity 1 Y r Club 

17th & Anderson, 539-7531 

Rubes® 



e-jjg Spuds Mackenzie 

CCTYCM w Night 

(^MUflTJ • 75' Bud Light draws 
• 50* Loaded Spudj 

The Party's Not Over! 



WANTED— lOOoverwelgh I people lo try newchoco 
lata, vanilla.. and »lr*wberry herbal weight control 
program No drugs no exercise Doctor approved. 
1 00 % g u aremeed MasterCard and V i ta ac cepted 
CellT7».5114or 7761465 (130) 

110(360 WEEKLYrUo Mailing Circular*! No 
quotasfbosses Inlormaiion Rush self add re seed 
envelope CM/NA-COE POLB 7730 Rock lord. IL 
Bile*. (MS} 



tfrLee ^Levi's 

^-Wrangler Jeans 

^Justin 

#Dan Post 

^Abilene Boots 

^Stetson 

AResistol Hats 

^-Levi's Jean Jackets 

#Karman 

^Panhandle 

Slim Shirts 

2 mi. east of K-Mart 

Hwy. 24 

Manhattan, Kan. 66502 

776-6715 

Mon.-Sat. 9-5:30 

Thurs, 9-8:30 



By Leigh Rubin 



THE FONE Crisis Canter will be holding volunteer 
t r a i n i n g A ug 29 and 30 1 n Un ion 2 1 3 A 1 1 1 n re re J led 
persons are encouraged lo call 5324565 lo regis 

ter it 51 

OPEN AIR food and cralt lair in Aggieville Oct 10 
For inlormaiion on booihs write Boa 160* in Man 
hstian by Sept 25 <2-19, 

ASK ME about Mary Key Cosmetic*' Janal Milliken 
5399469 ,2.j 7) 

KRYSTALLOS- BEAUTIFUL Objects Irom Earth 
Thursday- Sunday. 10 30 am -6 pm . Highway 24 
East 539-0360 1 31 



FREE 

Hors d'oeuvres 
10 p.m.-Midnight 
Monday-Thursday 



V?. 




Univ^rsity^Y^Club 

17th & Anderson, 539-7531 

JOIN IN me lun ai Ogden* Fill Festival -Saturday. 
Aug 29 Parade— 1 1 em . bed races— 1 p m . tug 
olwer-1 30 pm dinner— 4 p m .street dance— 7 
p m Call 5394317 lor inlormaiion (34)1 



APABTMENTS FOB BEH'-FUBHUHEO 92 

TWO BEDROOM basement apartment lor rent Fully 
lurmshed 1250 Renter pays water and electric 
S37-3224 (1 S) 

THREE BEDROOM, utitilies mostly paid No pets, 
waierbeds 539*056 Monday. Wednesday Friday 
mornings, or (91 31 494 2633 (1-5) 

FREE RENT lest month ol yearly lease Ten or twelve 
month lease Available in August No pets 537 
8369 (2111 

NICE TWObedroom duplex, gas, air. carpeted, tree 
lor August Telephone 5377334 12 5) 

ONE BEDROOM nicely furnished basement apert 
ment. one hall block to campus Laundry end ca 
bie TV. 1190 plus utilities Preier female, upper 
class, n on- smoker Call 539 1636 altar 5pm (3-5) 

APABTMENTS FOU HENT-UNFUBHISHiB 03 

F REE RENT last month ol yearly lease Tan or twelve 
month lease Available in Auguil No pets 537 
6389. (2111 

AUTOMOBILE* FOB SALE JT 

1978 PONTIAC Firebird. Mop tour-speed 14.000 
miles on rebuilt engine Call 5394134 evenings (1 ■ 
51 

1961 DATSUN 2B0ZX turbo, limited edition. Tlop 
leather, en lull power, stereo, 53991 31 (2-6 1 

19 r6 DODGE Aspen wagon Air conditioned, power 
steering/brakes low mileage, runs well 1500 or 
best oiler 5394)202 or 5324642 l2*i 

1949 CHEVROLET one ton truck, good tires De- 
pendable Include hoist, extra parts 776-9746 eerly 
or late 1 24)) 

1961 VW Rabbit dlesei. air conditioned 5 speed, en 
eel lent condition $2,800 Cell 776 1505 (3-5 1 

1 969 VW Bus. 1400. mechanics end body better then 
price 308 N I5lh 539-1956 i3-7» 

1979 DATSUN 280ZX. 5 speed air conditioned new 
paint Must sell 776 9188 evenings (37) 



CHILD CARE 



07 



• t 



CHILD CARE -Teacher n« openings in Day Cane 
home near Norfflylew school Nutritious meals 
Klivitieajaf/Jjtfjtje. licensed 1 1 51 



PART TIME SITTER needed tor lour children ages 5 
5, 3. i Dependable responsible own transports 
Hon necessary Relerences experience prelerrsd 
539-1521 0-31 

LIVE-IN SITTER Single parent need* alter school' 
evening cars Boy 9- girl 6 Free rent, utilities, 
meals Conveniences washer-dryer, microwave 
cable VCR Two blocks Irom campus Call Pet 
539-0437 (24j| 

RESPONSIBLE BABYSITTER needed to watch ener 
getic 4 vi year-old bay Monday Wednesday and 
Friday or Tuetday lor a lew hours Need own trans 
portation Call Sue at 537 1103 (2 31 

BABYSITTER FOR two toddlers, tumble evening 
hours, transportation necessary Kim 539-2407 (3' 
41 



EM*L0YMEN1 



09 



That's htm officer, he's the one who killed my garden 
never torget those beady little eyes 1 " 



I'll 



PLAN NOW lor next summer s employment 1 Enroll 
in Community Education's Advanced Lrfeeavmg 
Class The class starts Monday, Aug 31 Theciess 
meets on Monday and Wednesday until Oct 19 
The class begins at 5 30 pm and ends at 7 15 pm 
at the KSU natalonum This course ia required 
lor the Water Safety Instructor Course For more 
inlormaiion can Community Education at 532 
5570 and to register cell 532 5566 13-51 



Bloom County 



By Becke Breathed 



Oc/H R6HT. 

yes. you me 

TOW 




mp ves~ m whan 
ax? vNFnmmmLY 
pfacsm in its mexwe 
coMfUxm fft/r r 
jtMrpWT&e #WrT 
mose wo facts mm 

IQCVWrmeACH 
, OfWH 




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v, aw *■ i 



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I! SHfiKt >n 
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Garfield 



By Jim Davis 







GRILL COOKS needed days or evenings Apply in 
person. Bobby Ts 3240 Kimball, across Irom Clco 
Park (1-5) 

ACA DEMICSERVICESCoordinatorDevelopendco- 
ordlnele academic assistance component lor high 
school students; teaching experience with high 
school students Irom diverse environments es- 
sential: B S required. MS prelerrsd in education, 
counseling, child development or related held 
f 19.000 Job description available upon request 
(phone 9)3(5324)4971 Send letter ol intent, re- 
sume, and names/phone numbers of three refer, 
ences by Aug 28. 1967, lo Director. Upward Sound 
Program 202 Molt on Hail Kansas Slate University. 
Manhattan KS 66506 KSU ia AA/EOE n-3) 

NOW HIRING Pan lime evening and weekend grill 
cooks 10-20 hoursJweek. Apply m person 111 
South 4th. The Chel Cafe 11-101 

DATA ENTRY Operator Student Assistant - Pre- 
Admissions Unit Up lo 20 hours per week through 
December Mull be available in two or mora hour 
time blocks Possible continued employment 
through spring semester at reduced hours Re- 
quires accuracy, reliability, lamiiienty with cbm- 
pulers and office procedures Selection criteria 
will Include GPA. prior related computer experi- 
ence and longevity Sterling salary 13 35 per hour 
Applications available in Anderson Hall Rm 119 
Closing date Aug 28 EOE |t-5) 

STUDENT RECEPTIONIST Administrative User Ser- 
vices is seeking a triendty energetic student lor a 
variety ot duties including, receiving visitors an. 
swenng the telephone, copying, tiling typing, and 
word processing Up Id 30 hours per week possi- 
ble Hours available, commu meal ions skills, and 
typing skills will be used to evaluate applicants 
Contact Debbie Hyde, Anderson 21. 5324)261 by 
Sept 1st to apply il 3) 

STUDENT PROGRAMMERS Administrative User 
Services Is recruiting to lill two student program- 
mer positions starting immediately Programming 
experience with COBOL and OSfJCL in an IBM 
4381 MVS environment required Positions involve 
administrative application* programming Appli- 
cable experience, grade point average, and longev- 
ity potential wilt be used to evaluate applicants 
Contact Debbie Hyde. Anderson 21 5324)261 by 
Sept tat to apply (1-31 

KANSAS CAREERS needs a student with excep- 
tional word processing and clencai skills lo work 
alternoona starting Sept i Obese 3 skills preier 
red Submit application, teller, resume end refer 
ences by Aug 28 lo Kansas Careers. Feirchitd Halt 
304 Kansas State University Manhattan Kansas 
66506 Kansas State University is an Equal Oppor 
lunlly Employer ft 51 

PART TIME WORK lull lime pay 1 ' ' Christmas Around 
The World needs erea demonstrators 1 Seasonal 
Your own hour* No cash investment, collecting, 
or delivery Pali 1 238-5429 Adele 539-2930 or Terry 
537-394B (f-101 

HAVE FUN and make money loo. with Avon 539- 
1936 11-51 

LUNCHROOM PLAYGROUND Supervisors l'Tlo? 
hours per day Ham to 1 p m 13 87 per hour Ap- 
ply to USD 4363. 2031 Poynt; Manhattan. KS 
66502 913-537-2400 EOE (2 8) 

GIRL FRIDAY 16-20 hours'week normally. 5-6 15 
pm mandatory, olher hours your schedule Own 
tran* port at ion. relerences Evening meal prepare 
lion, and some child care Call after 6 30 p m eve 
mngs. weekend* 776 5552 124)1 

SCHOOL BUS Drivers beginning immediately $4 75 
per hour, must be 2t years ol age. have a good driv- 
ing record and complete a training program Bus 
driving experience nol required Hour* 6 30 I o 
8 30 a m and 2 40 to 430 p m Job description 
available Apply to USD *363. 2031 PoynU Ave , 
Manhattan. Kansas 66502. 913-537 2400 EOE (2-8) 

UNIQUE WOMEN 5 store opening October in Man 
haltan Fult-tima manager needed, retail eipen 
ence preferred Submit resumes to Box 6. "i. Cone 
gian |2 5) 

VALENTINO S i!j now hiring piBi preparation tor day 
end nighttime help Apply at 30t9 Anderson Irom 
2 45 to 4 p m on Wednesday |2 31 

VALENTINO'S 15 now hiring waiteit wait resist end 
hoileaeel tor day and nighttime help Apply at 
3019 Anderson Irom 2 45 to 4 p m on Wednesday 
I! 31 

LIBERAL MAiO- 'companion needed weekdays to 
keephouse and care lo r hand ic ap ped husband .42. 
with broken leg Call 776-6584 between 1 and 8 
pm (24) 



RE NT WAY 

3012 Andrtvun Ave and 419 I- Riym/ 

w'c an* kmiirirj lit part Lrrc Trip. 

W,xjrj.<vpi D|i i film, but nk rMSM$, 

Mnii be wit in ippciftnur and like Id rmv; people 

Apply in person n (mirr »>ie*. 



RESEARCH SUBJECTS Needed US cilnansaged 
20-60 are needed lor a comfort study on maltres 
ses during September and October 160 per per 
son Sign up el Institute lor Environmental Re- 
search, center back ot Sealon Hall 13-5) 

NOW TAKING applications tor barfenden, wait 
raises, due tockeys and door person. Apply In per 
■on Ask lor Doug or Betty at the Dougout (3-5) 

HARDEE S IN Aggieville is taking applications lor 
delivery drivers Must have dependable cai and in- 
surance Hours flexible, nights and weekends i3- 
71 

EDITORIAL ASSISTANTS- Part time iiudent assis- 
tant* to write, edit and produce manuals and olher 
user documentation lor microcomputer software 
Solid command of spelling, grammar and clear 
willing skills in English essential Editing expert, 
ence and ability to use electronic word process- 
ing, especieiiy WordStar, desirable For applica- 
tion torm call al the Computer System* OH ice. 
211 Umberger Hall (3*7) 

HOUSES HMO M0I1U HOWES FOB BENT "IT 

THREE BEDROOM, lurmshed, will accommodate 
three itudents. Two bathroom*, TV room, no pel*, 
no children *375 plus uliiitiei. one year lease, or 
10month tease 539-8606 (itll 

MULTI BEDROOM HOUSE, stove, refrigerator, cen- 
tral air. fireplace, laundry hookups, garage Call 
537 8389 Itll) 



RENT OR sell Rent negotiable un lurmshed, slave 
end refrigerator, washendryer connections, child 
or imail cat ok Call 7634366 or 776 2230 1 13) 

THREE BEDROOMS Next 10 campus clem stove, 
refrigerator gas heal water, trash paid couples, 
no pets. 539-3609 (241 

ADULT COURT for serious students One . two 
three-bedroom, very reasonable quiet location 
near campus no pels 537 8389 (311) 

ST FRANCIS house residence space available, short 
block ofl campus 1135/month single room, 
shered kitchen Call 537 0593 leave message 13-7) 

HOUSES AND MOIIIE HOWES FOB SALE ~7T 

1975—2 bedroom, 14 * 70 mobile home at Walnut 
Grove Appliances central air New deck with awn 
i ng. chain-link fenced yard storage shed, carpels 
(new throughout) Wallpapered redecorated i 
month ago 494-2720 11-51 

1984 AMERICAN Mobile Home. 14 x 60, two 
bedroom, centra) airrheal located at Colonial Gar 
dens Lot 332. very clean, book value! 13,000 mike 
oiler' 182 3311 or 482 3523 1 151 

KS PARENTSfttudenl* Don't walla money renting 
Buy and recover your investment at re-sale or lax 
lime Beautiful one- year old three bedroom, two- 
bath mobile home Fully furnished, all appliances 
539 71 19 or 537-0104 II 5| 

MOBILE HOME, 60 x 12, 64,500, NoHhview Call after 
6 pm. 539-3862 13-4) 



LOST AN0 FOUND 



H 



MISCELLANEOUS MERCHANDISE 



IS 




M0N.-FRI. 10-5 



DRAFTING TABLE 31 ■ x 42" with parallel bar porta 
bis. lit* on desk top real nice' Rob. 5324078 Ask 
ing!35 12 5 1 

SANYO REFRIGERATOR. 3 5 cubic feet, good shape. 
$70 Or beat oiler Call 776 7537 alter 5 30 p m i37i 

DORM8UNK8EO lor sale Mas carpted ladder Besi 
otler Call 5397465 alter 4pm (34)) 




Buy a Student 

Semester or Year 

Membership 

and receive 

5 FREE 

TANNING SESSIONS 

The Candlewood Center 

3236 Kimball 
776-1750 

ofler expires Sept. 1, 1987 



TWO ROOM site pieces carpel and pad. S20 each, 
you haul Complete darkroom equipment 539 
3923 r3-5i 



MOTOBCrCLES/BICTUES FOR SALE 



It 



M1YATA RACING bike. 58cm. good condition, sun 
tour component 1350 Call 5395825 (241) 

YAMAHA DT400 Endure Excellent condition $460. 
extras 494-2756. 124)) 



1964 HONDA 250 XLR Bought new in 1985. excellent 
condition low mileage. $700 or best oiler 13 51 

1SS1 KAWASAKI KL250 street legal Enduro Good 
condition $425li rm Can Bill 539-9023. leave mes- 
sage 1 3 5 1 



•EBSONALS 



II 



FOUND MALE puppy, approximately six months 
old. short blonde hair Found in Shop Qui k parking 
lot across Irom Good now 537 1096 i2-4i 



JEANNIE WITTE Jeanme Witte. Jeannie Wilts 
Jeanme Witte. Jeannie Witte Jeannie Wllte Now 
that s a cold prickly Love. Dick 13) 

WOMEN OF KSU — The men ol Den a Up si Ion cor 
dially mviie you lo a Little Sister cocktail petty 
Thursday evening beginning al 5 p m (3) 

CHI O Pledges Your lirsi day al school we hope was 
lusl great Forty-eight new pledges lo know — we 
s im pi y c an' t wai I Get payc ned to r you r pi edgesni p 
'cause the tun has just begun, and remember the 
active* think you're number onel Love f*. the Ac- 
tives (31 

SHELLY— DON T lorgei to show up lor the speech 
team s insi meeting ihis alternoon at 3 30 in 3) i 
Nichols Gel psyched tor the road trips Mark. (31 

ATTENTION WOMEN ol KSU- You are cordially in 
viied to the annual Kappa Sigma Invitational Put 
ling Classic The good limes start at 7 p m Friday 
at the Kappa Sigma house and continue on to the 
16ihho!ewheredancingandtunwi11behedbyati 
Rides and into available et 539-9023 Coma see 
why Kappa Sig* have more tun 1 (3) 

"professional services n 

PROMPT ABORTION and contraceptive services in 
Lewrence 9136415716 rltti 

PREGNANT? BIRTHRIGHT can help Frse preg- 
nancy tesi Confidential Call 537-9160 103 S 
Fourth St Suite 25 Mill 



SEVEN PIECE wood framed furniture set (sola, 
chairs, end tables). $200 Phone 776-831 3 1 1 3i 

TWO STUDENT sue matching desks, one with chair 
$25 and $35 Phone 539*875 between 5-7 p m ft 31 



^Uvcfc llou.se of 'Music 

DOD Guitar Effects 

30% Off 

327 Poyntz 776-7983 



FOR SALE AMJFM cabinet stereo great sound, 
good condilion Call Chris or Dave. 539-8656 113) 

ALVAREZ GUITAR Like new ITS Call 539-2446 12-31 

FOR SALE — Super single walerbed. plywood post 
construction. healer $50 Call 776-7511 alier6pm 
12-51 



CLOTHES WITH CLASS 



RENTALS 



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SUPPLIES PRINTEH typewriter Rental typewriters 
available, correcting and non -cor reeling. Hull 
Business Machines. 715 North 12!n Aggieville. 
5397931 11111 



RESUME/TYPING SERVICE 



22 



PAPERS RESUMES, cover letters, theses and di* 
serrations entered, stored and completed to your 
specifications Letter quality printer Come see 
us floss Secretarial Services 614 N. 121hlacross 
Irom Kites) 5395147 |1 5) 

ARE YOU prepared lor interviews? Cell Resume Ser 
vice tor your resume, mta sheet or cover tetter 
needs 1211 Moro 537 7294 13 5) 



ROOMMATE WANTED 



23 



ROOMMATE NEEDED desperately- Own room 
plus lots ol extras Very nice— Winston Place. 
$170 plus utitilies Bar'jara 539 7464 it 3) 

ROOM AND board lor male will do laundry Call 494 
6249 it5l 

ROOMMATEiS) NEEDEO lo snare five-bedroom 
house $100 to $150 a montn plus utilities Russ 
Steve 45258)4 leave message |2 5i 

WANTED ROOMMATE lo snare two bedroom apart- 
ment $165 per mom h plus one- hail bills Call 776- 
0124 (2 51 

FEMALE. NON SMOKING cheap rent transport! 
lion helpful Call evenings, 539 2205 or 776-5608. 
ask lor Dawn (3-7i 

ROOMMATE WANTED Own room, washer and dryer, 
close lo campus. $135 Call 776 7905 13 51 

OPENING FOR I wo people at 1230 Vainer, directly 
across street irom campus it35imonth Inquire at 
location (3-7) 

ONE OR two non-smoking lemale lo share larm- 
house Preier vet or animal science majors Free 
stall and pasture for horse, cow. dog Beet, eggs, 
firewood, ski boat lurmshed 778 1205. 8-10 p m 
only |3 7i 

NON SMOKING FEMALE lo share luxury home on 
West side $195 plus utilities 537-0550 Ask tor 
Diane 776-5602 alter 5pm |3 5) 



SITUATION WANTED 



» 



FREE ROOM and board tn exchange lor daytime ba- 
bysitting Female, non-smoker preferred Call 776 
3138 13-111 

PAY DAY' Apply now lor sludent positions (all shtlls, 
all hours) Including ice cream. Mexican, piua. 
cook, baker, waiter, waitress and morel Bring in 
your tall class schedule today and till out applica- 
tion in K State Union tood service olitce Ws oiler 
student pay plan job variety, and centrally located 
work place where you work wilh other sludent* 
We require that you must be honest, reliable end 
display a sense ol urgency, musl be clean, neat 
and wear appropriate attire We preier to hire work 
sludy students and students who are eligible to 
work 30 hours pet week Food Handlers card a 
must (3 10) 

WANTED dASS player lor local rock/dance band 
Good vocal range also prelerrsd Call Michael or 
Devest 537 1770 13-71 

PROGRAMMER POSITIONS available The Kansas 
Cooperative Extension Service has openings for 
several student computer programmers Work 
schedules can be arranged around class times 
Applicants should be laminar wilh one ol Ihe fol- 
lowing languages Pascal. C, Cobol or Assembler 
For more information, contact Mary Knapp or 
Shern Thompson Computer Systems Ollice 
Room 211 Umberger Phone 532-7019 Applies 
lions are available irom ihe above individuals or in 
Ihe Computer Science Ollice Applications will be 
accepted through Sept to 1987 (3 12) 



SPORTING/RECBEATIONAL EQUIPMENT 



25 



YOU CAN have your own boat by this weekend (or buy 
shares with triends) 15 foot ba)a ski boar. 105 
horsepower Chrysler outboard, fully equipped 
ready lo go 776-6938 (3-5) 

OUT-OF-shape lemale grid sludent looking lor 
someone in like condition to exercise with. Let's 
motivate each other' Call 776 1637 |3-4| 



OTHER 



21 



ANYONE ELSE biking the MS 150' I need a fill 
Yvetle. 532-5902 (}5) 



Crossword 



By Eugene Sheffer 



Peanuts 



By Charles Schulz 



U)HV ARE YOU STAMPING 
MERE IN THE RAIN, 
CHARLIE 6R0WN? ITS 
NOT 601 N6 TO 5T0P... 




this 15 one of those 
All pay rains. .we'll 
never finish the same. 

SO WHY ARE MtW STANPIN6 
HERE IN THE RAlN ? 





ACROSS 

I Garden 

plot 
4 Garden 

building 
8 — Scott 

Decision 

12 Author 
IxFvin 

13 Staff 

14 1 >»■'*' i i<l 

15 Famed wee 
fellow 

17 Enter 
tainer 
Adams 

18 Spots 

19 Cry of 
discovery 

21 "Where the 
Hoys — " 

22 Drum type 
26 Strike's 

kin 

29 P- 1«. e*.|t. 

30 Kctnm 

(iardner 

31 Mum i ;tl 
end inn 

:)2 < m in 
holder 

33 Lrifil dad 

34 In the 
slyle of 

35 t hemisi \ 
workplace 



36 Skate 
part 

37 Gamine 

39 Ahrade 

40 Sigmoid 
shape 

41 Perfumes 
45 Carnival 
48 Hero of 

boy's 
books 

50 Friend 

51 Single 
component 

52 Airline 

Wilt I'll I ll:i> 

53 Archer 
of note 

Solution time: 25 mine,. 

Tsl 



54 One of the 
Trumans 

56 Make 
schnitzel 
DOWN 

1 Use one's 
incisors 

2 Cupid 

3 Moist 

4 Orb 

5 Aluxlr 

6 Shade 
source 

7 Engaged in 
forensics 

8 Fantasy 

9 Ablush 
10 Yale 

student 




Yesterday'-* anawer 



5-30 



11 Color 
16 Crownlet 
20 Scalding 

23 Scarlett's 
home 

24 Poet of 
antiquity 

25 Spiked 
club 

26 Sing a 
la Ella 

27 Equine 
sport 

28 Early 
evictee 

29 Chore 

32 (heck 
remnant 

33 t Jive a jab 

35 — Alamos 

36 Explodes M 

38 Hard — 
gemsione w 

39 Harold of L 
"Ghost 
busters" 

42 Offend 

43 Al a 
distance 

44 Remain 

45 Stout 

46 Stout 

47 " - He 
Kkh* 

49 Single 
1 1 m 




T g K B G I) E 

il g x g c 



y app a p p 

Ycaterday'e Cryptoqnlp: OCR IDLE, UNSKILLED 
GARDENER HAS ADMITTED, "I'M ONLY KILLING 
THYME," 

Today's Cryptouulp clue: A equals B 



•■K 



**VM 



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www 



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V 




Winning Attitude 

The K-State cheerleading 
squad placed In two of three 
categories at its summer 
camp in Memphis, Tenn. See 
Page 13. 



Weather 



Cloudy Thursday morning with a 30 
percent chance of showers, partly 
cloudy by afternoon with high in 
low to mid-70s. Mostly clear Thurs- 
day night, low mid-50s. 




i!2 

9/» ** is 

- , ; . ■ L s . ■ a . 

i j Newspaper Sect 'n 
y*st : 
l*a, KS 66612 



Hall Hook-up 



An agreement reached between Manhattan Cable 
TV Services Inc. and the Department of Housing allows 
the cable system to install hook-ups in residence hall 
rooms. See Page 3. 



Thursday 

August 27, 1987 



Kansas State University 

Manhattan. Kansas 66506 

Volume 94. Number 4 



Kansas State 



Collegian 



Big money chances 
soon to commence 
with state lottery 



By Jodi Swenyel 
Staff Writer 



Kansans will soon have the chance 
to win "big money" by playing the 
Kansas Lottery. The game has three 
potential starting dates — Sept. 28, 
Oct 1 2 and Oct. 27, said Larry Mont- 
gomery, director of the Lottery 
Commission. 

Doubts were raised about the star- 
tup of an instant winner game this fall 
because of the time required for the 
security checks on employees by the 
Kansas Bureau of Investigation. 




H- said '.he lottery could not be 
ready; however, in time for tickets to 
be sold at the Kansas State Fair in 
Hutchinson in early September, 
although many western Kansas legi- 
slators have pushed for it 

The price of a lottery ticket will be 
$1. The winnings are structured in 
three prize levels or "tiers," The first 
tier includes prizes from a free lottery 
ticket up to $25. Ticket winners of 
$25.01 up to S 100 are included in the 
second tier, and winnings of between 
$100.01 and $5,000 are in the highest 
level. 

"The money paid to the winners 
comes from the lottery prize fund," 



Montgomery said. 

Winners in the first tier can 
redeem their prizes instantly from the 
place the ticket was purchased, 
Montgomery said. Other winners 
will need to mail their ticket to the 
tottery headquarters in Topeka to 
obtain their prize. 

Nancy Zogleman, director of 
public information for the Kansas 
Lottery, said more than 1,200 Kansas 
retailers have made an application to 
sell the lottery tickets. She said they 
are aiming for 2.000 to 4,000 retail- 
ers before the fust game in October. 

Retailers can buy a book of 300 
tickets for $165. The retailers make 5 
percent profit on any tickets that are 
sold. Montgomery said nine work- 
shops are scheduled across the state 
for retailers who want to learn about 
lottery ticket sales. 

"A retail application workshop is 
scheduled in Junction City on Sept. 3 
for retailers interested in selling lot- 
tery tickets in this area of the state," 
he said. 

The money earned by the Kansas 
Lottery from ticket sales is broken 
down into different areas. For every 
$1 ticket sold, 45 cents goes into the 
prize fund and 25 cents goes toward 
the cost of operations and the admi- 
nistration fund, which pays for 
advertising, public relations and the 
salaries of Lottery employees. 

The remaining 30 cents is returned 
to the state. Montgomery said these 
dollars will be directed into three 
areas: economic development, the 
property reappraisal program and the 
Kansas prison systems. 

Tostartthe lottery, the sate loaned 

$2.1 million to the Kansas Lottery. 

■ See LOTTERY, Page 16 




Oops! 

Kathy Sunderhuse, sophomore in home economic education, makes 
a face after being accidentally kicked by Christie Everhart, sopho- 



SufT/Greg Vogd 



more in secondary education, Wednesday during Pridette practice. 
The group's first performance will be Sept. 5. 



Admissions face changes 



By The Associated Press 

TOPEKA — Spokesmen for four 
educational organizations urged the 
Legislative Educational Planning 
Committee Wednesday either to 
recommend keeping Kansas' open 
admissions policy for universities, or 
to move very cautiously before sug- 
gesting a change. 

Under the policy, all graduates of 
Kansas high schools arc admitted to 
the state 's six universities, regardless 
of high school standing or test scores. 

There is concern among some 
legislators that this leads to excessive 
costs for higher education in Kansas 
because freshmen courses are 
flooded with students who do not 
remain in school very long and uni- 
versities must provide remedial 
courses in certain subjects to help 



Open universities 
are recommended 



those unprepared for college work 
catch up. 

Spokesmen for Kansas -National 
Education Association, United 
School Administrators of Kansas and 
the Kansas Council on Vocational 
Education strongly suggested to the 
committee that the present policy 
should be retained, 

A spokesman for Associated Stu- 
dents of Kansas is withholding tak- 
ing a stand until several basic policy 
questions are answered. 

"The taxpayers of Kansas have 
come to accept this long tradition of 
our high school graduates being able 



to 'try' our university system," Craig 
Grant, director of political action of 
K-NEA, told the committee. 

"Many students wait until late in 
their education to decide on a voca- 
tion or profession to pursue. Many 
also change directions sometime 
along the way, K-NEA hopes the 
state woukl not close the door to one 
of these students from entering the 
state university of their choice." 

Grant said if the policy is changed, 
K-NEA would be opposed to having 
different admission standards for dif- 
ferent schools, creating one or more 
"elite" schools to the detriment of 



others. 

Gerald W. Henderson, executive 
director of the school administrators 
group, said his organization still 
believes strongly in open 
admissions. 

"We are aware that Kansas is one 
of the few states retaining such a pol- 
icy, but we believe Kansas should not 
rush to be like everyone else," Hen- 
derson said. 

"Al I of us have known young peo- 
ple who for one reason or another had 
difficulty for as many as three or four 
high school semesters, and then blos- 
somed to become good students 
through their college experience." 

He said the universities should 

drop remedial programs, forcing 

high schools to educate their students 

so they are ready for college. 

■ See POLICY, Page 16 



Cooperative 
begins project 



By Alison Neefy 
Staff Writer 



CIA cables still missing after hearings 



By The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — The chief of 
the CIA's clandestine service told 
Congress that lran-Contra indepen- 
dent counsel Lawrence Walsh is 
probing the mystery of missing CIA 
cables alerting the spy agency in late 
198 5 that U.S. -made missiles were 
being shipped to Iran, according to 
testimony released Wednesday. 

Clair George, the CIA's deputy 
director for operations, raised the 
possibility the cables could have 
been destroyed in a cover-up, but he 
discounted the likelihood. 

George's private testimony on 
Aug. 5 and 6 before the congression- 
al Iran -Contra committees was distri- 
buted Wednesday although some 
sensitive portions remain classified 
and were blacked out. 



In addition to his comments on the 
missing cables, George also: 

—Testified that the White House 
and the late CIA Director William J. 
Casey ignored his strong complaints 
that unsavory and untrustworthy 
people were helping run what 
George viewed as a total "arms for 
hostages deal" with Iran. 

— Suggested that Lt. Col. Oliver 
North's engaging personality won 
him friends at the CIA. but a tenden- 
cy toward exaggeration and melodra- 
ma kept even those who liked him 
skeptical about things he told them. 
Still, he said, North had endeared 
himself to Casey, in part because he 
was "action oriented" and reminded 
Casey of his own exploits during 
World War II with the Office of 
Strategic Services, the military pre- 
cursor to the CIA, 



— Declared that the North- 
directed diversion of arms-sales pro- 
fits to aid the Comras was something 
the CIA could not properly be 
involved in, 

"You cannot take United States 
weapons and just go out and sell 
them for a profit and use the profits as 
you see fit," he said. "That's the 
gospel." 

In another development, the Repu- 
blican Party's effort to capitalize on 
North's popularity has drawn a 
rebuke from Sen. Warren Rudman of 
New Hampshire, the senior GOP 
member of the Senate lran-Contra 
committee. 

"If you're like me, you're very 
proud of Oliver North," said the 
fund-raising letter signed by party 
chairman Frank J. Fahrenkopf Jr. 

Rudman, however, said in a letter 



to Fahrenkopf that North had partici- 
pated in deceiving the president and 
other officials and "these are not 
actions that are representative of the 
party of Lincoln, Eisenhower and 
Reagan. 

One controversy the congressional 
investigating committees are trying 
to resolve concerns the question of 
just when the CIA knew that an 
Israeli aircraft being routed to Iran 
through Portugal contained U.S. 
anti-aircraft missiles and that a cover 
story that the cargo consisted of oil- 
drilling parts was false. 

Documents released by the com- 
mittees in June indicated that retired 
Air Force Maj. Gen. Richard V. Sec- 
ord, who had been asked by the 
White House to help with the logis- 
tics of the shipment, had told two 
■ See CONTRA, Page 16 



An economic cooperative, 
recently formed to strengthen the 
bond between the University and 
Manhattan, has started its first 
project 

The Bluemont Consortium was 
organized to promote joint ven- 
tures between the KSU Founda- 
tion, the University, the Manhat- 
tan Chamber of Commerce, the 
Manhattan City Commission and 
the Riley County Commission for 
the benefit of each body. It will be 
targeted specifically toward eco- 
nomic development. 

Its first project is supervision of 
a Manhattan economic develop- 
ment study. The study's focus will 
concentrate on the feasibility of 
building an 826-acre industrial 
and technological park. 

The idea for the consortium ori- 
ginated from the traditional eco- 
nomic link between the Universi- 
ty and the city, said William Muir, 
director of economic develop- 
ment for the Foundation. 

"Both (K-State and Manhattan) 
can exist and function separately, 
but they do much better together," 
he said. 

It will also act as an advisory 
group for the Foundation, Cham- 
ber or any economic 
development-related organization 
created by them. 

Governing the consortium is an 
18 -member Board of Trustees 
composed of representatives from 
the five organizations. 

Very few other cities have a 



university-related group of this 
kind to help the community, said 
Robert Krause, vice president for 
institutional advancement 

"It (the consortium) is very 
atypical. We're able to accom- 
plish much more if we work with 
our local community. They're 
also going to benefit tremendous- 
ly from this venture," he said. 

Regarding the park, Krause 
said the University has received 
positive feedback from the 
community. 

"People are very excited. It is 
the fust time the University has 
reached out to the community in 
this capacity." 

Freilich, Leitner, Carlisle and 
Short! idge, a Kansas City consult- 
ing firm, has been contracted for 
the $90,000 park study. Costs of 
the study will be split among the 
five organizations. 

The study is to be conducted in 
two parts. The firm will separately 
evaluate each of the eight colleges 
for strengths within the particular 
program area. These evaluations 
will then be analyzed in relation to 
Manhattan's private industry. 

"The best pan of this study is 
we (the economic development 
committee) could evaluate the 
colleges, but nobody want* to be 
at the bottom of the list. This way 
everybody feels they've been 
treated fairly," Muir said. 

The primary site chosen for the 
park is located on the west edge of 
Manhattan. The Manhattan 
Chamber of Commerce now 
holds the option to purchase the 
■ See PACT, Page 16 






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KANSAS STATt COLUOiAN. Trwwtey, Auguart 2T t Hftt 



Briefly 



By The Associated Press 



4-year-old's parents buried 

MAPLE GLEN, Pa. — The survival of 4 -year-old Cecilia Chi- 
chan from the crash of Northwest Airlines Flight 255 helps give the 
rest of her family the strength to cope with the deaths of her parents 
and brother, a priest said at their funeral Wednesday. 

Michael Cichan, 32; Paula Cichan, 33; and their 6-year-old son, 
David, who were among the 156 people who died, were remem- 
bered during Mass at St. Alphonsus Roman Catholic Church, where 
the couple was married. 

"Talking about Cecilia will always remind us of the miracle of 
life. We believe God spared her to give the rest of her family the 
strength to bear the cross," the Rev. Andrew Robberecht said during 
the service. 

Three matching, chestnut-brown caskets rested before the altar 
adorned with more than a dozen flower arrangements. About 350 
people packed into the church, 25 miles from Philadelphia. 

The Cichans had been visiting relatives in the area and were en 
route to their home in Tempe, Ariz,, when the plane crashed Aug, 
16. 

'Today as in the past few days, we all stand together as a 
shocked and stricken group of people. Death brings us face to face 
with the deepest questions of faith," Robberecht said. 

The priest, who is also a teacher at nearby Archbishop Wood 
High School, married the Cichans and baptized their two children. 
He described them as "a young, beautiful family with a promising 
future." 

Cecilia's condition was upgraded to fair Wednesday at the the 
Bum Center at the University of Michigan Hospitals in Ann Arbor, 
Mich. 

She did not cry after being told Monday night she would never 
see her parents or brother again, the Arizona Republic reported 
Wednesday, 

"She didn't understand," Pauline Ciamaichela, the Arizona girl's 
grandmother, told the newspaper. "She'll be asking again,** 



Laxalt withdraws from race 

WASHINGTON — Former Sen. Paul Laxalt announced Wed- 
nesday he is withdrawing from the race for the 1988 Republican 
presidential nomination after "a careful and realistic assessment of 
our financial situation." 

Laxalt, who has raised more than $1 million, made the announce- 
ment in a statement issued about 7 p.m. EDT Wednesday by his 
campaign committee. 

Royal couple to attend benefit 

GREENWICH, Conn — Because the Duke and Duchess of 
York, Andrew and Sarah, want to attend a benefit polo match 
next month, the public can't, a sponsor said. 

The staff of the World Wildlife Fund's Friends of the Masai 
Mara Project, which is organizing the Rolcx Challenge Cup match 
Sept 19. will limit the event to an invitation-only crowd of about 
500 people to ensure security, Marc Shafir, a Rolex spokesman 
said Tuesday. 

The original plan was to sell about 200 tickets to the public 
for $15 each, Shafir said. Instead, only the 500 people invited to 
a $200-a-plate luncheon will be allowed to attend. 

"What they decided to do, essentially, was to make it a more 
controllable crowd to improve security with the duke and duchess 
coming," Shafir said, 



Movie crew receives fines 

CEDAR RAPIDS, Iowa — A request by the crew on actor 
Richard Gere's latest movie to excuse 48 parking tickets hasn't 
exactly left officials breathless. 

"If they're getting meter violations on the street, it's nothing the 
city is going to take care of," said Public Safety Commissioner 
Floyd Bergen. 

Someone from Harvest Film Co. dropped off the parking tickets 
at City Hall on Monday expecting they would be excused, Bergen 
said. 

"We want to support the movie and the money the people are 
bringing into the community, but it's very difficult to make this kind 
of decision. Excusing these tickets could set a precedent," Bergen 
said. 

Court overrules textbook case 

ATLANTA — A federal appeals court Wednesday reversed an 
Alabama judge's order banning 44 textbooks from state public 
schools, saying the books improperly excluded references to religion 
or promoted the belief in "secular humanism." 

In allowing the textbooks to remain in use, a three-judge panel of 
the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that U.S. District Judge 
Brevard Hand's order had turned the First Amendment requirement 
that the government be neutral on the subject of religion "into an 
affirmative obligation to speak about religion," 

Former court clerk dead at 95 

MANHATTAN — Joseph F. Musil, who served 34 years as clerk 
of the Riley County District Court, died Wednesday at the age of 
95. 

Musil, a Republican, was first elected in 1938 and served until his 
retirement in 1972, In most of his 16 biennial re-election campaigns. 
Democrats did not bother to run an opposition candidate. 

Since his retirement, Musil maintained an active interest in coun- 
ty and political affairs. 

Feisty Kansan meets Carson 

LOS ANGELES — Proclaiming she was "too mean to die," 
105-year-old Mildred Holt of Ellsworth. Kan., traded quips Wednes- 
day night with Johnny Carson and became the oldest guest of "The 
Tonight Show." 

"You're the oldest person I have ever met and ever had on the 
show," Carson told Holt, who was bom July 17. 1882. 

"That's the way it is at home," said Holt "I'm always the oldest 
one they ever met." 

Dressed in a powder blue outfit with pearls and corsage and sip- 
ping a highball. Holt recalled her family's first automobile in 1914, 
supporting Teddy Roosevelt for president and giving up driving just 
two years ago. 

Asked by Carson what she thought of Jim Bakkcr, the former 
head of the PTL Club. Holt said: "I don't like him at all ... we ought 
to string him up." 

The feisty Kansan asked that they not make fun of her home 
state. 

"I met a man at the hotel and he said,' Where 're you from?' and I 
said Kansas and he said, 'Oh, my goodness.' That made me mad," 
she said. 

"He forgets that Kansas produces more wheat than any stats in 
the Union. That's where your bread comes from ... the trouble is 
they can't get any money for the wheat" 



Campus Bulletin 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



CAMPUS ORGANIZATIONS ne 

encouraged to use Cimpui Bui I din Ml 
announcements muil be submitted by 1 1 i.m 
ihe day before publication. Announcement* 
lor Monday's bulletin mutt be in by 1 1 i.m. 
Friday. Informal ion forms Mt available at the 
table ouuide Kedzie 103. Forms should be left 
in the mailbox it the table after being filled 
out. All tubmitiiont muit be ngned and are 
subject to verification. 

CAREER PLANNING & PLACE- 
MENT will conduct placement orient »tii»i 
meeting! today for union in Apparel A Tex- 
tile Marketing at 9:30 a.m. in Justin 236: Engi- 
neering at 3:30 p.m. in the Union Forum Hill; 
and Economic! al 3:30 p.m. in Holtz Hall. 

TODAY 

ICTHUS CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP 

meeli at 8 p.m. in Union 212. 

PARACHUTE CLUB meet* •■ 7 p.m. in 
Union 209. 

SAILING CLUB meet* at 7 p.m. in Union 
208. 

CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST 

meett at 7 p.m. in Throckmorton 131. 

ALPHA GAMMA RHOLtL SIS meeting 



at 8:30 p.m. at the AGR House Bring fee card 
lor football tickets. 



NATIONAL SOCIETY OF BLACK 

ENGINEERS meet* at 6 p.m. in DurUnd 161 

UPC ISSUES AND IDEAS meets at 7 p.m. 
in Union 202. 

RODEO CLUB executive meeting at 6:30 
p m at 3002 Sugg Hill Road Barbecue at 7 
pm. 

FINANCE CLUB meet* at 7 p.m. in Union 
206. 

AG AMBASSADORS meet at 6 p.m. in 
Waiert 137. 

HOME EC EDUCATION INTEREST 
CROUP meet* at 4:30 p.m. at Call Hall Dairy 
Bar. 

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL hat sche- 
duled the final oral defense of the doctoral dis- 
sertation of Karen Burgan Hoehse al 9 i.m in 
Water* 3G. The dissertation topic is "Controll- 
ing Viscosity of Com: Flour Water Sy items.'' 

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL hat sche- 
duled the final oral dcfcnie of the doctoral dis- 
sertation of Pnthividi B. Rivikumar at 2 p.m. 

in Durland 129. 



JG^SSJl 




Open 7 days a week $J!£f Jjf jj£ 
Free Delivery jttMtaurant 

11 a.m.-1 a.m. 



HUOQM EXPRESS 

iwJi Vhte to ti » Call 539-8868 or 537 0886 



1304 Mm loop SM-MM 
H i0*» of «ntn KSu ID] 



i 



s^ . ^^^ 



Call About Our Perm Specials 
TANNING BED AVAILABLE 



LET OUR REPUTATION GO TO YOUR HEAD 

13 Ph.D.s to serve you 

Haircuts 

HERS $10.50 

Includes 
Shampoo & Style 

$7.50 

NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY 

539-TAME (8263) 
539-8601 



M0N.-SAT. 

9 A.M.-6 P.M. 

THURSDAY NIGHT 

TILL 8 P.M. 



Students Are W elcome! 
[^GREAi^r 

co mmission 
Ch urch 

Statement of Faith: 



We believe the Bible to be the 
Inspired, the only Infallible, 
authoritative Word of God. 

We believe there Is one 
almighty, perfect and triune 
God: Father, Son, and Holy 
Spirit, eternally coexistent 
personalities of the same 
essence. 

We believe In the deity of our 
Lord Jesus Christ, in I lis virgin 
birth, His sinless life. His 
substitutionary death, Hts 
bodily resurrection, Ills 
ascension to the right hand of 
the Father and His personal 
return In power and glory. 
We believe in the personality of 
the Holy Spirit, and in His 
ministry of convicting and 
regenerating sinful men, and 
Indwelling, scaling and 
empowering believers. 

10:30 a.m 
University Inn (1 



We believe in the fall of man 
from the state of Innocence in 
which he was created to one of 
total depravity in which he la 
devoid of spiritual life, and 
Incapable, apart from divine 
power, of pleasing God. 
We believe In the Justification 
of the sinner by grace through 
faith alone. 

We bellevo that the church 
universal is composed of all 
true believers and that its 
members should assemble 
themselves together in local 
churches for worship, prayer, 
fellowship and teaching with a 
view to being equipped to fulfill 
the Great Commission. 
We believe in the bodtly 
resurrecUon of the saved to 
Immortality, and in the 
conscious eternal suffering of 
the lost. 

. Sundays 

7th & Anderson) 




Closed Classes — Fall 1987 



OO10O 

001*0 

OOl*0 

00330 

00170 

00310 

00*40 

00130 

00*60 

000*0 

00**0 

00930 

01250 

01320 

013*0 

01*31 

01**0 

01*30 

01**0 

01T70 

01790 

01*90 

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02000 

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33*4 
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013*0 

0)170 
031M 

03390 

03400 

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0)490 

03500 

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0)5*0 

03150 

035*0 

03570 

035*0 

03*10 

01*20 

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03**0 

03**0 

01*70 

3*80 

037*0 

0)750 

03770 

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3*01 

3*30 

03470 

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05030 

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0*240 

0*170 

0*1*0 

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0*530 

0*550 

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0*590 

0**10 

0**20 

0**10 

0*430 



0**70 
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0*770 
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07500 

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0*4*0 

0(4*0 

0*490 



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04*30 

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10000 
10010 
10020 
10030 



10040 

10050 

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10070 

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10090 

10100 

10110 

10120 

10130 

10140 

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101*0 

10170 

101*0 

101*1 

101*2 

10140 

10200 

10210 

10220 

102)0 

10240 

10250 

102*0 

10270 

10271 

10272 

102*0 

10290 

10)00 

10)20 

10)10 

10340 

10)50 

103*0 

10170 

103(0 

10390 

1O400 

10410 

10*20 

104)0 

10440 

10430 

104*0 

10470 

104*0 

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10500 



10510 


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11290 


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11310 


10531 


11350 


10532 


11370 


10540 


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10550 


11400 


103*0 


11410 


10370 


11440 


105(0 


11*80 


10340 


11490 


10*00 


11310 


10*10 


11530 


10*20 


11550 


10*30 


116*0 


10*48 


11*40 


10720 


11840 


10790 


11430 


10T40 


11440 


10770 


11450 


107*0 


114*0 


10790 


11970 


io*to 


12020 


10(20 


123)0 


10(30 


123*0 


10*40 


123*0 


10(50 


12*50 


10(40 


127*0 


10(70 


12*50 


10(90 


12**0 


10900 


128*0 


109 10 


12970 


1O920 


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10930 


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10*70 


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11)40 


11010 


1)400 


11070 


1)440 


110*0 


1)470 


11100 


114*0 


11120 


1)340 


111*0 


1)3*0 


11140 


1)420 


11170 


1)4)0 


111*0 


13*40 


11199 


1)710 


11200 


1)740 



137*0 
13(90 
13990 
139*0 

13990 

14000 

14010 

14070 

14099 

14159 

14240 

14250 

14270 

142*0 

14290 

14100 

14110 

14120 

14130 

14340 

14150 

141*0 

14)70 

14)80 

1*140 

14410 

14420 

14419 

144*0 

14430 

144*0 

144*0 

14*40 

1*500 

14510 

14520 

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14540 

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1417) 

14574 

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14)77 

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1*5*0 

1*590 



14*40 

14*71 

14710 

14713 

14714 

14740 

14770 

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14*70 

14*95 

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14910 

14920 

14430 

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15000 

19010 

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14280 

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14920 

17050 

17110 

17110 

17220 

174*0 

17700 

17710 

17740 

17*10 



1*7)0 
1*910 

19000 

19010 

19030 

190)1 

19040 

19O90 

19040 

1*070 

190*0 

190*1 

19090 

19100 

19101 

19140 

141*1 

19 1 TO 

19140 

19200 

19240 

14310 

19330 

19341 

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19)40 

19370 

19)40 

19391 

19410 

19420 

19430 

19*30 

19440 

19440 

19910 

19520 

14540 

14550 

199*0 

1*5*0 

14940 

19410 

14**0 

14790 

19*10 

19*20 

19(40 

1*900 

1*920 



194*0 
19*90 
200*0 
20120 

20140 

29150 

20230 

20270 

20920 

20530 

20540 

20950 

20551 

205(0 

20*00 

20*20 

20*50 

20*70 

20740 

20920 

204)0 

20*40 

20*70 

20(80 

20*40 

20910 

20970 

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2 10*0 

210(0 

21090 

21100 

21120 

21220 

21300 

21410 

21420 

21440 

214*0 

21470 

214*0 

21490 

21310 

21930 

21540 

2 1570 

21410 

21*70 

214*0 

22290 



22300 

22390 

22400 

22300 

22710 

227*0 

224)0 

22*40 

22(40 

22470 

22*90 

2)0*0 

23140 

23230 

23230 

23330 

23410 

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23*41 

23** 2 

21790 

2)7*0 

23*00 

23*10 

23470 

2 34*0 

23410 

2)910 

2)990 

2)970 

2)9*0 

24000 

24020 

24040 

24050 

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24110 

241)0 

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24170 

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24212 

24214 

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24420 

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247)0 
24770 

247*0 

24790 

24*90 

24420 

24430 

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231)0 

25140 

25170 

291*0 

29210 

25220 

25230 

29240 

23270 

252*0 

29320 

23400 

23910 

25710 

25720 

25730 

25740 

25730 

257*0 

23770 

257(0 

25740 

23800 

25(10 

21(20 

25*30 

25*40 

25*50 

25940 

25*70 

2 3**0 

25*40 

23900 

25910 

25920 

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259*0 

2)9*0 

29970 

259(0 

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24010 



24030 
2*090 

2*040 
2*090 
2*100 
2*130 
2*140 
2*170 
2*190 
2*200 
2*2*0 
2*310 
2*140 
2*3*0 
2*370 
2*3*0 
24190 
2*400 
2*440 
2*500 
2*400 
2*470 
2*4(0 
2*700 
24710 
24750 

2* no 

2*7*0 
2**00 
24*10 
2**40 
2**70 
2*910 
2*920 
2*940 
27OO0 
27040 
270*0 
27070 
270(0 
27O90 
27210 
272)0 
27290 
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274)5 
27440 
274*5 
27510 
27*10 



47470 
27490 
2*390 

2*940 

24010 

29200 

29241 

24250 

24240 

24270 

242(0 

24290 

29)00 

29110 

29120 

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24)50 

293*0 

29)92 

29400 

29410 

29420 

29430 

294*0 

29540 

29330 

245*0 

29570 

294*1 

29490 

29**0 

29470 

29700 

297)0 

29T40 

29790 

29(20 

24* *0 

29490 

29910 

29920 

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299*0 

2*970 

30050 

MHO 

30900 

309*0 

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30720 

31000 

31010 

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11090 

11200 

11250 

312*0 

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113)0 

31**0 

31430 

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11*40 

31900 

319*0 

11970 

12090 

12110 

12230 

32240 

32550 

329*0 

32900 

32910 

12950 

11000 

1)010 

31020 

33040 

13030 

13040 

33110 

13120 

33150 

11140 

11250 

1)290 

3)300 

11)10 

3)320 

)))70 

11450 

114*0 

334*0 

31*30 



11T90 
11790 
13810 
33MO 
334*0 
34020 



34090 

34120 

34200 

34210 

34220 

14240 

34240 

34240 

3*330 

3*340 

34370 

34440 

34440 

34320 

34420 

34750 

34* 10 

34*90 

)4410 

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19029 

19050 

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15*10 

35430 

33440 

35(10 

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34170 

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34230 

3*290 

34)70 

3*510 

1*740 

3**10 

3*420 

34(10 

34440 

14(90 



34(40 

36(71 
34(40 
34400 
3*910 
M420 
1*430 
1*930 
1*9*0 
37090 
37390 
37*00 
17540 
17540 
1*0)0 
1*040 
1*110 
18230 
1(370 
18*60 
30**0 



DEAD OR ALIVE? 




CHILI COOKS 

FOR AGGIEVILLES 

CHILI COOKOFF 1987 

SEPTEMBER 26 

Categories include: living groups, 
competition chili, homestyle chili and 
specialty chili. Prizes and trophies will be 
awarded. Last entry date, September 18th. 
For rules and information call. 776-8050. 
Sponsored by: 

strIhv*4io4 

LIGHT 




HFFFt 



Aggieville 

fint in its diss.' 



i 






t^. 



KANSAS STATI C0LLI0IAN, Thursday, August 27, 1M7 



Students to take advantage of offer 



Dorms to receive 
cable TV service 



By Jeffrey J. Bielser 
News Editor 

Dorm residents now have the 
opportunity to receive the same cable 
service afforded to other Manhattan 



subscribers. ' 

An agreement reached earlier this 
year between Manhattan Cable TV 
Services Inc. and the Department of 
Housing allows the cable system to 
install hook-ups in residence hall 



Companies neglect 
disease counseling 



rooms. Cable was already available 
in some lobbies of the halls. 

So far, the response has been good 
by residents, with about 20 percent of 
the available rooms signed for cable 
service, said Dan Hebert, general 
manager of Manhattan Cable T.V., 
610 Humboldt Si. 

Tables have been set up in lobbies 
of the different residence halts for 
people to register for cable service 
installation in their rooms, he said. 
Sign up will continue until Sept. 1. 

Prospective customers can save 
$20 by signing up while the company 
is on campus, since it is offering free 



By The Associated Press 

BOSTON — A majority of the 
country's top businesses axe unpre- 
pared to deal with AIDS despite 
growing evidence the fatal disease 
could eventually cost corporate 
America billions of dollars, a survey 
released Wednesday found. 

Of 100 Fortune 1000 companies 
surveyed in late July, only 29 had 
policies for dealing with employees 
with AIDS and nine were consider- 
ing adopting guidelines, according to 
the survey by the Boston office of 
TcIeScarch Inc. 

"It is almost as though most of 
these companies don't want to admit 
that AIDS exists or that it will only 
affect the 'other* company," said 
Ellen C. Kinlin, president of Tele- 
Search, a national executive search 
firm owned by Fidelity Investments. 

Three of the companies surveyed 
said they would fire employees who 
contracted acquired immune defi- 
ciency syndrome, while 25 said they 
might do so, the survey found. 

Sixty-seven companies said they 
would not fire employees with AIDS 
and five refused to answer the 
question. 

Of the 14 companies requiring 
employees to have regular medical 
checkups, only one required an 
AIDS test, TeleSearch said. 

One-third of the companies said 
they expected health insurance costs 
to increase dramatically because of 
AIDS white 25 companies said insur- 
ance costs would not increase, 
according to the survey. 

AIDS eventually could cost major 
corporations billions of dollars 
"because of increased health insur- 
ance costs, lost work lime and pro- 
duction and related costs, the Tele- 



Search report said. 

TcIeScarch refused to release the 
names of the companies it surveyed, 
saying it promised them confiden- 
tiality. The surveyed companies are 
in New England, New York, 
Washington and Chicago and repre- 
sent manufacturing, insurance, 
health care, utilities and consumer 
products, the company said. 

A random survey of a dozen major 
companies Wednesday by The Asso- 
ciated Press found varying efforts to 
deal with AIDS, which attacks the 
body's ability to fight disease and 
infection. The disease primarily is 
spread through sexual contact and 
the sharing of infected needles by 
intravenous drug users. 

Several company spokesmen said 
constant developments in research 
and the uncertainty among govern- 
ment and the insurance industry 
about how to respond to the disease 
were partly repsonsible for what 
TeleSearch termed the corporate 
world's lagging response to dealing 
with AIDS. 

Raytheon Co., a major defense 
contractor which has 76,000 employ- 
ees worldwide, does not have a for- 
mal AIDS policy, said spokesman Ed 
Powers. 

"Our approach to AIDS is on a 
case-by-case basis," Powers said. 
"We don't sec any hard and fast 
answers to the AIDS question at this 
point. A position this week could 
change based on new information 
next week." 

Sears, Roebuck and Co. does not 
have an AIDS policy because it 
"does not differentiate between 
AIDS and any other illness or dis- 
ease," said Doug Fairwcaihcr, a 
spokesman for die Chicago-based 
retail company. 




IMPORT 

BEER 

NIGHT 

50$ off 
All Imports 

All Day 
THURSDAYS 






LAST 
CHANCE 



::: m:r: wiiniui 



HOME OF THE 
AROUND the 

WORLD 
BEER CLUB 

Open at noon Sundays' 



installation, Hebert said. After the 
deadline, anyone wanting cable ser- 
vice in their room will have to go 
through the main office and pay the 
installation fee. 

He said students can sign up now 
for service, indicate a later installa- 
tion date that should not be later than 
Sept. 30, and still not pay an installa- 
tion fee. 

Construction is still going on in 
Marlatt, Haymaker and West halls, 
hence service to some rooms there 
might be delayed, Hebert said. 

The agreement seems to benefit 
both the cable company and the resi- 



619 N. Manhattan 

I Welcome Back 
Students! 



THURSDAY 

$1.25 Pitchers 
$1.00 Kamis 



Haven't You 

Heard? 

Were ROCKIN'I 

at the Horse! 

OPEN DAILY 
at 3 P.M. 

Ili.ir 539-9081 Office 776-6638| 



dence halls. 

The service has not cost the 
Department of Housing any money. 

"We have made no financial 
investment at all," said Tom Frith, 
director of the Department of Hous- 
ing. "No money is coming out of the 
students' pockets." 

Also a smalt percentage of the 
money made from the service will go 
into the Mable Strong Scholarship 
Fund, he said. The scholarship is 
awarded to people in residence halls 
for outstanding leadership. 

For the cable company, expansion 
to the residence halls has given it a 



chance for a bigger market 

The company is providing increas- 
ing levels of service in Manhattan 
and by including the dorms now, a 
pay-off period is realized, Hebert 
said. 

Among the things that persuaded 
the company to accept the deal for 
the residence halls were renewal of 
the company's franchise and the 
results of surveys from the housing 
department, he said. 

Those surveys, conducted two 
years ago, showed a high degree of 
interest from students wanting cable 
in their residence hall rooms. 




WELCOME 
BACK 



K-STATE 



STUDENTS 
& FACULTY 




lir TORV OF^R;... 



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Former K- Stater faces 
illegal firearms charges 




By Staff and Wire Reports 

A former K-State student has been 
indicted on a charge of illegally mak- 
ing and transferring firearms. 

Kyle T. Ditlinger, 22, of 1225 
Claflin Road, was named in a five- 
count indictment alleging he illegally 
made and transferred three firearms 
equipped with silencers in violation 
of federal law. Each count carries a 
maximum of 10 years in prison and a 



SI 0,000 fine. 

Dillinger was last enrolled at K- 
Statc in the fall of 1986, according to 
the Registrar's Office. 

In addition, Babbctte Leigh Lewis, 
26. Junction City, was named in a 
two-count indictment alleging she 
embezzled money from the Army 
and Air Force Exchange Service, 
where she worked as a clerk on the 
Fort Riley post, and falsified records 
to conceal the embezzlement. 



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Editorial 



Kansas State Collegian ■ Thursday, August 27, 1987 ■ Page 4 



Kansas State Collegian 



EDITOR 

Deron Johnson 
MANAGING EDITOR 

Becky Lucas 
NEWS EDITOR 
Jeff Bielser 



EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR 

Christine Doll 
PHOTO/GRAPHICS EDITOR 

John Thelandcr 
ADVERTISING MANAGER 

Judy Goetz 



EDITORIAL BOARD: Judd Annis, Kirk Caraway. Jenny Chaulk, Christine Doll, 
Michael Krucger, Deron Johnson, Candy Leonard, Becky Lucas, Judy Lundstrom, 
Michael Nichols, Patti Paxson, Chad Sanborn 

Til E COLLEG I AN (U5FS 1*1 MO) u publiihod by Student Publicum be. Kuuu Suit Lnivenity, dtUy during she f*U 
ind cpnng term e*«p( 5ituid»y>. Sund»y». holidiye end Ufti»«iiiy v«aUon penodi OFFICES ire in the north wmj of 
Kedxie 11*11. phooe 532 -65S5 SECOND CLASS POSTAGE p.td el NUnhettm, K.n. W502 SUBSCRJITION RATES: 
ci)endirye»r, J4t>. ■odemic y*ir, S35; tmcfter. 130; nmmeruinii, $10. Add™ ch»ngej end letlen to die editor ihould he 
sent to the Kinui Suu CoUegim. Kediie H»U 103. Kanui Sute Unjvemty. Mwihiiun. K»n, f/,506 



More federal control 
needed for air traffic 



The crash of a Northwest Airlines 
jet Aug. 16 should have come as a 
surprise to no one. It was a tragedy 
waiting to happen. 

And an overdue one at that. 

For too long, the airline industry 
in the United States has teetered on 
the edge of disaster: There are too 
few controllers regulating too many 
flights, and the number of near colli- 
sions continues to increase. 

Given that information, it's urgent 
that the level of safety in the skies 
should be improved. Indeed, that has 
been one of Transportation Secret- 
ary Elizabeth Dole's top priorities. 

However, her recommendations 
for improving safety have met with 
stiff resistance from the 
260,000-member Aircraft Owners 
and Pilots Association, which has 
called for her resignation. The group 
has also begun a letter-writing cam- 
paign and is scheduled to place an ad 
in USA Today this week calling for 
her to step down. 

Somehow, that comes as no 
surprise. 

Dole has proposed that existing 



Terminal Control Areas around 
major airports be expanded and that 
other airports adopt a TCA, thereby 
improving safety due to increased 
regulation. 

The pilots' association has called 
Dole unqualified to handle her job; 
thus the resignation request. What 
that association is more interested in 
is looking out for No. 1 and avoiding 
the "hassles" of implementing 
increased security measures. 

Even if the group is successful in 
getting Dole out of office — which is 
highly unlikely — it still must face 
an angry Congress that is poised to 
institute some of the toughest safety 
regulations in the industry's history. 
Congressional leaders have identi- 
fied safety as a top priority. 

What the pilots' association 
doesn't realize is that the safety 
"hassles" are desperately needed and 
would save lives. The last thing the 
airline industry needs right now is 
political bickering. 

The Aircraft Owners and Pilots 
Association needs to let Elizabeth 
Dole do her job. 



Policy betters K-State 
by awarding scholars 



K-State academics is getting the 
recognition it deserves, and it has to 
thank the program implemented to 
attract the "best and the brightest." 

This year K-Sute doubled their 
number of National Merit Scholars 
over last year. These 34 honor stu- 
dents chose to attend the University 
because they were informed about 
the excellent academic programs K- 
State offers, and also because of an 
improved scholarship program. 

These students are the first to 
receive full-ride scholarships for 
something other than athletics. Not 
to knock athletic scholarships, but it 
is about time the University recog- 
nized outstanding scholars. 

And thanks to efforts made by 
President Jon Wefald in convincing 
the Foundation to donate money to 
National Merit Scholars, *e scho- 
larship amount offered to each 
increased up to $5,000. 

National Merit Scholars are 



important to a university because of 
the prestige associated with the 
scholarship program. Traditionally, 
the University of Kansas has 
attracted the highest number of 
National Merit Scholars in the state, 
indicating to some that KU offers 
better scholastic programs. 

But this year, preliminary statis- 
tics show that K-State has tied with 
KU in attracting National Merit 
Scholars. This is good news to a 
school trying to make a comeback 
after years of declining enrollments. 

The reputation of having out- 
standing scholars can attract more 
scholars. Last year K-State took the 
time to brag about its programs and 
outstanding numbers of Truman 
Scholars, Rhodes Scholars, and 
other scholarship winners. This 
effort made potential students take 
another look at K-State. 

Kansans like K-State; the num- 
bers show it. 



Religion delays peace 

People forced into conformity 



Imagine there's no heaven. It's easy if you 
try. No hell below us. Above us only sky. Alt 
the people, living life in peace. 

John Lennon. 

John Lennon evaluated life with this tru- 
ism in his song "Imagine." His belief came 
from examining society in the context of his 
life as well as in historical considerations. He 
found that most of the confrontations in the 
world stemmed from religion. It seems 
because of the different religions, people 
believe "If you don'tbclicvc in myGod, you 
should die," 

Religion certainly has a place in our socie- 
ty. It provides us with an historical back- 
ground dating to 2,000 years ago. llalso gives 
us a moral crutch to fall on in times of crisis. 
Religion provides people an outline of how 
they should conduct their lives. Unfortunate- 
ly, most of the religious books and other arti- 
facts arc horribly outdated to comply with 
current standards and to give insight into 
modem life. How can we pattern our lives on 
what happened 2.000 years ago? 

Also, in America, the books of the Bible 
that we use have gone through at least two 
language changes since they were written. 
During these translations, what could have 
been lost or hidden? Embellishment could 
have occurred. The translators could have 
done this so that we behave according to their 
moral standards. Today's religion has 
attempted to create a conformist society base- 
d on the moral standards established hun- 
dreds of years ago. 

Not only docs religion erode our moral 
self-dctxrminauon, it has also been the cause 
of much bloodshed. It seems when wc con- 
form to the religion, wc must fight for its sur- 
vival. Several instances come to mind. The 
first is the conflict in the Middle East. The 



Commentary 




Mike 
Krueger 

Collegian 
I Columnist 



Palestine Liberation Organization wants a 
homeland, and Jerusalem is their intended 
locale. Unfortunately, the sovereign nation (a 
term used loosely) of Israel covets and now 
covers that land. Why? This piece of war-torn 
land is the religious homeland to both of 
them. The PLO tries to make its point to the 
world community by sponsoring terrorist 
activities. 

Other instances of religious warfare 
include the war between Iran- Iraq which has 
lasted 800 years, the batUc between the Pro- 
testants and Catholics in the land of Eire, and 
Adolf Hitler's mass extermination of Jews. 

Other places where religion can be found 
with blood are in Guyana and South Africa. 
Of course, the religious sect that the Rev. Jim 
Jones led to Guyana ended with a mass sui- 
cide. In South Africa, the Dutch followers of 
John Calvin relied heavily on the teachings of 
the Old Testament and paralleled themselves 
to Abraham. The Dutch saw the blacks in 
South Africa as the equivalent to the Canaan- 
itcs, and thought the blacks were there to 
serve them. That practice continues today in 
that abhorrence we call apartheid. Thus, it 
seems religion has segregated us and ended in 



bloodshed. 

Religion also hurts our pocketbooks. For 
their moral support, they ask for 1 percent of 
our paychecks as well as a contribution every 
Sunday. Oral Roberts wants money for his 
medical school, or God will "call him home." 
Jerry Fulwcll wants megabucks to keep the 
PTL club going after Jim Bakkcr's actions. 
Youth for Christ, the Fellowship of Christian 
Athletes, and other religious organizations 
want money. Why do wc need churches? If 
wc want to have religion, why not have it in 
the privacy of our own homes? 

Religion docs provide us with a way to 
live. Catholics aren't to use birth control 
because the church says so. The rationale 
behind this could be to increase the number of 
Catholics and thus the church's coffers. The 
repercussions include unwanted pregnancies, 
child abuse, and a higher susceptibility to 
AIDS. Even a priest in Wichita didn't use 
birth control. Maybe society doesn't have the 
moral fiber to make their own decisions as to 
what is right and what is wrong. 

It is interesting to note that wc cannot get 
away from religion. To work for this institu- 
tion, you ha vc to sign an oath to God. This is a 
violation of church and state, I believe. The 
Collegian staff last semester stopped Blue 
Key. I guess they forgot about themselves. 

Yes, religion is embedded firmly within 
our society. It tells us what to do, where to go, 
whom to associate with, and how to live our 
lives. It will not allow us to develop our own 
standards. Unfortunately, whether we have 
nuclear weapons or slicks to do battle with, 
wc will never have peace as long as there is ' 
religion. Religion seems to lake away more 
lhan it gives. I don't think God (whichever 
one you believe in) would have intended it 
that way. 






Government body active for students 



Gee, isn't it great to be starting anoiher 
school year here at K-State? Whether you are 
a first semester plcbe or a seasoned K-State 
veteran, one thing is certain: you are antici- 
pating the many joys and wonders the 
upcoming semester is sure to bring. Amid the 
fun and excitement of freezing, rainy Satur- 
day afternoons spent at KSU Stadium, a 
week's worth of pomping floats and getting 
no sleep in preparation for Homecoming, and 
spare time between classes spent in the Union 
lab unsuccessfully scoping for the perfect 
specimen, the average student finds it diffi- 
cult to keep up with the many happenings of 
K-Statc's Student Governing Association. 

Someone, somewhere i#i K -State SGA his- 
tory understood students' problems. So, to 
serve student needs, the Senate Communica- 
tions Committee was created 

As chair of this committee, I'd just love to 
tell you all about SGA and how you can keep 
informed about all its activities. So mm up 
the John Phillips Sousa, sink into your favo- 



rite easy chair, grab a tail cold one (milk, of 
course) and allow me to share with you the 
magical fantasy that is student government. 

Our government greatly resembles that 
one which our forefathers brilliantly 
designed 200 years ago — you know, the 
three limbs or whatever. Our student body 
president, Kent Bradley, even has his own 
executive cabinet complete with a chief of 
staff: the lovely and talented Janclle Larson. 
Don't worry though; SGA doesn't boast any 
Robert McFarlands, John Poindextcrs or 
Ollie Norths. We only have Kirk Caraway. 

Even though (here is no SGA Supreme 
Court, many young, aspiring Sandra Day 
O'Connors and William Rchnquisls-to-bc 
have begun their judicial careers here. From 
living group judicial boards to Student Tri- 
bunal (the highest SGA appellate board) 
there is a panel for everyone, 

Personal prejudices aside (or maybe not), 
the unicameral legislative branch is the show- 
cue of the K- State SGA. Sorry to break the 



Commentary 




Charlene 
Nichols 

Guest 
Columnist 



news to you. Kent, but under the leadership ot 
Chairwoman Michelle Benoit, Studcnl 
Senate is the largest and most visible of all 
SGA operations. Forty-nine senators repre- 
senting the eight colleges and the Graduaic 
School are primarily responsible for all kinds 
of nifty legislation. Take, for example, 
Senate Bill 69-14-7. With this piece of legis- 
lation, Sludcnt Senate declared October 31. 
1969 as All Spirits Day and "admonishes all 



students to ccLcbraie this event as befits cus- 
tom. ..students are further admonished to find 
some means of aid for the beleaguered peo- 
ples of the world." Of course, this is from a 
senate term long since passed. We now deal 
with more sophisticated problems, like park- 
ing at Jardine Terrace and the renovation of 
Hoi ion Hall. 

How docs a person keep up with all of this 
SGA activity? Heck, it's easy. The best way 
to stay informed is to eagerly scan the Colle- 
gian daily. Before each meeting, you'll find a 
story about Senate's planned agenda, while 
articles detailing Senate's actions will run 
after the meetings. 

Another great way to stay informed is by 
calling the Student Senate Hotline, Senators 
man this line Monday through Friday, H:30 
a.m. to 4:30 p.m., throughout the semester. 
They arc willing and somewhat capable or 
informing you of senate happenings. If you 
have a complaint or suggestion or need an 
explanation about anything at K -State, sena- 



tors will field those also. 

People with iron stomachs and an ability to 
face challenges with spunk might find it 
advantageous to speak to a senator in person. 
During the hours listed previously, a senator 
may be found in the Student Government 
Services office. That's on the ground floor of 
the Union by the automated teller machines. 
Any senator is happy to be dragged away 
from "The Young and the Restless" - the offi- 
cial SGA soap - to help a fellow student with 
a concern or question. 

Thursdays at 7 p.m., Senate meets in the 
Union Big 8 Room. It's a "happening" time, 
and all students arc invited to attend. Not only 
do Senate members abound, but faculty, staff 
and administration can be found at meetings. 
Come, nib elbows — or noses — with people 
who make the news. Get involved. Student 
government is just that: government by and 
for students. For us to do our job right, we 
need your input Please don't let us down. 






^^MM^M 



KANSAS STATI COUSOtAN, ThurxHy, Augurt 27, HIT 



Committee 



By Ttw Associated Prw 

TOPEKA — The Senate Trans- 
portation and Utilities Committee 
put together a highway plan Wednes- 
day, one that calls for $1,18 billion in 
new highway construction and 
would increase the state sales (ax a 
half-percent. 

"I think the closeness of 
the vote shows the exact 
scenario you're going to 
have on the (Senate) 
tloor. I wasn't sure were 
going to accomplish 
what we accomplished 
today. I think we wore out 
some of the committee." 
—Sen. mil Morris 



New construction to increase sales tax 



The committee's proposal, 
approved by a 6-5 vote, calls for 
spending $535 million less on new 
construction than Gov. Mike Hay- 
den's comprehensive highway prop- 
osal. Hay den's proposal relied heavi- 
ly on increases in motor fuels taxes 
and vehicle registration fees and did 
not increase the 4 percent sales tax. 

The committee also voted lo prop- 
ose putting a list of projects in the 
law, whereas Hayden has proposed 



pulling them in a non-binding resolu- 
tion as a guide to the state Depart- 
ment of Transportation. The commit- 
tee's list includes enhanced two-lane 
highways in southeast Kansas, a 
"northwest passage" from Wichita to 
Hutchinson to Hays and improved 
highways in southwest Kansas. 

The committee's chairman, Sen. 
Bill Morris, R- Wichita, broke a tie to 
give the plan an endorsement. Agree- 
ment came after the committee could 
not work out a proposal in two meet- 
ings last week. 

"I think the closeness of the vote 
shows the exact scenario you're 
going to have on the (Senate) floor," 
Morris said. "I wasn't sure were 
going to accomplish what we accom- 
plished today. I think we wore out 
some of the committee." 

Morris said the committee would 
use the plan as a guide to make 
changes in Hayden's plan when the 
Legislature convenes Monday for a 
special session. However, committee 
members also voted to introduce 
Hayden's plan as a courtesy to the 
governor. 

Hayden said in a statement 
released by his office he was 
"encouraged" by the committee's 
plan but expressed reservations 



about the proposed sales tax 
increase. Kathy Peterson, Hayden's 
press secretary, said the governor 
sees the program as a "first step." 

"I think he docs sec it as a first step 
and a bold one at that," Peterson said. 

Secretary of Transportation Hor- 
ace Edwards also praised the com- 
mittee for its work but said the plan 
had "very, very serious problems." 

"1 am very pleased that they got a 
plan, which shows they can move 
forward," Edwar ds said. 

What the new plan means/ 
Page 6 

The committee's plan has a $1 .66 
billion pricetag over (he nine-year 
life of the program. The cost includes 
new construction, $348 million to 
keep up KDOT's routine mainte- 
nance programs, $133 million for 
improved maintenance, $5 million in 
aid to help cities maintain links to 
stale highways and $3 million for 
increased aid for transportation prog- 
rams Tor the handicapped and 
elderly. 

To pay for the program, the state's 
gasoline and diescl fuel taxes would 
increase by four cents a gallon, of 
which a penny would go back lo 
cities and counties. The sales tax 



would increase a half-percent, and 
vehicle registration fees would 
increase by between 35 percent, for 
trucks, to 100 percent, for passenger 

cars. 

The committee's plan would raise 
taxes and fees $1.54 billion over nine 
years, but members said the sales tax 
increase would stay in effect at least 
until the program was paid for. In 
contrast, Hayden's plan would have 
raised taxes by almost $1.43 billion 
and have the state issue nearly $1.3 
billion in bonds. 

Under Hayden's plan, the state 
would increase its gasoline and 
diescl fuels taxes by five cents a gal- 
lon and its vehicle registration fees 
by between 50 percent, for trucks, 
and 100 percent, for passenger cars. 
Both the fees and taxes would be 
indexed, or adjusted for inflation. 

Hayden's plan also would have 
built 1,319 miles of new roads, most- 
ly along existing highway corridors 
using existing rights-of-way. The 
committee's plan would build about 
880 miles of new highways. 

All but about 70 miles of the 880 
miles would be "Super Two" high- 
ways or two-lane roads with I2-foot- 
wide driving lanes, wide shoulders 
and occassional passing lanes. 



The southeast, southwest and 
south-central parts of the slate would 
receive two major projects each. 

In southeast Kansas, the Kansas 
96 corridor from Beaumont to 
Ncodcsha would be upgraded lo a 
Super Two, as well as the U.S. 160 
corridor from Ncodcsha thorough 
Parsons to the Missouri border south- 
east of Pittsburg. In addition, U.S. 69 
from the Oklahoma border to Louis- 
burg would be upgraded lo a Super 
Two. 

In southwest Kansas, U.S. 54 from 
Kingman to the Oklahoma border 
would be upgraded to a Super Two, 
as would U.S. 50 from Bucklin to the 
Colorado border. Also. K-96 would 
be upgraded to a four-lane highway 
between Wichita and Hutchinson, as 
would K-96 in northeast Wichita, 

The state also would build a Super 
Two from Hutchinson to Great Bend 
to Hays and upgrade U.S. 75 from 
Topcka lo Ihe Nebraska border to a 
Super Two. 

Edwards criticized the plan 
because it did not use bond fi nanci ng. 
Such a plan, he said, may cause cash 
llow problems if the intake of 
revenues docs not match expendi- 
tures closely. 

Hayden said in his statement he 



was "disappointed" the committee 
chose to propose a sales tax increase. 
He has said lawmakers should rely 
on the fuels taxes and fees because 
who drive on Ihe roads will pay for 
them. 

Thai sentiment was echoed by 
Sen. Dick Bond, R -Overland Park, 
who voted againsi the plan. He was 
joined by Sens. Ross Doyen, R- 
Concordia; Jim Francisco, D- 
Mulvanc;Lcroy Hayden, D-Santana, 
and Ben Vidricksen, R-Salina, 

"In some ways, a sales lax for this 
purpose is almost a raid on general 
funds," Bond said. 

However, Morris defended the 
plan, saying the committee's rejec- 
tion of bond financing and indexing 
forced it to find sources of revenue 
other than user fees. Other members 
voting for the plan were Sens. Robert 
Frcy, R- Liberal; Jeanne Hofcrer, R- 
Topcka, Phil Martin, D-Pittsburg; 
Joe Norvell, D-Hays, and Dan Thics- 
scn, R-Indepcndcncc. 

Norvell said he could not support 
bond financing. He and other law- 
makers have balked interest costs in 
Hayden's plans, projected at $ 1 .4 bil- 
lion over 20 years. 

"1 don't like paying interest to 
banks," Norvell said. "I don't like 
paying bond attorneys. We get less 
highway for our money when we do 
thai." 





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Nation's trade gap grows 



By The Aisocioted Press 

WASHINGTON — The nation's 
trade deficit swelled to an all-time 
high of $39.5 billion from April to 
June as a rising tide of imports over- 
took a smaller increase in exports, the 
government reported Wednesday. 

The Commerce Department said 
(he widening in the gap between 
what America sells abroad and what 
it purchases followed a shortfall of 
$38.8 billion in the January- io- 
March quarter, the previous record 
for a three-month period. 

The first-quarter deficit was 
revised from the $38.3 billion esti- 
mated initially. 

The new report showed that, 
despite a targe decline in the value of 
the dollar which in theory should 
make U.$. goods more competitive, 



the deficit worsened in terms of both 
value and volume. 

Imports increased $3.8 billion 
over the period to $99.5 billion. The 
volume of imports, which in the first 
quarter had shown a slight decrease, 
did a turnabout and rose by 2 percent. 
This matched a 2 percent increase in 
prices over the period. 

The largest increase in the value of 
imports was in passenger cars from 
Asia. Imports of Japanese automo- 
biles were up 15 percent while 
imports from Korea soared 90 per- 
cent, reflecting the popularity of the 
Hyundai line. 

All non-petroluem imports 
increased during the period by 3 per- 
cent to $89.5 billion. Petroleum 
imports rose 15 percent, to $10 
billion. 

Analysts saw the report as fresh 



evidence that the U.S. trade deficit is 
not showing any improvement, even 
when import volumes arc taken into 
account. 

"On a nominal basis, there is no 
turn in the trade deficit, simply no 
tum. That potentially spells trouble 
for the U.S. economy, although not 
right away," said Allen Sinai, chief 
economist for Shearson Lehman 
Brothers of New York. 

Sinai said one factor is that foreign 
manufacturers are not raising their 
prices to reflect the weaker dollar ful- 
ly, taking smaller profits instead. At 
the same time, U.S. companies are 
not reducing their overseas prices to 
take advantage of the more competi- 
tive dollar, but in many cases are rais- 
ing them, Sinai said. 

"U.S. companies are going for gre- 
ater profits instead of more market 



share, and that's a big mistake," he 
said. 

The dollar is worth only 40 to 50 
percent of what it was worth in 
mid-1985. Butdcspite this deprecia- 
tion, export prices in the second quar- 
ter of 1987 actually rose 1 percent, 
Wednesday's report showed. 

Exports, overall, increased in the 
April -June quarter by $3 billion to 
$60 billion. Analysts said this was a 
bright spot in the otherwise gloomy 
report. Exports had decreased just 
slightly in the first quarter to $56.99 
billion, down from $57.02 billion in 
the last three months of 1986. 

Some analysts argued that, despite 
the widening of the trade gap, if 
recent inflation is taken into account, 
the trade figures actually show a 
slight improvement. 



Senate highway plan's major provisions 



By Th« Associated Press 

TOPEKA — Following are the 
major provisions of the highway plan 
the Senate Transportation and Utili- 
ties endorsed Wednesday: 

The pricetag of the program would 
be $1.66 billion over nine years, of 
which $1 . 18 billion would be for new 
construction. The increases in taxes 
and vechicle registration fees would 
raise $1 .54 billion over the life of the 
program, but committee members 
said a proposed increase in the sates 
tax would stay in effect) until the 
program was paid for. 
Major Highway Projects 
■ A "Super Two" highway from 
Beaumont to Neodesha along the 
Kansas 96 corridor ahd from 



Neodesha through Parsons to the 
Missouri border southeast of Pills- 
burg along the U.S. 160 corridor. A 
Super Two is a two- lane highway 
with 12-fooi-wide driving lanes, 
wide shoulders and occassional pass- 
ing lanes. Miles: 164. Estimated cost: 
$226 million. 

■ A Super Two from the Mis- 
souri border north to Louisburg 
along the U.S. 69 corridor. Miles: 
130. Estimated cost: $79 million. 

■ The "northeast circumvential" 
in Wichita, a four-lane limited access 
freeway from the K-96 bypass from 
Kellogg to Interstate 235. Miles: 10. 
Estimated Cost: $95 million. 

■ The "northwest passage." 
First, a four-lane expressway from 
Maize lo Hutchinson along the K-96 



corridor. Then, a Super Two diagon- 
al from Hutchinson to Great Bend 
and from Great Bend to Hays. Miles: 
150. Estimated cost: $322 million. 

■ A SupcrTwo from Kingman to 
the Oklahoma border southwest of 
Liberal along the U.S. 54 corridor. 
Miles: 192. Estimated cost: $129 
million. 

■ A Super Two from Buck I in to 
the Colorado border along the U.S. 
50 corridor. Miles: 149. Estimated 
cost: $78 million. 

■ A four-lane expressway from 
Kechi to El Dorado along the K-254 
corridor. Miles: 21. Estimated cost: 
$61 million. 

■ A Super Two from Topeka lo 
the Nebraska border along the U.S. 
75 corridor. Miles: 62. Estimated 
cost: $42 million. 



Other Spending 

■ Increased financing for 
KDOT's normal operations and rou- 
tine maintenance for the nine-year 
life of the program, $348 million. 

■ Increased general aid to cities 
and counties, $193 million. 

■ Local projects designed to ease 
traffic congestion in urban areas 
across the state, 28 projects, $150 
million. 

■ Improvments in maintenance 
of existing roads, $133 million. 

Revenue Source 

■ A half-percent increase in the 
state's 4 percent sales tax. It would 
raise $900 million over nine years, of 
which $72 million would go lo cities 
and counties. The increase would 
take effect Jan. 1, 1988. 




Collegian/Chrii A»if 



Wet Weather Woes 

Becky Barling, freshman in art and business, passes the foun- 
tains near Farrell Library Wednesday afternoon. 



Bud's Mystery of the Week: 




The Search 

for 

Caren Concern 

Authorities are sending a plea to the 

good citizens of the KSU community 

for the safe capture of Caren Concern 

Ms. Concern is wanted- for tail! 

previously volunteer for the F0NE 

Crisis Center. She has been 

described as a caring 

individual with a desire 

to help others in need. 

Please help Bud 

(pictured at lell) 

in his search by calling 
532-6565 

if you know anyone 
who (its this description. 



FACULTY AND STAFF MEMBERS: 

Don't be left out of the 1987-1988 
K-State Campus Directory. 

Be sure to get your 1987-1988 K-State Campus Directory listing 
updated. Personnel Services provides the faculty /staff list for the 
directory and if individuals have not updated their records, the 
directory entry is inaccurate. We would like your assistance in 
updating the faculty /staff listings. 

The following information is needed for individual listihfefe name, 
home address, campu's addfcss, home phone, campus phonc?ftculty/ 
staff title, and office/ department/division. 

Please take a few minutes to check last year's directory. If anything 
has changed, form PER 39 must be completed and submitted to 
Personnel Services by Aug. 28. Aug. 28 is also the deadline to submit 
individual "Personnel Appointment" forms (PER 39) for 
unclassified and classified individuals and GST forms for graduate 
student employees. 

Anyone wishing to withhold his or her name from the directory 
must submit a letter to Personnel Services by Aug, 28. 

If you have questions, please contact Sheila in Personnel 
Services, Employee Benefits and Records, 532-6277. 




WE'VE GOT THE BEST 
COMIC BOOKS IN TOWN! 




1205 M0R0 • AGGIEVILLE 



... has everything for the comic collector . . . 
New books every Monday 

WE ALSO HAVE WAR GAMES - ROLE PLAYING - D & D - 
SF/FANTASY AND COMIC PAPERBACKS, T-SHIRTS AND POSTERS 




ICAT 

Students That Back The Cats 

ICAT Membership Function 

Sunday, Aug. 30, 7 p.m. 

at Kite's Bar & Grill 

All ages admitted 

This will be an excellent chance to talk with the 
athletes and coaches. Head Football Coach Stan 
Parrish will speak, so come to Kite's and get fired up 
for a great fall semester. If you're not a member of 
ICAT yet, this will be a super time to join. 

Upcoming Events 

Sept. 4, 7 p.m. - Kickoff "87 in Aggieville. ICAT will 
co-sponsor this pep rally in Aggieville on the eve of 
the first football game of the year. 25* Hotdogs and 
FREE watermelon will be served. Willie the Wildcat, 
the K-State marching band, the players and coaches 
and hundreds of fans will join together for a evening 
of K-State enthusiam. 

Sept. 5, 4 p.m. - What a day in KSU Stadium! A 
Catbacker Barbecue will be held from 4-5:30 p.m. on 
the grassy area northeast of the football offices. Cost 
of the meal is only $3. KSU and Austin Peay State 
kickoff at 6 p.m., and following the game Willie 
Nelson will perform a concert. On Sept. 5, KSU 
Stadium will definitely be the place to be! 

Look for our table in the Union 

Thurs. & Fri. 

for further information. 





ELIGIBILITY FOR CARE 

AT 

LAFENE STUDENT 

HEALTH CENTER 



Health fees are established upon the recommendation of the 
Student Senate with approval by the Board of Regents. 
All students who are enrolled and attending classes during a 
regular semester or summer session who have paid health fees 
are eligible for care. 

Those enrolled in Special Courses, for varying periods of time. 
who have made previous arrangements for health care 
coverage at Lafene are eligible for care. {Lists of these students 
must be furnished prior to being seen at Lafene.) 
Only students, who have paid the health fee, may elect to have 
their spouse also covered at Lafene; however, they must pay 
the spouse fee within 10 days of the time their own health tees 
are paid. (Children cannot be seen ) 

Emergency care, prior to referral, wilt be given anyone who 
comes m 

Students enrolled in 6 hours or less, electing not to pay the 
health fee during the Fall or Spring semesters, who wish to be 
seen, will be charged $20 for each office visit. This charge 
continues until the full health fee has been exceeded, then that 
student will be afforded the same privileges as the regular fee 
paying student for the remainder of that semester. 
Students who were enrolled m the Spring and pre-enrolled for 
the Fall semester but not attending summer school may pay $15 
and be eligible for care during the summer. This fee may be 
paid within 30 days prior to summer registration and ends the 
day classes begin A late fee of $20 will be accepted for the 
remainder of the summer 
8. Health tees are good until 12 o'clock the night the next semester 
begins. 



NOTE In addition to the above mentioned fees, there are minimal 
charges for certain supplies and services and the charges 
are subject to change without prior notice 

Advertisement 



» — 



"• 



Africans continue strike 



KANSAS STAT1 COLLEGIAN, Tluirwtay, August 27, 1«7 



By Th# Associated Prws 

JOHANNESBURG. Soulh Africa 
— The National Union of Minew- 
orkers voted Wednesday to continue 
a 17-day-old strike, rejecting an offer 
by the top mining companies that 
slightly improved benefits but not 
wages. 

A grim-faced union general - 
secretary Cyril Ramaphosa read a 
statement prepared by union leaders 
at a two-hour meeting that followed 
daylong voting by thousands of black 
miners on the offer from the Cham- 
ber of Mines, which represents the 
top mining companies. 

'The telex that we transmitted to 
the chamber was to inform them thai 
our entire membership on the strik- 
ing mines has decided not to accept 
the chamber's offer," Ramaphosa 
said. 

Hundreds of thousands of miners 
voted by show of hands in hostels 
and unions halls in South Africa's 



longest and costliest mine strike. 

"The reaction of the workers has 
shown that they are rejecting the 
offer," National Union of Minework- 
ers President James Moilatsi had said 
earlier in an interview in western 
Transvaal province. "The ball is in 
the chamber's court" 

The management offer would 
have slightly improved death bene- 
fits and holiday pay, but it did not 
address the union's demand for a 30 
percent wage hike, the main reason 
the strike was called 

Ramaphosa said union leadership 
did not recommend approval or 
rejection of the offer. 

The union planned to reply Wed- 
nesday night to the management 
offer. 

Union officials say 340,000 min- 
ers are on strike at 45 gold and coal 
mines in the biggest legal walkout in 
the country's history. The chamber 
puis the number of strikers at 
210,000 at 29 mines. 



Representatives of the union and 
the chamber met for four hours Tues- 
day in the first contract negotiations 
since the strike began Aug. 9. 

"The union negotiating team is 
clearly not happy that the issue of 
wages was not discussed," Rama- 
phosa told a news conference Tues- 
day night. 

The chamber offered to increase 
by 10 percent the pay miners receive 
when they arc on their annual leave, 
but they would not get any additional 
vacation days, which the union had 
demanded. Miners receive only a 
portion of their regular pay when 
they are on vacation. 

The chamber also offered to raise 
death benefits from two limes a min- 
er's annual salary to four times that 
amount, by increasing the contribu- 
tions of both the employees and 
management. 

The union wanted death benefits 
increased to five times a miner's 
annual pay. The union made no calls 



for increased vacation pay. 

The chamber also ignored union 
demands for danger pay, an increase 
in annual leave to 30 days from the 
current average of 14 to 2 1 days, and 
recognition of the anniversary of the 
1976 Sowcto riots, June 16, as a paid 
holiday. 

The chamber had said that if the 
union did not accept the offer by 
Wednesday night, it would be 
withdrawn. 

The chamber repeatedly said it 
will not negotiate a further increase 
beyond raises of between 15 percent 
and 23.4 percent which it imple- 
mented July 1. The annual inflation 
rate in South Africa is 17 percent 

Anglo American Corp., the coun- 
try's biggest gold producer and the 
enterprise worst hit by the strike, sus- 
pended its back-to-work ultimatums 
until union balloting was completed. 
Anglo fired about 7,000 strikers last 
week and threatened an additional 
30,000 workers with dismissal. 



K-State After Hours 
gives opportunities 



By The Coll»Qlon Staff 

For people with daytime obli- 
gations, the K-State After Hours 
program offers the opportunity to 
begin or further a college 
education. 

Enrollment for the program, 
which offers classes beginning no 
earlier than 4:30 p.m., began Aug. 
24 and concludes today from 4-7 
p.m. in the Union. 

K- State has been offering even- 
ing courses for several years, but 
last spring was the first semester 
the courses were presented as a 
package, said Peg Wherry, coor- 
dinator of the enrollment 
program. 

She said the program offers a 
wide selection of courses that 
apply toward a variety of degrees. 
Virtually all the evening courses 
offered are listed in the daytime 



line schedule. 

The classes are usually held 
one night a week for TA to three 
hours or twice a week for about 
one hour. 

The program has had steady 
enrollment increases, said 
Wherry. 

This may be due i n pan to A fter 
Hours' informational meetings 
called "college nights." They are 
designed to help people interested 
in continuing their education to 
lake the first step. 

"The college nights are similar 
to college nights in high school," 
Wherry said, "but they only 
inform the participants of prog- 
rams at K-Slate." 

Students taking daytime clas- 
ses who want to enroll in evening 
courses follow normal enrollment 
procedures, she said. 




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WELCOME BACK K-STATE 

Need a cool study break? 

C'mon down to 

THE KREEM KUP 




Many Diltekws Flivors 

LOCATEO ONE MILE SOUTH OF CAMPUS 

NEXT TO OLD TOWN MALL 

Opan WMkdiyi and Siturtay B:30 1 m-1000 1 m Sunfliy 11 30 a.m. -10:00 p.m. 



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Lutheran Students 

Picnic 

Meet New People ! 

Discussion 

Meet At 

1021 Denison 

ECM Center. 



LAFEMME 

(GYN/Family Planning) 

CLINIC: 

Available Si fces 
Birth Co 
Informa 
Prescriptiq 
Pregnan 
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Ref 
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logical Exams 
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Sexually Transmitted 
Disease Information 

LAFENE 

HEALTH CENTER 

"Your Medical Facility" 

532-6554 




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OUTDOOR EQUIPMENT SPECIALISTS 

Bicycles • Backpacks 

Shorts & Shirts 
Boots • Tents • Knives 
Jf Sailboards • Canoes 

^ Sleeping Bags 

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Hours: Mon. -Fri. 9-6; Thurs. 9-8; Sal. 9-5 




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A Week -At 

ftANSAS STATE 




At 12:01 a.m. on a Sunday morning in October 1986. a camera shutter was 
clicked. What happened during ihe next 192 hours was called AWAKS I A Week 
at Kansas Slate) 

Former Kansas Stale University photographers were given the opportunity to 
return iti campus lo make pictures of college life in the '80s as it existed lor one 
week during October 

Kansas Slate has numerous alumni photographers in positions til prominence 
throughout the country Some 30 alumni and nearly 15 current student 
photographers made up the AWAKS shooting team. The result of exposing 1 .900 
nills of black-and-while and color film with more than 68.000 exposures is a 
]0-by- 14-inch coffee-table book lo be published in September 1987. You can 
relive the experience of attending college in the 1980s at the nation's first 
land -grand institution through the pages of this special edition. 



See ordering information below 




A Week. At 

jfcANSAS STATE 



Please send mc 



copies of A Week At 



Kansm State ai $25.00 each, plus $2.50 shipping 
and handling. Kansas residents must add $151 
for sales tax {$29.01 for Kansas residents, 
including shipping; $27.50, including shipping 
lor non-residents). Make checks payable to: 
Student Publications Inc., AWAKS Book 
Orders, Kedzie Hall 103. Kansas Slate Univer- 
sity, Manhattan, KS 66506. For more informa- 
tion, please write or call (913) 532-6555 between 
8 a.m. and 5 pm. Monday through Friday. 

©Student Publications Inc.. 1987 
ISBN Number is 0-943 101 -00-X. 

Send to: 



Gift copies. Please mail 
persons indicated below: 



AWAKS books to 



Name 



Mailing Address. 
City . 



Stale. 



.Zip. 



Name 



Mailing Address. 



City 



Stale. 



.Zip- 



Name 



Name . 



Mailing Address, 
City 



Slate. 



-Zip_ 



Mailing Address 

City State. 



.Zip. 



MM 



— ~. 



KANSAS STATI COLLIOIAM. Thurwfy, Awgurt 27, 1SST 



Eldridge won't testify in fraud case 

Trial continues, moves into day 2 



By Ths Associated Press 

TOPEKA ■ ■ Lomi Anderson 
Eldridge declined in a statement she 
gave New England Mutual Life 
Insurance Co. two years ago to dis- 
cuss the death of her first husband, 
Martin Anderson, but confirmed she 
had discussed having him lulled 
when she pleaded guilty to soliciting 
his death. 

Eldridge will not testify in a case 
being heard in federal district court 
here to determine whether the com- 
pany must pay off on an insurance 
policy Anderson bought in the spring 
of 1983, six months before he was 
lulled. 

However, statements she gave to 
the company and to the court in 
August 1985 were read into the 
record of the trial Wednesday, the 
second day of testimony in a case that 
will determine if New England 
Mutual must pay four Anderson 
children proceeds from the policy. 

In a deposition given to the com- 
pany when she made claim for the 
proceeds to be paid to her, Eldridge 
declined to answer any questions 
about the death of Martin Anderson, 
saying it might tend to incriminate 
her. 

However, in transcripts of the pro- 
ceedings when she pleaded guilty to 
two counts of solicitation in connec- 
tion with Anderson's death, Eldridge 
confirmed she met with Thomas 



Bird, a former Emporia minister, and 
Darrell and Dan Carter, two Emporia 
brothers, on several occasions in 
1983 to discuss ways to kill her hus- 
band so she could marry Bird, her 
lover. 

She said in those pleadings that 
she agreed to give Dan Carter, who 
then lived in Emporia, $5,000 to be 
paid to another man who had agreed 
to find someone who would kill 
Anderson. She said in that statement 
that Bird gave her the $5,000. The 
plot never materialized, other testi- 
mony has shown. 

Geary County Sheriff William 
Dcppish testified Tuesday thaiLoma 
Anderson told him the night of her 
husband's death that Bird was the 
man in a ski mask who shot Martin 
Anderson to death in a field south of 
Manhattan in November 1983 

However, his testimony has not 
been corroborated by any other wit- 
nesses at this trial, and Bird has never 
been charged with Martin Ander- 
son's death. Eldridge was charged 
with murder earlier this year in the 
death of her husband. No trial has 
been scheduled, 

Asked during his examination 
whether Lorna Anderson identified 
the gunman on the night Martin died, 
Deppish replied, "She advised us that 
it was the Rev. Tom Bird." 



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The tradition continues 

q> 1 pitchers 
$1 COVER 

Guest DJ The KAPPAS 

You must be 20 years old to be admitted and 21 to drink 





The Men of Delta Tau Delta 

cordially invite 
all K-State women to their 

Little Sister Rush Party 

Tonight, 8 p.m. 
, Delta Tau Delta House, 
1001 Sunset 




ioccer Officials 

Rec Services is hiring!! 
Attend these meetings: 

1. Tuesday. Sept. 1 at 6:30 p.m. 
K-State Union, Room 209 

2. Wednesday, Sept, 2 at 6:30 p.m. 
K-State Union, Room 209 

This is Your Chance!! 



Deppish also said Lorna Anderson 
denied she plotted with Bird to kill 
Anderson at that time, but acknow- 
ledged they had laid other plans for 
having him killed. 

Also read into the record Wednes- 
day was Eldridge' s statement of 
November 1986 in which she waived 
her claim to the insurance policy pro- 
ceeds and asked that they be given to 
her four daughters by Anderson. 

The plaintiff insurance company, 
which wants the jury to find the 
insurance policy null and void 
because of Eldridge' s alleged role in 
Anderson's death, is scheduled to 
call its final witness Thursday, after 
calling seven witnesses Tuesday and 
Wednesday. 

Since the final company witness 
was not yet available, defense attor- 
ney Edward Hund of Wichita, who is 



representing Eldridge and the Ander- 
son girls in the trial, called his first 
three witnesses Wednesday. 

Hund called Jerry Briggs, an 
Emporia insurance agent for another 
company who sold the Andersons an 
insurance policy in 1980; Loren Sla- 
ter of Hutchinson, Eldridge's father 
and grandfather of the four girls, and 
Steve Anderson of Lawrence, the 
dead man's brother who is chairman 
of the Department of Music and 
Dance at the University of Kansas. 

Briggs said he sold Martin Ander- 
son a consolidated policy that pro- 
vided $134,000 worth of insurance 
for the entire Anderson family in 
1980, and that Martin provided all 
the information needed to process the 
application. He said Lorna was not 
involved. 

Briggs testified he thought Ander- 



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•Two single albums or casettes 

•RAPC0 guitar cord 

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son believed deeply in the impor- 
tance of insurance as a means of pro- 
viding financial security for his 
family. 

Slater, a loan officer for Hutchin- 
son National Bank, testified that 
Martin Anderson had taken out 10 to 
12 loans from the bank during the 
years of his marriage to Lorna and 
that each time he had purchased cre- 
dit life insurance. 

"Marty always wanted to be sure 
his estate or Lorna wouldn't have to 
pay off the loans," Slater said. 

Steve Anderson told of discussing 
life insurance with Martin in the ear- 
ly 1980s, with his brother seeking 
advice on the wisdom of consolidat- 
ing policies. 

"Marty was always one to have 
life insurance and to be concerned 
about it," Steve Anderson said. 



Hund contended in his opening 
statement Tuesday that Martin 
Anderson was a firm believer in 
insurance, that he purchased the poli- 
cy in dispute himself and owned it 
himself and that any involvement by 
Lorna in his death is irrelevant to the 
issueof whether it was a valid policy. 

Torrance Crcbs, New England 
Mutual's attorney, argued Eldridge 
instigated obtaining the last policy on 
Anderson's life in 1983, then plotted 
his death to gain the proceeds from 
that policy. That constitutes fraud 
and should render the policy void, he 
said. 

However, a claims processor for 
New England Mutual conceded 
under cross examination Wednesday 
that Lorna didn't apply for the insur- 
ance policy in controversy. 

The statements of John E. Seof- 
ford of Boston, who handles claims 
for the company, came during the 
second day of testimony. 



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KSU RODEO 
WELCOME 

BARBECUE 

Thursday, August 27 

7 p.m. 
3002 SUgg Hill Rd. 

It will be an informal evening of outdoor fun. 
Anyone interested in joining or learning more about the 
KSU rodeo program is welcome. 

'This program is for both contestants and nOh-coh testing 
rodeo enthusiasts. 

Bring yourself, a friend, and the beverage of your choice. All 
else will be provided. 

There will be an executive meeting at 6:30. All new officers 
are expected to attend. 

Team member card applications and eligibility forms will 
also be distributed. Team members, BE THERE. 




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• Argyle socks 

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• Suspenders 

• Athletic cut suits 

• Cotton sweaters 

• Pinpoint Oxford dress suits 

• Pleated trousers 

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~* 



mm 



KANSAS STATI COLLEGIAN. Thursday, AufluM 27. 1987 




Stiff/Sieve Wotgm 



Plenty of puddles 

Puddles formed by heavy rains Tuesday and Wednesday reflect Bob Kingsley, freshman in construc- 
tion science, as he walks home Wednesday afternoon. Continued rain is forecast for this morning. 



County pays medical bill 



By Tho Assocloted Press 

TOPEKA — Attorney General 
Robert T. Stephan held in a legal 
opinion made public Wednesday that 
Shawnee County must pay the medi- 
cal bills of a man arrested by the Kan- 
sas Highway Patrol after he was 
injured at the end of a high-speed 
chase on the Kansas Turnpike. 

Stephan said a two-year-old state 
Supreme Court decision in a Sedg- 
wick County case, determining who 
has to pay the bills of indigent offen- 
ders, applied in this case. 

In that decision, made in July 
1985, the court said Sedgwick Coun- 
ty was liable for more than SI 9,000 
in medical bills for George Rainey 
because he was arrested on state 
charges after being wounded in a 



shootout with law officers in Wichi- 
ta. The shootout followed the slaying 
of a Highway Patrol trooper on the 
turnpike in July 1981. 

If Rainey had been arrested on city 
charges, the city of Wichita would 
have had to pay the medical bills, the 
court held. 

Stephan said the same thing 
applies in the case of Michael W. 
Cork, who was arrested last May 14 
after his car crashed at a Topeka exit. 
The Highway Patrol troopers gave 
chase after Cork failed to pay for 
gasoline at the Topeka service area, 
and a check revealed his car had been 
stolen in Tempe, Ariz. 

Cork was arrested at the scene, 
then transported to a local hospital 



for treatment of facial lacerations. A 
trooper accompanied him to the hos- 
pital, then transferred him to the 
Shawnee County jail where he was 
held on state charges. 

Stephan said it was immaterial 
whether the Highway Patrol or local 
law enforcement officials arrested 
Cork, because the state charges were 
the controlling factor under the 
Supreme Court ruling. If city charges 
had been brought against him, the 
city of Topeka would have had to 
foot the bill. 

"Medical costs incurred by an 
indigent offender before or at the 
time of arrest are to be borne by the 
county if the offender is subsequent- 
ly charged with a violation of state 
law," Stephan wrote. 



General Motors plant closes; 
loss of 4,000 jobs estimated 



By The Associated Press 

NORWOOD, Ohio — The last car 
moved down the assembly line here 
Wednesday marking the end of a 
64-year-old tie between General 
Motors Corp. and the city, and the 
end of more than 4,000 jobs. 

"People are having to think right 
now what they're doing with their 
lives. They're having to cope with 
the shock," said Clcon Montgomery, 
a United Auto Workers union 
official, 

"They're really emotional. 
They're having to say goodbye to 
friends, realizing they're not going to 
say hi in the morning," said Mont- 
gomery, who is helping direct a job 
retraining center. 

The last car, a Chevrolet Camaro, 
was expected to be finished Wednes- 
day evening, said GM spokeswoman 
Betsy Hayhow. 

The closing is the fust of 1 1 com- 
plete or partial plant closings nation- 



wide thatGM announced in Novem- 
ber 1 986. which will cost the jobs of 
29,000 employees. Company offi- 
cials said the closings are part of a 
S10 billion reorganization to cut 
operating costs and shut down excess 
production capacity. 

The Norwood plant was the largest 
employer in this Cincinnati suburb of 
26,000 people, which already has cut 
its budget and laid off some of its 
own workers. The city received $2.6 
million a year, or 28 percent of its 
budget, from a tax on the GM 
payroll. 

GM has guaranteed that the city 
will get the full amount of payroll tax 
revenue this year, but it rejected city 
and school district requests for addi- 
tional, transitional funds. 

GM plans to close another south- 
western Ohio auto plant, the Fairfield 
parts stamping plant, by 1989. That 
will cost 2,500 more jobs. 

Douglas Smith, 45, a 23-ycar Nor- 
wood plant employee, shook hands 



and said goodbye to his friends Wed- 
nesday morning at the UAW Local 
674 hall, a block from the 60-acrc 
plant site. Smith's wife, Elnora, a car 
painter for 1 1 years, is a[so losing her 
job at the Norwood plant. 

"No one ever believed that this 
would ever happen, with an organi- 
zation this big," Smith said. "My 
expectations were, if I lived long 
enough, to retire with GM." 

The plant is due for inspection 
today and then about 750 of its hour- 
ly workers will continue working for 
approximately two months to 
remove equipment and prepare the 
facility for sale. GM hopes to sell the 
site to a developer. 

Under GM's contract with the 
UAW, eligible hourly plant workers 
can receive as much as 95 percent of 
their take-home pay — when com- 
bined with state unemployment com- 
pensation — for up to two years in 
supplemental unemployment 
benefits. 



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Coming to Cofege 
on a Budget? 

WE OFFER 

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GROUND SCHOOL INFORMATION 

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$5/hour, IFR Simulator 



Membership available to KSU students, alumni, faculty and staff 
Hugh Irvin, 539-3128 or 532-6311 for information. 




Maybe it's your calculator. 



It's certainly not an HP. 

A cheap calculator can cost you plenty. But a Hewlett- 
Packard pays. Time and again. And now through 
October 31, HP is offering a deal that'll keep on paying 
long after you turn in that exam. 

Ask us about: 

■ $10 rebate on the HP-12C financial calculator 

■ A FREE HP-41 Advantage Module ($49 value) with 
purchase of every HP-41 Advanced Scientific 
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OUTDOOR IQM fMt MT IWC U mi l 



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Aggieville 



Hours: Mon.-Fri. 9-6, Thurs. 9-8, Sat. 9-5 



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KANSAS STATE COLLSQIAW. Hwctay, Awgwrt *?> i ** T 



Compromise eludes 
gulf states despite 
attempts at peace 



By The Associated Press 

NICOSIA, Cyprus Iran 

accused the United States and Arab 
nations Wednesday of trying to 
impose an "ignominious peace," and 
rejected any compromise in its 
7-year-old war with Iraq. 

Sandstorms swept the Persian 
Gulf, drastically reducing visibility. 
Shipping executives puzzled over the 
whereabouts of another convoy of 
Kuwaiti tankers and U.S. Navy 
escorts, or whether it was underway 
at all. 

The comments by Prime Minister 
Hussein Musavi of Iran appeared to 
be a reaction to an Arab League ulti- 
matum Tuesday that Iran accept a 
July 20 cease-Are resolution by the 
U.N. Security Council by Sept. 20 or 
risk a mass break in relations by Arab 
nations. 

His remarks, reported by Iran's 
official Islamic Republic News 
Agency, made no direct reference to 
the demand. 

In the United States, deputy State 
Department spokeswoman Phyllis 
Oakley said Wednesday: "Unless the 
Iranians officially indicate their 
acceptance very soon, we believe the 
U.N. Security Council must move 
ahead to consider enforcement 
measures." 

U.S. delegates are consulting with 
other members of the 1 5 -nation 
council about imposing sanctions on 
Iran for failing to comply with the 



resolution, which the Keagan admi- 
nistration shepherded through the 
council 

Iraq has not attacked shipping in 
the gulf since the resolution was 
passed. Its news agency praised the 
Arab League action and called Wed- 
nesday for a boycott of Iran that 
would force it "to accept a com- 
prehensive and lasting peace" in line 
with the U.N. resolution. 

President Saddam Hussein started 
the war with an invasion of Iran in 
September 1980, but has been seek- 
ing a negotiated settlement for sever- 
al years. 

The Iraqi news agency said Hus- 
sein and his ruling Revolutionary 
Command Council "called on Arab 
countries to further toughen the joint 
Arab stand against the Iranian 
aggression." 

Iran is ethnically Persian, not 
Arab. It shares the Moslem religion 
with the Arabs, but Iranians belong to 
the minority Shiiie sect that has been 
at odds with the predominant Sunni 
branch of Islam for 1,300 yean. 

1RNA quoted Musavi as saying 
the United States, by intervening in 
the gulf, seeks to impose "an ignom- 
inious peace" on Iran "in collabora- 
tion with Arab reactionaries." 

"We will never agree to such a 
peace," he said. "Even a psychologi- 
cal war cannot make us accept a com- 
promise to the benefit of the United 
Stales." 



UDOT/'n irdvs 



WELCOMES YOU TO WILDCAT LAND! 

We can take care of all your personal 
beauty needs from head to toe. 

r 

•13 Haircuts •*• 

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Mutt ask tor an Artistic Hair Designer 

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♦10 OFF on European Facial 

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. Expires 9- 15-87 



TANNING BEDS AVAILABLE-»30 for 12 ••••ions 



mEDKEN* 



218 So 4th 
776-5651 



...S£ARCH 

LABORATORIES 



FREE! 



Guitar and 
Bass Strings 
that are worth 
up to S25 00 




00** 




Offer includes J 



BELIEVE IT! 

(no strings attached) 
•Acoustics»Electrics 
• 12 Strings»Basses 



FREE STRING COUPON 

WHEN - This Sat., Aug. 29 

TIME - 1 1 a.m.-3:30 p.m. 

WHERE 

S.M. HANSON MUSIC INC. 

316 Poyntz (Downtown Manhattan) 
776-3000 

Limit One Guitar Per Person 

You must be present while strings are installed 

TEAR OUT AND FILL IN THIS COUPON 

BRING YOUR GUITAR AND COUPON 

TO S.M. HANSON MUSIC INC. 

I 
Name r . 

Phone — 



Address 

Guitar Brand 



Type: ElectO AcousticO BassO 12 StgO 



KS2 



Rolling Thunder's Biggest Ever 






i Qx * 



I 



■ 



Announcing Rolling Thunders biggest 30-Hour Sale beginning at 9 a.m. tomorrow. 
30 hours ol bargain prices on home hi-fi components by Marantz, Sherwood, JVC 
Onkyo Mission and more. 30 hours of really small prices on Alpine, Sony, Sherwood 
JVC car stereo components and Alpine car alarms plus special deals each hour for 
30 hours Pick your own payment plan: MasterCard, Discover Card, Visa, American 
Express Lay-away and financing to qualified buyers. $20 holds any item. 



Only at Rolling Thunder of Manhattan, 1126 Moro in Aggieville 



9-10 am. Fit, Aug. 28 



3210 

Car Equalizer 36 watts 



Reg. $130 
All 29 Hours $99 

1 HOUR ONLY $59.88 



1-2 p.m. Frl., Aug. 28 
Ogitrac 10OE 



Replace Youf Ok) Needle Now with a New 

Diamond Tip 

Reg $100 

All 29 Mount $41 

1 HOUR ONLY $29.88 



MIL fit, Aug. 28 

maxell 

UDS11-M 




Chrome Bias 90 mm. tape 
Reg Price $3 00 
All 29 Hours $2 39 
1 HOUR ONLY $1.88 ea. 



2-3 p.m. Frt, Aug. 28 

•ILPINE 



5-6 p.m. Frt., Aug. 28 

AUDIO PULSE 
Digital Booksrietl Loudspeaker 

r* • '*» ** - f 



Reg $100 ea 
AU 29 Hours $8995 ea 

1 HOUR ONLY $66 ea. 



9-10 am Sat., Aug. 29 

JVC 

spswd rg 




r^^ 



Model 8007 "*' 

Meoa unit Alorm tnie'foce 

Alarm installed in your car 

Reg $270 

All 29 Hours $219 

1 HOUR ONLY $188.88 



11 a.m.*NO0!t Frt., Aug. 28 



JVC 

ALA1BK 



Noon-1 p.m. Frt., Aug. 28 




Turntable 
Semi Automatic Component Turntable 
Reg. $105 
All 29 Hours $92 
1 HOUR ONLY $78.88 



3-4 p.m. Frt, Aug. 28 
SHERWOOD EQA280 




6-7 p.m. Frt., Aug. 28 
SHERWOOD CRD210 




Reg Price $300.00 
All 29 Hours $279.00 

1 HOUR ONLY $237.00 



10-11 am Sat., Aug. 29 
3510 



Car Stereo Graptuc 7 Band Equalizer with Hi 

power 

Reg Price $100 00 

All 29 Hours $90 00 

1 HOUR ONLY $81 



7-8 p.m. Frl, Aug. 28 
<(l>COUStlC 503 



4| court* 




Digital Hi Power Auto Rev Tape Deck 

Reg. $21995 

All 29 Hours $180 

1 HOUR ONLY $151 



4-5 pm Frt, Aug. 28 

A1365 

Oak Front 
Audio Cabinet 



1 
1 



II 




AM-FM Cassette 
In-dasn Auto Reverse 
Reg Price $130 
All 29 Hours $109 
1 HOUR ONLY $89.88 



- ' Reg $220 

AH 29 Hours $200 

1 HOUR ONLY $168.88 
8-9 p.m. Frt, Aug. 26 

ONKYO TAR22 




12 tn Wooter Pump Inside this 3-way Speaker 

Reg Price $135 00 each 

All 29 Hours $122 50 each 

1 HOUR ONLY tW.M Wh 



1-2 p.m. Sat, Aug. 29 



ii.!immHnimiKii 



SENTREK 20 band Graph* 
Equator, display with Spectrum 

Reg $130 
AJ 29 Hours $109 

1 HOUR ONLY $89.88 



5-6 p.m. Sat., Aug, 29 

4P court* 





Car Stem Pow* *mfl a, 'B- ? 2 Watts Power 
Reg Price $130 00 
AH 29 Hours S120 00 
1 HOUR ONLY $105 00 



2-3 p.m. Sat., Aug. 29 

ONKYO DX130 

Compact Oisc Player 




Reg $320 

All 29 Hours $260 

1 HOUR ONLY $239.88 



6-7 p.m. Sat., Aug. 29 
MARANTZ SR360 



11 am-Noon SaL, Aug. 29 
COBRA 3100 



Radar Detector Supei Mot Design 

Reg Price $170 00 

All 29 Hours $150 00 

1 HOUR ONLY $137.88 



3-4 p.m. Sat., Aug. 
SONY XR-6100 



29 







Digttat-Auto Reverse-AM/FM Car 

Cassette Deck 

Reg $229.96 

All 29 Hours $209 95 

1 HOUR ONLY $189.88 



6x9 100 watt car speakers 

Reg. $100 pr. 

All 29 Hours $88 pr. 



1 HOUR ONLY $71 pr. 




AM/F M 70 watt total receiver 

Reg $240 

All 29 Hours $219 

1 HOUR ONLY $189.88 



7-8 p.m. Sat, Aug. 29 

WILD CARD 
HOUR 

ANY PREVIOUS HOURLY SPECIAL 

PROVIDED WE HAVE IT 

IN "STOCK'' 



11 a.m.-Noon Sun., Aug. 30 
/1LPINE. 7263 



hpower AMf M cassette decks 
with auio reverse 

Reg $300 

AH 29 Hours $279 

1 HOUR ONLY $247 



2-3 pm Sun., Aug. 30 



-(i%gonmd 
by MISSION 

OUR BEST 

Reg Price Si 500 pr 
All 29 Hours Si 389 00 

1 HOUR ONLY $995.00 




V a*ss tubes Br jt4t* ' 

Bass Tubas by SAS 

Fordean Dynamic Bass 

Reg. $220 

All 29 Hours $209 

1 HOUR ONLY $197 



3-4 p.m. Sun, Aug 



30 



JVC 



XLV250 



New designer compact disc player 

Reg. $300 

All 29 Hours $279 

1 HOUR ONLY $219.88 



Stereo Cassette Deck 

Auio Reverse Full Logic 

Reg $300 

All 29 Hours $260 

1 HOUR ONLY $239.88 



Noon-1 p.m Sat, Aug. 29 
OOUStlC Amp 100 




Car Stereo BoosteffAmp 50 Watt Total Power 

Reg Price $75 

All 29 Hours $63 

1 HOUR ONLY $48.88 



4-5 p.m. Sat, Aug. 29 

/LPINE 



7901 



Car AM-FM compact 
disc player 




Reg $650 
All 29 Hours $615 

1 HOUR ONLY $585 



8-9 p.m. Sat, Aug. 29 




4-indi hi-power coaxial car speaker 

Reg $80 

All 29 Hours $59.95 

1 HOUR ONLY $41.88 



1-2 pm Sun, Aug. 30 




Speaker system tor full sae pickups 

Reg $300 

AH 29 Hours $269 

1 HOUR ONLY $267 

4-5 p.m. Sun, Aug. 30 



Replacement 
dash speakers 



• • 



Reg $60 

All 29 Hours $49 
1 HOUR ONLY $39.88 



' ROLLING 
THUNDER 



7^ 



i 



HOLDS ANY ITEM 
ON SALE 

1126 Moro, Aggieville 

776-5507 

All Hems may not be exactly as pictured 
All on a lirsl-come, first-serve basis and limited to store stock. 



■ * ' . 



^m- w m i i 



KANSAS STATE COLLSOIAH, Thura4*y, Aufltit 27. 1M7 



11 



Officials examine cockpit discipline 



By Th» Associated Press 

WASHINGTON - Wilh pilot 
error developing ss the most likely 
culprit, the recent Northwest Airlines 
crash is raising questions about cock- 
pit discipline and how flight crews 
battle comptacency amid highly 
repetitive routines. 

Aviation psychologists have been 
concerned about flight crew coordi- 
nation in commercial airliners for 
years, including increasing evidence 
of a danger of complacency in cock- 
pits that are highly automated and 
where critical chores become a mat- 
ter of habit. 



Federal aviation accident investi- 
gators say more than 80 percent of 
the airline accidents involve human 
error. About 40 percent of the time 
the mistake is made in the cockpit, 
according to statistics from the 
National Transportation Safely 
Board. 

A rash of embarrassing miscues, 
including two that nearly caused air 
tragedies, brought attention to Delta 
Air Lines earlier this summer. 

Investigators believe the likely 
reason for the Aug. 16 crash of 
Northwest Flight 255 on takeoff 
from Detroit, which killed 156 peo- 
ple, was the failure of the flight crew 



to properly set the wing flaps, a basic 
chore of flying, critical to get the 
plane safely airborne. 

Why are such mistakes made? 

The Federal Aviation Administra- 
tion is bringing together chief pilots 
of the nation's airlines for a meeting 
Thursday in Kansas City, Mo., to dis- 
cuss the problems, which have been 
the topic of aviation literature for 
years, 

"We must return to the basics — 
the basics that put all of us in the left 
(captain's) seat, in a word, our pro- 



fessionalism," FAA Administrator 
Allan McAnor recently told an Air 
Line Pilots Association safety 
seminar. 

Since coming to the FAA last 
month, McAnor has promised a 
"top-io-bottom" review of pilot 
training to reduce the likelihood of 
careless mistakes. 

'The reasons (for a pilot mistake) 
arc probably as extensive as the rea- 
son any person makes a mistake — a 
distraction, fatigue, task overload or 
stress. It can be complacency. It can 



be inexperience," said Clay Foushee, 
a NASA psychologist who special- 
izes in human factors in aviation. 

If the theory that the Northwest 
pilots neglected to set their plane's 
wing flaps holds true, it will not be 
the first time a pilot has forgotten to 
perform one of the most basic pre- 
flight tasks in aviation, according to 
reports filed wilh the National Aero- 
nautics and Space Administration. 

Since 1981, there have been at 
least seven incidents reported 
through NASA's Aviation Safety 



Reporting System in which flaps 
were improperly set for takeoff. In 
six cases, warning alarms sounded 
and the takcoffs were aborted. 

In another incident, the pilot 
noticed the wrong setting too late, but 
adjusted his takeoff speed and lifted 
off successfully. 

Human errors in the cockpit also 
seem to have little relationship to 
experience, according to specialists. 

Two of the Delta incidents this 
year involved senior captains. 



PHI &PPA TAU> 
L/T71E S/STEK 

WH fWtf 

The men of Phi Kappa Tau 

cordially invite 
the Women of K-State 
to a 
little sister rush party 
to be held at our house 

at 1606 Fairchild 
on Thursday, August 27 
at S p.m. 

for questions, escorts, or ridea 
call 53S-74I6 



c Efie c W&rd 

"'is getting 
around . . . 
CAMPUS CRUSADE 

FOR CHRIST 

A dynamic opportunity to 
grow in your Christian faith. 

Meets Thursdays, 7 p.m. 
Throckmorton— Room 131 



BE* 

AROl'M) THE WOK 1.1) 
UK' SIS RISII PARTY ! 





1200 CENTENNIAL DR. 

riK'RSDAY Al'C.l'ST 27. I*)« 
s=<><) P.M. 



THE 

HUMAN WATER 

BALLOON 

SLINGSHOT 

Launches Water Balloons 
More Than A City Block 




FOR MORE INFO AND THE 

LOWEST PRICE IN TOWN 

CALL 

537-4038 



* Aco«* e t0 Ma nlia^ 

^L\ ^O Kun/a Drive-Inns ul Manhattan would like m introduce C2r #ik 

'^^T^fc you in our restaurants In addition in ihe Original Runza ^"^fl) 

^| sandwich we also have one i>J the best hamburger* in town. Some of ~^ 

the other items cm our menu arc polish dogs, fish sandwich, trench tries . and 

homemade on inn rings 

As a token of our welcome (0 you, here are two coupons to use at your 

convenience. These coupons are good at our close to campus 

location at 1101 Moro in Aggievillc. 



' 




1101 Morn 
Aggievillc 



FREE order of 
onion rings with 
purchase of any 

sandwich and 
medium drink 



1 101 Morn 
Agpioillc 



"I 

I 
I 

I 
I 
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( 

I 
I 
I 

r 
i 

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t 
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i 
l 



I *ptu-. Vpt 



livir good *.M.I 
.m ,.lhn t.fl.-f ' 



1 r" 



1 FREE SANDWICH 

ml Mfti t% to— MftM Ht-*» ^ridw*hpuKru*-d> 

With the purvhaw "' any sandwich. 

tries or union rings, and drink 

I 10! Morn 

Aggies ilk- 



RUNZA 



I Etpro* SqM 



I ,' m.hJ « 

irw i-irirF o 



i 
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5 



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RUNZ4 



DRIVE INN 

RE STAURAN T 




: 

* 



UPC 

UNION 

PROGRAM 

COUNCIL 



It-state union 

upc •cl*clle •ntarUlnm*nt 



WELCOME BACK DANCE 

Tomorrow, 9 p.m.-Midnight 

K-State Union Catskeller 

Only $1! 

Music by Best Sound Around 

Come on out 
and meet new friends! 



Get your copy of this unique week-at-a-glance planning 
calendar for only $3. Available at the Bookstore, 
Information Desk, and the Activities Center (K-State Union 
3rd Floor). 



upc promotions 



»*«,•«• »•••*** 



SAILING 

September 12 or 13 

$10 includes lynch and sailing equipment 

Turtle Creek Reservoir/Blue Valley Yacht Club 

WINDSURFING 

September 11 and 12 

$30 includes lunch, windsurfing 

equipment, and certified 

instructors. Tutde Creek River Pond. 

Information meeting, Tuesday. Sept 

1, Union Room 207, 7 p.m 

Sign -up begins Wednesday, Sept. 2, 

Activities Center. 8 a m 4 p.m. 



Jupc outdoor roc. 



Explore the sixteenth century! 
join UPC Travel at the Renaissance Festival on Sept. 19. 
Cost is only $15 which includes round-trip 
transportation to Bonner Springs and one ticket 
for the festival. 

Information meeting, Tuesday, Sept. 1, Union 
Room 208, 7 p.m. 

Sign -up begins Wednesday, Sept. 2. 
Activities Center, 8 am. -4 p.m. 



Ik-state union 
upc travel 



ROPE 



an 



"ROPE is a curious, intellectual drama . 
intriguing movie." 

— Jeffrey Lyons, PBS Sneak Previews 

Today, Little Theatre, 3:30 p.m., 

& Forum Hall, 7:30 p.m. 

$1.75; KSU ID Required; Rated PC. 



h-StatpHpion 

upc kalaiooscc 



BEST PICTURE 

PLATftN 

The first casualty of war is innocence. 



"Stone's film is a document 
written in blood that after almost 
20 years refuses to dry." 

—Richard Corliss, TIME Magazine 
Tomorrow and Saturday, Aug. 29, 

Forum Hall, 7 & 9:30 p.m. 
$1 75; KSU ID Required; Rated R. 



BEDTIME FOR BONZO 
starring Ronald Reagan 

Saturday, Aug. 29, 2 p.m. and 

Sunday, Aug. 30, 2 & 7 p.m. 

All shows In Forum Hall. 

$1.50; KSU ID Required; Rated a 



Jupc 



op* 



WSH&&& 



^ 



12 



KANSAS STATI COUSOIAN, Thyrtctay. Atlgurt 37, 1SS7 



Bonn speeds arms agreement 



^r IB % 



Reagan anticipates 
Soviet conciliation 



By The Associoted Preu 

LOS ANGELES President 

Reagan on Wednesday applauded 
West Germany's willingness to 
destroy its Pershing 1 -A missiles and 
declared that the Soviet Union must 
not "erect additional barriers*' to a 
superpower agreement on the global 
elimination of intermediate-range 
missiles. 

In a speech to the Town Hall of 
California, a civic organization, Rea- 
gan also challenged the Soviet Union 
to bring a spirit of "glasnost" or 
openness to its military affairs and 
said past U.S. -So viet arms pacts have 
been "loo often violated by the 
U.S.S.R." 

The address, billed in advance by 
White House officials as a major 



assessment of U.S.-Soviet relations, 
came as Chancellor Helmut Kohl 
said in Bonn that West Germany will 
destroy rather than modernize its 
Pershing missiles if the superpowers 
scrap all their medium- and shorter- 
range missiles in the Intermediate 
Nuclear Force, or INF, class. 

The Soviet Union has said it would 
not sign a disarmament agreement 
unless it includes the 72 Pershing 
I- A missiles, which are owned by 
West Germany but have nuclear war- 
heads controlled by the United 
States. 

"We can wrap up an agreement on ■ 
intermediate-range nuclear missiles 
promptly," Reagan said. "There are 
still issues to be worked out. Our del- 
egation in Geneva has already 
pointed the way to simplifying verifi- 



cation requirements now that we 
have agreed to the total elimination 
of U.S. and Soviet INF missiles." 

But the president, without men- 
tioning the name of his Soviet coun- 
terpart, Mikhail S. Gorbachev, called 
on the Kremlin to smooth the way 
toward an arms accord 

He said the United States has 
"repeatedly pointed out that the last- 
minute demand by the Soviets con- 
cerning West German Pershing I -A 
missiles was without foundation." 

"Earlier today, Chancellor Kohl 
removed even this artificial obstacle 
from consideration," Reagan said. 
"We are therefore hopeful that the 
Soviet Union will demonstrate that 
there is substance behind the rhetoric 
they have repeated so often of late — 
that they genuinely want a stabilizing 
INF agreement. 

"If so, they will move to meet our 
proposals constructively rather than 
erect additional barriers to 
agreement." 



A senior administration official 
said before the speech that "there was 
absolutely no pressure" brought to 
bear on the Bonn government by 
Washington. 

The president's speech appeared 
to be a new attempt to take the offen- 
sive in the long-running public rela- 
tions struggle with the Kremlin. Gor- 
bachev has scored some major victo- 
ries over Reagan, with recent polls in 
Europe showing that a majority of 
people believe the Soviet leader — 
rather than Reagan — is a champion 
of peace. 

The president pointed out that it 
was the United States — not the 
Kremlin — which originally prop- 
osed elimination of medium-range 
missiles in Europe and a SO percent 
cut in strategic weapons. 

In his speech, Reagan reiterated 
his litany of guideposts the admi- 
nistration will use to measure Soviet 
intentions toward the United States. 

These include the withdrawal of 



Soviet troops from Aghanistan, a 
cessation of Soviet attempts to 
impose its system on other countries, 
destruction of the Berlin Wall and an 
improvement of human rights from 
within and greater independence for 
Eastern European satellites. 




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Sports 

Konsas State Collegian ■ Thursday, August 27, 1987 ■ Page 13 




Brian Ritenour, left, senior in marketing, and Charles Tucker, senior 
in apparel and textile marketing, hold Kris Tulp, senior in journalism 



SufT/Steve Rumuuen 
and mass communications, during practice Wednesday. The squad 
recently won two awards at the UCA College Cheerleading Camp. 



Squad's practice pays off 



By Jeff Ropp 

Sports Editor 



There is a group of athletes at K - 
State who will run, jump, tumble, fly 
high through the air and even roam 
into the stands to lift your spirits and 
entertain you. 

Those athletes are the hard- 
working Wildcats cheerleaders and 
yell leaders. 

"Anymore, cheerleading is not 
just getting out and kicking and 
entertaining. Especially with as 
much practice time that goes into it," 
said Kris Tulp, head cheerleader and 
senior in journalism and mass 
communications. 

Tulp said while cheerleading has 
become an entertainment-oriented 
activity, this year's squad will be pri- 
marily concerned with crowd 
motivation. 

"Cheerleading started to get away 
from what it really should be, which 
is just performing for the crowd. This 
year, we're really going to stress get- 
ting back into the crowd and getting 



them going for the team. 

"It's not going to be just us out 
there putting on a show. This year 
we'll even be running up into the 
stands trying to get the fans on their 
feet and yelling for the team," Tulp 
said. 

The cheerleading squad's new 
sponsor, Scott Johnson, assistant 
instructor of animal science, has 
been involved with the K-Staie 
marching band for quite some time, 
so the band and cheerleaders should 
be working as more of a unit this 
year, Tulp said. 

With the inherent danger from 
being thrown high into the air and 
depending on fellow cheerleaders to 
catch you, working as a unit seems to 
be what cheerleading is all about. 

Tulp said when the squad attended 
the Universal Cheerleading Associa- 
tion summer camp, she noticed quite 
a contrast in safety concerns between 
the Wildcats squad and other squads. 

"We have a tradition where the 
guys just don't ever let the girls hit 
the ground. They will catch us no 



matter what 

"But it's just unbelievable when 
you go to camp, and there are girls 
hitting the ground right and left. It 
makes mc so nervous, because I've 
never been dropped. I've fallen out of 
things, but I've never been dropped 
because we (K-State) arc so safe," 
Tulp said. 

Apparently, the concerns for safe- 
ty arid crowd motivation - along with 
a rigorous practice schedule - paid 
off for the squad at the UCA camp 
just before classes began this fall. 

The squad placed in two of three 
categories in the top division (for 
NCAA Division 1 universities) at the 
camp this session, which is the best a 
K- State team has ever achieved at the 
camp. 

The Wildcat team placed fifth in 
the cheering category and fourth in 
the fight song category in the lop 
division, which included such 
schools as North Carolina Slate Uni- 
versity, the University of Alabama 
and Louisiana Slate University. 



To prepare for the camp, Tulp said 
the team practiced for four days, 
averaging about four to five hours 
per day. Then it was off to Kansas 
City to teach some high school cheer- 
leaders in a mini-camp and to put on 
a performance, which a large sports- 
wear company sponsored. 

The team then traveled to the site 
of the UCA camp in Memphis, 
Tenn., where it practiced from 8 a.m. 
to 8 p.m. daily for five days. Now that 
school has started, the team practices 
two hours every weekday to prepare 
for the football season. 

With the constant practicing and 
traveling, Tulp said close, rewarding 
friendships have evolved between 
squad members. 

"We can talk to each other about 
anything. Because we work with 
each other every day, we're closer to 
each other than a lot of people in our 
families that we never see. We see 
each other every single day, and we 
know each other at our very worst 
and our very best," Tulp said. 



Tennis tiyout 
announced 

K- State women's tennis 
coach Steve Bictau announced 
there will be open tryouts this 
sason for the team. 

Bietau has scheduled the 
tryouts for Saturday, Aug. 29, 
at 8:30 a.m. 

The tryouts will be held at 
the tennis courts adjacent to the 
Chester E. Peters Recreation 
Complex at the L.P. Washburn 
Recreational Area. 

Any student interested 
should contact Beitau by today 
at 5 p.m. by calling him at his 
office telephone number in 
A" hear n Field House, 
532-7198. 



Molitor sees streak end 



By The Associated Press 

MILWAUKEE - - Milwaukee's 
Paul Molitor went O-for-4 against 
Cleveland Wednesday night, ending 
his 39-game hitting streak. 

Molitor was attempting to equal 
Ty Cobb's 40-game streak in 191 1, 
the fourth-longest in modem major- 
league history. 

Molitor failed to get the ball out of 
the infield against Cleveland rookie 
John Farrell, who allowed only three 
hits through nine innings in his sec- 
ond major-league start. 

Molitor struck out in the fust 
inning, grounded into a 6-4-3 double 
play in the third and grounded out to 
shortstop in the sixth. He reached 
base in the eighth on an error by first 



baseman Pat Tabler. 

With two outs in the eighth and a 
runner on second, Molitor hit a slow 
grounder that third baseman Brook 
Jacob/ charged and threw to Tabler. 
First base umpire Mike Reilly origi- 
nally called Molitor out, but ruled 
him safe when Tabler bobbled the 
ball. Jacoby's throw beat Molitor to 
the bag by about two steps. Robin 
Yount then popped up to Tabler to 
end the inning. 

Molitor was the first batter Farrell 
ever faced in the majors, Aug. 1 8 in 
Cleveland, and Molitor singled. 

Molitor's 39-game hitting streak 
was the fifth- longest in modem 
major league history. Molitor was 
trying to tie Ty Cobb for the fourth- 
longest 



During the streak, that started July 
16 against California, Molitor was 
68-for-168, a .405 average. For the 
season, Molitor is batting .365 but 
does not have enough plate appear- 
ances to qualify among the leaders. 

Molitor's streak was the longest 
the majors since Cincinnati's Pete 
Rose hit in a National League-record 
44 consecutive games in 1978. The 
last time an American League player 
had a longer streak than Molitor's 
was in 194 1 when the New York 
Yankees* Joe DiMaggio set the 
major-league record of 56 games. 

Nine times during the streak Moli- 
tor got a hit in his first plate appear- 
ance. Three limes during the streak 
Molitor kept the streak alive with a 
hit in his final at-bal. 



Widenhofer claims 
Missouri improved 



By The Associated Press 

COLUMBIA. Mo. — Is this the 
year the sleeping giant finally stirs? 

It had better be, says a vocal seg- 
ment of Missouri alumni who are 
increasingly unhappy with their foot- 
ball program's second-class citizen- 
ship and absolutely narrow minded 
about Woody Widenhofer's 4-18 log 
as head coach. 

A favorite topic of conversation 
among Missourians this summer, 
besides the possibility of another 
Cards-Royals World Series, was 
how many games Widenhofer must 
win. 

The coach, professing confidence 
in his third Missouri team and its 
newly installed wishbone offense, 
meets the subject with candor and 
humor. 

"Which starter am 1 happiest to 
have back this year? Me," he told Big 
Eight Skywriters Wednesday. But he 
insisted he bears no ill will toward 
any of his critics. 

"I don 't think my job is in jeopardy 
right now," he said. "I really believe 
Missouri should never be worse than 
No. 3 in the Big Eight. We've got 
good facilities, we've got good loca- 
tion. Once we gel back on track, Mis- 
souri should never be worse than 
third." 

The amiable, mustachioed Wide- 
nhofer spent most of his career as a 
defensive assistant for the four-lime 
Super Bowl champion Pittsburgh 
Steelcrs. Inheriting a talent- 
impoverished squad from the previ- 
ous regime, he announced he would 
rebuild with a pro-style offense fea- 
turing a drop-back passer. 

Switching to the wishbone is a 
sign of his new-found wisdom, he 
frankly admits. 

"If you'd told me two years ago 
that I'd be involved with a wishbone 
offense, I would have told you you 're 
crazy,'* he said. 

Widenhofer is camng 'his n£w 
offense the "flexbonc," because he 
plans to occasionally split the two 
halfbacks out wide and use them as 
pass receivers. 

One major reason for going to the 
run-oriented 'bone is junior quarter- 
back Ronnie Cameron. In addition, 
the Tigers seem blessed with running 
backs, including Darrell Wallace, 
who has gained almost 1,900 yards 
the past two seasons, senior Robert 
Delpino and super freshman Tony 
VanZant. 

Sidelined his first season by a knee 
injury, VanZant, the most highly 
sought prep runner in the nation two 
years ago, is "about 90 percent," 



Widenhofer said. 

"Running back and defensive sec- 
ondary will be the strength of this 
team," he said. A transfer from SMU, 
John Stollenwerck, is challenging 
Cameron, Widenhofer said. 

Widenhofer admits these past two 
years have been a humbling learning 
experience. 

"It's a lot tougher than I thought it 
was going to be," he said. "A lot 
tougher. I just didn't know, for one 
thing, how many good players you 
need to win in college. And I didn't 
know how much speed was a factor. 
In college football, you're dealing 
with people who are still growing, 
still maturing." 

How good will the Tigers be? 

"I think we're good enough to win 
more games than we lose this year. 
The idea is progress, to make prog- 
ress," Widenhofer said. 

"Which starter am I hap- 
piest to have back this 
year? Me." 

— Woody Widenhofer 

His first Missouri team in 1985 
limped home with a 1-10 mark. Last 
year the Tigers lost several close 
ones — and also lost to Oklahoma by 
a team-record margin of 77-0 — and 
finished 3-8. 

'That's progress. You're winning 
more each year,'' he said. "I think 
we're good enough to win more 
games than we lose. Ability-wise, I 
think we're better than Kansas, Kan- 
sas State and Iowa State." 

The Sept. 12 date against Baylor 
could be more crucial than most sea- 
son openers. 

"I would never say that one ball- 
game makes a season. But we have 
some ability on this football team, in 
a lot of areas. I would say Baylor is a 
very important game for us. This 
football team needs two things. No. 
i;it> (by healthy at certain positions, 
and No. 2, win a game." 

Widenhofer promises his 1987 
Tigers will bear little resemblence to 
the 1-10 squad of 1985. 

"This team is 45 points better than 
my first team two years ago," he said. 
"It's better because of speed." While 
he may be uncertain of VanZant and 
how quickly his players will adjust to 
their new offense, Widenhofer can be 
certain of a few key operatives. 

One is Wallace, the overlooked 
fireplug who is probably much better 
than his lack of press clippings would 
indicate. The compact Kentuckian 
burst upon the Big Eight in 1985 with 
1,120 yards. 



Stan's a believer 




You can hear it everywhere and 
from everyone on the football field or 
connected to the football team in 
some manner. Stan Parrish is a bless- 
ing and a shot in the arm to K-State 
football and to the University itself. 

Sure, his first season was a dismal 
one, A 2-9 record doesn't look 
impressive, and it's hard to get sup- 
port from the fans when the record 
books show a very poor record down 
through the years. 

Remember last year when K-State 
lost 17-0 to a tough Division II team 
by the name of Northern Iowa? Let 
me refresh - or should I say bring 
back? - some bad memories. 

The whole mood of the campus 
turned sour, and a lot more Wildcats 
fans started wearing bags over their 
heads. 

Not a good sign for job security, 
huh? 

Stan Parrish is a believer, though, 
and would not give in to the losing 
tradition. 

"The loss to Northern Iowa set us 
back a year," Parrish said at the Big 
Eight Skywriters news conference 
last Thursday. 

He has, however, put last season 
behind him with a big heave-ho and 
has started out again with an attitude 
that would rival David's when he 
faced Goliath. 



This attitude of "never say die, and 
give it everything you've got" has 
woven its way into the players and 
the practice sessions. 

"We have to show the younger 
players how to be leaders, and with 
everybody wanting to be leaders we 
could have a very strong team," said 
senior fullback Rick Lewis. 

Parrish admitted he had some con- 
fidence after his initial win in KSU 
Stadium, but the next game was an 
eye-opener because the 'Cats lost 
56-10 to Oklahoma. 

"I thought we were heading in the 
right direction after getting that ini- 
tial win over Western Illinois (35-7). 
It was good for us, and it was 
important 

"Then we went into Oklahoma. 
Talk about culture shock," Parrish 
said. 

Parrish added that there are some 
must-win games this year, which 
would help the future fortunes in 
KSU Stadium. 

"This year we have to win the 
opener and win the KU and Missouri 
games," he said, and added, "It'll 
help us when it comes time to 
recruit,*' 

And Parrish has seen some prog- 
ress made, as have some of the 
players, 

"When I first came here, Coach 
(Jim) Dickey was in charge and he 
was a hard man to approach," Maur- 
ice Henry said. "He was hard to talk 
to in that it seemed the only way to 
talk to him was through his coaches. 
Parrish isn't like that at all. 

"With Parrish, he'll check on you 
every day to see how you're doing on 
and off the field and to just make sure 
everything is going fine. He really 
cares about his players, and that 
relates into a better team 
overall." 



im attitude 



■^^^■f^i 






14 



KANSAS STATS COU-SOIAN, TtWfday, Augurt 27, 1917 



Company abandons going door to door 



By The Associaled Press 

DALLAS — When the Fuller 
Brush man comes knocking, it's less 
and less likely that a housewife is at 
home. So the company (hat built its 
reputation door to door will open its 
First two stores in the Dallas area this 
fall. 

"We found that a high percentage 
of folks would buy Fuller Brush pro- 
ducts if they could get them," corpo- 
rate spokeswoman Nancy Young 



said in a telephone interview from 
Fuller Brush headquarters in 
Winston-Salem, N.C. "But the prob- 
Icm was giving them the 
opportunity." 

The company, a division of Sara 
Lee Corp., undertook market 
research in 1985 to develop new 
sales strategies. 

That led the company to test a 
catalog, and its success led to a reg- 
ional mailing into 16 Southeastern 
states in 1986, Young said. Fuller 



Brush plans to mail l.S million cata 
logs four limes a year nationwide, 
she said. 

In September the company plans 
to open a 2,600- square-foot store in a 
shopping mall in suburban Mcsquitc, 
followed by one in a northwest Dal- 
las shopping center in October. 

"The important thing to remember 
is thai it's a test," Young said. "We'll 
look at what product mix works and 
how receptive the market is." 

The Rrowing number of working 



women is reflected in the declining 
number of Fuller Brush men. 
Women now make up four-fifths of 
the company's door-to-door sales 
force. Young said. 

The company was founded in 
1906 by Alfred C. Fuller in his sis- 
ter's basement in Boston. He offered 
free replacements for brushes that 
wore out 

That guarantee still stands, Young 
said, and the Fuller Brush direct sales 
force will continue as the chief distri- 



bution network. 

"Direct selling is the backbone of 
die company," she said "Whatever 
we have has to mesh with the rest of 
the company." 

Bobbie Foster of Mesquite, who 
has sold Fuller products for 18 
months, believes the new store will 
generate business for sales 
representatives. 

"It will put the Fuller Brush name 
out before a lot of people," Foster 
said. "They haven't known we're 



still around." 

She said a division manager will 
distribute store customers' cards to 
sales representatives who can follow 
up with at-home orders. 

The company makes its brushes in 
Great Bend, Kan., along with more 
than 2,000 other items, including cot- 
ton mops and dusters, household and 
industrial brooms and cleaners, 
personal-care products, gardening 
products, stainless steel sponges, and 
even 2 mill ion plastic eggs a week . 



•The folks back home- 



want to keep up with what's 

happening in your life 
at Kansas State University. 

A subscription to the Kansas State Collegian will keep them 
up-to-date on campus events and other Manhattan activities. 

If you get too busy to write a letter every week, at least your family 
and friends will get news through the Kansas State Collegian , the 
nationally recognized, award-winning student newspaper. 



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4. SO 


5.10 


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4.79 


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4.09 


9.00 


S.70 


0.1 8 


1.20 


4.29 


S.2S 


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1.S0 


1.21 


4.45 


(.10 


0.10 


1.0B 


1.10 


4.00 


S.79 


o.to 


7.20 


1.35 


4 19 


0.00 


s.«o 


7. Si 


1.40 


1.0 1 


0,21 


7.20 


T.tO 


1.40 


S.2S 


0.50 


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1.29 


1.S0 


S.49 


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7.10 


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I.SS 


1.70 


9.2S 


7.78 


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10.00 


1.71 



01 A/tnoyncamanti IS 

02 Apa/lmafM lot Bam — FtmMhaO 18 

09 Apanmanli lor Rxil — Unlurmahad 17 

04 AuiomotMiaa la Sale IB 

05 AulOTOtKl* fl.nlaJS 19 
00 C*d ot Thart* SO 
07 Chik) Cm* 21 
0t COTfUttn 22 
00 fcrrploymani 23 

10 ("•njricni SafVCM 24 

11 Garafla and Yin* Sala* 23 

12 Hauut and Moo* Horns lot Rant 26 

13 HouaH and Moot* Hotna* lot Saw 27 

14 loat and Found 28 



MacaUanaou* Ma>chandi*a 
Mokxcyctaa/BeycJn to- Saw 
Muacal itiittomanii 
PatxMiait 

Pal* and Pat Suopkaa 
Protational Sarvicaa 
flan tall 

flatuma'Typnfl Sanrtca* 
floommiia Warn*) 
Sluatiofi Wantad 
StjotWQnacnttonal Equptnant 
SiClam 



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Classified Mall Order Form 

Name 



=3* 



Phone no. 



Student ID #_ 



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.13. 

.18. 

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Total days in paper — .Category 




AT COLUMBIA 
SAVINGS... 



Checking is 
Convenient and 
Easy to Use! 

At Columbia Savings, we've made checking convenient 
and easy to use. 

Our new Interest Checking Account pays you interest on 
all your money, all the time. And, you can write as many 
checks as you want, keep your balance where you 
want to keep it, and use your checking account any time 
you want to use it. What could be more convenient. 

You can make deposits or withdrawals at any of 
Columbia Savings' offices and at any VIA 24-hour location 
in Kansas or across the nation. 

Call us or visit any of our offices and ask about Interest 
Checking. At Columbia Savings, we've improved 
checking by making it simple. 



Columbia Savings 



FfDFRAL ASS.^CiAli 
630 Humboldt / Manhattan, Kansas 66502 



D M 



CLAV CENTER / COLBY/ COTTON WOOD FALLS/ EMPORIA / GREENSBURG 
IARNED / LAWRENCE / MANHATTAN / OBERLIN / PRATT / WAMEGO 



FSLIt 



? 



wmm 



*-- - 



v*-. 



■ iiw 



*— 



-«- 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Thursday, August 27, 1 S 87 



IS 



Kedzie 103 



ClassAds 



532-6555 



Claaailieai art payable in advance unlet* cli 
eni hu an eatablisned account wtih Student Pubii 
cation* 

Deadline la noon the day baton) publication 
noon FRIDAY FOfl Monday's paper 

SiuOant Publication! will not oa reiponalbt* 
tor mora man ona wrong c lassitied mtan ion It la ilia 
advartlaar i raaponaibiliiy to contact tha paper It an 
error emu* No adjudment wit) ba mad* It tha error 
doe* not altar tha value ol tha ad 

llama found ON CAMPUS can ba advertised 
FREE tor a panod not exceeding three days They 
can ba ptacad at Kedzit 103 or by calling 532-8555 



FREE 

Hors d'oeuvres 
10 p.m.-Midnight 
Monday-Thursday 



FARMER'S MARKET Fifth and Humboldt. Saturday S 
am to I p m Vagatablaa, trull. flowers |4 5i 

SILK WEDDING and Moral arrangements Made to or 
dar bouquets, corsages, ate Five years axperi 
ence 339-3647 H 9) 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



01 



MARY KAY Coematict— Stun car*- glamour prod- 
uct* Free facial, call F torts Taylor, 5392070 Hand 
icappad accessible IV 75) 

FLYING INTEREST you 1 ' For Information on «-State 
Flying Club cati Hugh irvm. 532-8311 or 53*3128 
(1tf> 

WANTED— too overweight people to try new choco 
lata, vanilla, and strawberry n*rb*l weight control 
program No drugs, no eiarclee. Doctor approved 
100% guaranteed MasterCard and Visa accepted 
Call 778-5)14 or 778 1*85 [t 30) 

t 10-1380 WEEKLYfllp Mailing Circular) 1 No 
duotasfboiMS fntormalton Rush sail addressed 
envelop* CM/NA-CDE. POLB 7730, Rocktord. IL 
81 tM 11-15) 

HOLLYWOOD'S BEST Gal your Cinemegic Video 
coupon books from Joy. 776 5494 before 9 m 1 1 ■ 
S) 

THE FONE Crisis Center will ba holding volunteer 
training Aug 79 and 30 in Union 213 Alt interested 
persons are encouraged to call 532-6565 to regis 
ler (1-5) 

OPEN AIR food and craft lair in Aggieville. Oct 10 
For information on booths, writ* Box 1804 in Man- 
hattan fiy Sept 25 12-19) 



— Firm and Tone 

Muscles — Lose Inches 

the relaxing way. 

1st Visit Free 



#c 



University ™'Club 

17th & Anderson, 539-7531 

ASK ME about Mary Kay Cosmetics! J anal Millikan 
539 9468 it 271 

Enjoy Our Weekly 
Buffet Specials 

11 :30 a.m. -2 p.m. 
M— Texas Western BBQ 
T —Italian 
W-Oriental$>|95 

U —Mexican "^ 
F — Cajun 

includes salad bar 
or call for caxry-oui 



The KSU 

PARACHUTE 

CLUB 

will meet tonight 

ALL returning members 

must be present to 

remain current 

Union 209 
7 p.m. 



WHERE 00 you lind saashelts in Kansas' 1 at Krystai 
los Thursday Sunday 10:30 a.m. -6 p.m Highway 
24 East M9-0360 <4| 



yVC 



APARTMENTS FOR RENT-FUMISHEO 



02 




Uniwersity^'Club 

1 7th & Anderson, 539-7531 



ENTERTAINERS WANTED, musicians singers, etc . 
and audience for good country and western and 
gospel music *v*ry Friday and Saturday night 776 
5222 14-12! 

FINANCE CLUB Meeting tonight, 7 p.m , Umori-206. 
refreshments provided All maiors welcome |4) 



fiKureSatnm 

Cendkwood Plm-3232 Kimball Ave. 
776-3308 

JOIN IN the fun at Ogden s Fall Festival -Saturday, 
Aug. 29 Parade— 11 am, bed race*— 1 p.m , tug 
of -war— 1 :30p.m. , dinner— 4 p m. street dance — 7 
p m Cat) 539-4327 for information (341 



at 



Beach Party 



3-7 p.m. Thurs. 
'60s Music 60cTacos 60C Burgers 
SI. 25 Beach Drinks 

PRI0ET7E TRTOUTS Saturday Aug 29.9am inMc 
Cain 201 Questions call Jo Byrnes 532 5296 or 
leave message at 532-5150 |4| 



TWO BEDROOM basement apartment for rant Fully 
furnished $250 Renter pays water and electric 
537-3224 (1-S) 

THREE BEDROOM, utilities mostly paid. No pat), 
watarbeds 539*058 Monday, Wednesday Friday 
mornings. Of (913) 494-2833 (1-5) 

F REE RENT taat month ot yearly lease Ten or twelve 
month lease Available m August No pets 537 
8309 (2111 

MCE TWO bedroom duple*, gas, air. carpeted, free 
tar August Telephone 537 7334 (2-ii 

ONE BEDROOM, nicely furnished b*s*m*n! apart 
menl. one-halt block to campus Laundry and ca- 
ble TV, 1190 plus utilities Prater lemsle. upper 
class, non-smoker Call 539 1636 alter 5pm (35) 

APARTMENTS! ROOMMATES' fieniais 1 We hev* 
what you need* Call Tel* Find 12-fl p m 538-CALL 
(4-8) 

AMRTMENIS FPU HENT-UNFURHISHEO B3 

FREE RENT laal month of yearly lease Tan or Iwefv* 

month lease Available in August No pels 537 

8389 I2tf| 
ONE BEDROOM duple, apartment, stove, retngera 

lor. air conditioner 1230 Available October Call 

537 1878 lor appointment (4 6) 



Rubes 



* 



By Leigh Rubin 




AUTOMOBILES FOH SALE 



197B PONT I AC Firebird. Ttop. tour speed. 14.000 
miles on rebuilt engine Call 539-4 134 evenings (1 

5) 

1981 DATSUN 280ZX lurbo. limited edition. T-top. 
leather air, full power, stereo 539-9131 (2-6) 

1978 DODGE Aspen wagon Air conditioned, power 
sleeringmreAea Low mileage, runs well 1500 or 
beat offer 5394202 or 532-8842 (2«) 

1949 CHEVROLET one-ion truck, good fires Do 
pendable Include hoi St. extra parts 776-9746 early 
or tale 124)) 

)98 1 VW Rabbit dlesei, air conditioned. 5- speed, ex 
cedent condition II. 800 Call 778-1505 135) 

1989 VW Bus. WOO. mechanics and body belter than 
pries 308 N 15th 5391956 (3 7| 

1979 DATSUN 2BQZX 5 speed, air conditioned new 
paint Must sen 778 9188, evenings. (3 7) 

1976 CHEVY Bluer Good condilion-400(4 BBL. au- 
tomatic transmission-power brakes-power 
steermg-four wheel drive, loch-oul hubs Call 776- 
0786atter6pm i4 8i 



CHILD CARE 



OT 



"Ah. slop your complaining' You knew I was spineless 
when you married me. Now gel oil my back 1 



CHILD CARE— Teacher has openings in Day Car* 
home near Northview school Nutritious meals. 
activities 539-0585 licensed (15) 

LIVE IN SITTER Single parent needs after school' 
evening cere Boy 9, girt 6 Free rem. utilities 
meals Conveniences washer -dryer, microwave. 
cable, VCR Two blocks from campus Calf Pat. 
5394)437 (2-81 

BABYSITTER FOR Two toddlers, fleaible evening 
hours. I ran sport at ion necessary Kim 539 2407 1 3 
*} 

EMPLOYMENT ~oT 

GRILL COOKS needed day) or evenings Apply in 
person, Bobby Ts 3240 Kimball. across Irom Cico 
Parti it -5) 

NOW HIRING Part time evening and weekend grill 
cooks 10-20 nournwee* Apply in person 11 1 
South 4th The Chei C*fe (110) 



Bloom County 



By Berke Breathed 



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if its mwp Nev/ / 
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Garfield 



By Jim Davis 




HOW NICE..' ARE V0U ROB&lNG 

AGAIN6T /WV L£& TO TE.U ME 

MOW MUCH V0U LOVE M£? 




OR TO TELL ME, IF I PQN'T fit? 
VOLI. VOO'LL RIP OFF M«r» FACE ? 








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PROGRAMMER POSITIONS available The Kansas 
Cooperative Extension Service has openings tor 
several student computer programmers Work 
schedules can be arranged around class limes 
Applicants should be familiar with one ol iha fol- 
lowing languages Pascal, C Cobot or Assembler 
For more information, contact Mary Knapp or 
Sham Thompson. Computer Systems 01 lice. 
Room 211 umbetger Phone 532-7019 Applies 
tions are available from the above individuate or in 
the Computer Science Office Applications will be 
accepted through Sept 10 1987 (4-13) 

DATA ENTRY Operator Student As si slant -Pre 
Admissions Unit Up lo 20 hours per week through 
December Musi be available in two or more hour 
Mm* blocks Possible continued employment 
through spring semester at reduced hours Re 
quires accuracy, reliability, familiarity with com 
put*rs and office procedural Selection criteria 
will Include OPA. prior related computer ex pan 
ence and longevity Starting salary $3 35 per hour 
Applicahons available in Anderson Hall Rm 119 
Closing dele Aug 28 EOE ft -5) 

KANSAS CAREERS needs a student with excep- 
tional word processing and clerical skills to work 
afternoon) starling Sept i Obaie 3 skills prefer- 
red Submit application, letter resume and rater 
ence* by Aug 28 lo Kansas Careers, Fatrchiid Hall 
304. Kansas State University. Manhattan, Kansas 
68508 Kansas State University is an Equal Oppor 
tunily Employer (1-5) 

PART TIME WORK full time pay' ' ' Christmas Around 
The World needs area demonstrators 1 Seasonal 
Your own hours No cash invailmam. collecting, 
dr d*l ivery Pal i f 238-54 29. Ad ale 539 2930 o r Terry 
537 3948 It 10) 

HAVE FUN and make money loo, with Avon 539 
1938 41-St 

LUNCHROOM PLAYGROUND Supervisors 1112 to 2 
hours per day 11am to i p m S3 87 per hour Ap 
ply Is USD 1383 2031 Poynti. Manhattan. KS 
68502 913 537 2400 EOE 12-81 

GIRL FRIDAY. 18-20 hours/week normally. 5-8:15 
p m mandilory, other hours your schedule Own 
transportation, references Evening meal prepara- 
tion, and some child car* Call after 6:30 p.m. eve- 
ning* weekends 7765552. (2-6) 

SCHOOL BUS Drivers beginning immediately 14 75 
per hour mu si be 21 years ol age. hav* • good dnv 
ing record and complete a I raining program Bus 
driving experience not required Hours 630 lo 
8 30 am and 2 40 to 4 30 p.m Job description 
available Apply to USD 1383. 2031 Poynli Ave . 
Manhattan, Kansas 66502 913-537 2400 EOE 12 81 

UNIQUE WOMEN'S store opening October In Man 
hat I an Full -time manager needed, retail experi- 
ence preferred Submit resumes to Box 6. % Colle- 
gian (2-51 

LIBERAL MAiD'companion needed weekdays to 
keep house and care for handicapped husband 42, 
with broken leg Calf 776-6584 between i and 8 
p m (2-4) 

PLAN NOW lor next summers employment < Enroll 
in Community Education's Advanced Litesaving 
Class The class starts Monday Aug 31 The class 
meets on Monday and Wednesday until Oct 19 
The class begins at 5 30 p m and ends el 7 15 p m 
at the K S U natalorium This course is required 
for the Water Safety instructor Course For more 
information call Community Education al 532 
5570 and to register call 532 5566 I3-5I 

RESEARCH SUBJECTS Needed US citizens aged 
20-40 ire needed tor a comfort study on mat I res 
ses during September and October 160 per per 
son Sign up at Institute lor Environmental Re 
search center back ol Saaion Hall (3-5) 

NOW TAKING applications for bartenders wait 
resses. disc lockeys and door person Apply m per 
son Ask for Doug or Belly at the Dougout (3-5l 

HARDEE'S IN Aggieville is taking applications tor 
delivery drivers Must have dependable car and in 
surance Hours flexible, nights and weekend! 13- 



EDlTDRIAL ASSISTANTS— Part time student assis 
tints 10 write, edit and produce manuals and other 
user document el ion tor microcomputer software 
Solid command ot spelling grammar and clear 
•tntng skins in English essential E ruling expert' 
ence and ability fo use electronic word process 
Ing. especially WordStar desirable For appiici- 
lion form, call at the Computer Systems Oftice. 
211 UmbetgerHall (3-7) 

NANNIE TRAINING Long Island. New York, long 
term placement so you can finish school nearby — 
S2O0lweek plus roomfbosrd Send resume. Li- 
leskilis institute, 123 South Street. Oyster Bay. 
N r U771 (4-8) 

KSU STUDENT employees needed residence hall 
food center*. 13 35 per hour The residence hall 
food service centers are hiring student employees 
You may choose your hours wilhtn Ihe lime peri- 
ods siudenis ire needed Work any where from 3 lo 
20 hou rs per week — you r c hoice ' I J obs si 1 II ava 1 i s- 
ble m Food Production Service and Sanitation 
Noon hours particularly needed, no night work 
rlimsned by 7 45 p m at the latest), every other 
weekend assigned, and no holiday work expected 
Call Pal. 6483 IDerby lood center). Mary. 6464 
(Boyd lood center). Sherry 6482 (Kramer food cen- 
teri 14-8) 

WANTED PHOTOGRAPHER lor wieddlng September 
8. 1987 Musi conlacl before September 2. 1987 
Experienced only 913-485-2235 (4-8) 

NANNY WANTED tor child care and light house 
keeping after school two 10 three days a week 
HoursvsryCerrequired5325533or537-2615aiter 

6 p.m i4-6i 



GARAGE AND YARD SALES 



11 



GARAGE AND Bake Sale Saturday Aug 29 from 8 
am to 1 pm at 2005 Hayes Drive Multi -family 
with lots ol everything Sponsored by Mother's 
Club of Boy Scout Troop 76 (4 5) 

HOUSES AHB MOBILE HOMES FOR RENT ~if 

THREE BEDROOM, lurnished, will accommodate 
three students Two bathrooms. TV roam, no pets. 
no children t37S plus utilities, one veer lease or 
10 month lease 5398808 (ill) 

MULTt BEDROOM HOUSE, stove, refrigerator cen- 
tral air, fireplace, laundry hookups, garage Call 
537-8389(111) 



ADULT COURT for serious siudenis One-, two-, 
three -bed room, very reasonable quiel location 
near campus, no pets 537-8388 (31f) 

ST. FRANCIS house residence space available, short 
btock off campus 11 35! month smgte room, 
shared kitchen Can 537 0593 leave message (3-71 

THREE BEDROOM unfurnished house close 10 
campus, fenced yard girage No pel* Celt 537 
1234 Trust Depart mem Monday- Friday. 8 a m -5 
p m (4lf| 

HOUSES AMP WOIILE HOMES FOR SALE ~iT 

1975-2 bedroom 14 x 70 moblt* horn* at Walnut 
Grove Appliances, central an New deck with awn 
ing, chain link fenced yard storage shed, carpets 
< new throughout I Wallpapered redecorated 1 
month ago 494-2720 (1 51 

1984 AMERICAN Mobite Home. 14 x 80, two 
bedroom, central ainheat. located at Colonial Gar 
dens Lot 332, very clean, book value 11 3 000 make 
often 482- 33 11 or 482 3523 ft -5) 

KS PARENTS'sludents Don't waste money renting 
Buy and recover your investment at re sale or lax 
time Beautiful one-year-old three-bedroom, two 
bath mobile home Fully lurnished all appliances 
539-71 IB or 537-0104 n 5| 

MOBILE HOME 80* 12 14 500 Northv.ew Call after 
8 p.m . 539-3882 (34) 

1971 OLYMPIC mobile horn*. 12 X 65 two Bedroom 
new hot water healer new doors Only $3. 700 
Phone S3? 77 15 or 776-9496 14-61 



LOST AMD FOUND 



14 



FOUNO, MALE puppy, approximately six months 
old, short blonde hair Found in Shop Ouik parking 
lot across from Goodnow 537 1096 <2 4) 



MISCELLANEOUS MERCHANDISE 



IS 



FOR SALE— Super single waierbed plywood post 
con st rue I ion. heater 150 Call 776-7511 after 6pm 
12-5) 

DRAFT ING TABLE 31 " x 42- with parallel bar, porta 
bl*. fit* on desk too real nice 1 Rob 532-6078 Ask 
ing 135 (2 5] 



CLOTHES WITH CLASS 

SPELLbinders 



h 



•'V'lli 

'ELLbiMers « I 

iNHtHNiiri'trl iNtifint) 

in. Mill! 






M0N.-FRI. 10-5 



SANYOREFRtGEMATOR, J Scubic feet, gooo shape 
170orb*»fotlar Call 778 7537 alter 5 30 P m (3-7l 

DORM BUNKBED tor sale Has carpeted ladder Best 
otter Call 539-7465 after 4 p m 13-61 

TWO ROOM sue pieces carpel and pad. 120 each, 
you haul Complete darkroom equipment 539 
3923 13 5) 



Maidenformf 

Buy two 
Get one 
FREE 

Sale is no w on at 

WDzrtXNEfi 

1224 Moro Aggieville 
Open 7 days 

USED GOOD desk lor sale Call 776 5222 |4 121 

WHIRLPOOL WASHER and Maytag dryer Priced to 
sen Call 776-9017 evenings (4-6) 

FOUR tic K,ETS. each 'or Cardinals - Braves weekend 
series 5399412 (4 5l 




Buy a Student 

Semester or Year 

Membership 

and receive 

5 FREE 

TANNING SESSIONS 

The Candlewood Center 

3236 Kimball 
776-1750 

olfer expires Sept 1, 1967 



MUST SELL Large, dorm-em refrigerator 1120 or 
best oiler Cell Karl at 539-0289 (4-5) 

HP41CV WITH mathfslal pac and HP 18c business 
calculator Call 539 2343 after 5 30 p m . ask for 
Pal (4-5) 



M0TORCYCLES/8HYCLES FOH SALE 



16 



MIYATA RACING bike 58cm. good condition, sun 
four component 1350 Call 539-5825 (2-6) 

YAMAHA DT400 Enduro Excellent condition 1450. 
extras 494 2756 |2 6) 

1984 HONDA 250 XLR Bougni new in 1985 excellent 
condition low mileage. 1700 or best olfer |3-5| 

1981 KAWASAKI KL250 street legal Enduro Good 
condition 1425 firm Call Bill 539-9023. leave mes 
sage |35| 

CENTURION ACCORDO 25'. very good shape, on* 
year old. sntmano components. 1 190 Call Jim. 
539-0180 (48) 



MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS 



IT 



AKAI REELIO reel tape player 
0180 14 81 



125 Call Jim. 539 



PERSONALS 



IS 



THETA PLEDGES A place in our family you have 
found, out love and friendships are all around 
We re so glad you're here! Good luck with classes' 
Love, me Ac lives (4) 

THE MEN ot Acacia cordially mute all young ladies 
lor an evening of unforgettable tun and excite 
menl 8pm lomghi 2005 Homing Ave (4| 

PARTY WITH Sailors' II almost scans il almost 
rhymes' Come (0 the Sailing club pig roast and 
have a labutous time 1 Meet girls 1 Meet guys' 
Food, beer pop, and sails under Tuttle skies' Sepi 
4. be (here and'or be square, wedon'l care 1 Tickets 
on sale in the Union 16. or call 537,2987. or 539- 
5463 14 8) 

WOMEN OF KSU -The men ot Delta Upsilon would 
love lose* you tonight at Iheir Little Sislercocktail 
parly Begins al 5 p m at the DU house 141 

SO NOW you re a dan and one of the tew All the den 
darlings wish the best for you' Congrats tall 1967 
pledge class (4) 



PROFESSIONAL SERVICES 



20 



PROMPT ABORTION and contraceptive services in 
Lawrence 913841 5716 HU] 

PREGNANT'' BIRTHRIGHT can help Free preg- 
nancy lesl Conlidential Call 537 9180 103 S 
Fourth St , Suite 25 (flfl 



RENTALS 



11 



SUPPLIES PRINTER typewriter Rental typewriters 
available correcting and non-correcting Hull 
Business Machines 715 Noun 12th. Aggieville. 
539 7931 lltfl 



RESUME/TYPING SERYICE 



22 



PAPERS. RESUMES cover letters, theses and dls 
sen at ions entered slored and completed 10 your 
spec 1 he at ions Let ler Qualify printer Come see 
us Ross Secretarial Services. 614 N 12th (across 
Irom Knee) 539-5147 (1 5) 

ARE YOU prepared for interviews^ Call Resume Ser- 
vice tor your resume, data sheet or cover letter 
needs 1Z11 Moro, 537 7294 1 3-5) 

EXPERIENCED TYPIST computer, disc slorage. 
letler-oualily printer Ask for Donnda 537 9205 (*■ 
10) 



ROOMMATE WANTED 



23 



ROOM AND board for male, will do laundry Can 494 
8249 |1 N 

ROOMMATE(S) NEEDED lo share live-bedroom 
house 1100 10 1150 a month plus utilities Rust. 
Stem. 452 5814 leave message |2-5| 

WANTED ROOMMATE fo share two bedroom apart 
ment. 1185 per month plus one-half Pills Call 776 
0124 1 25| 

FEMALE NONSMOKING cheap ram. transport* 
lion helpful Call evenings 5392205 or 776 560B 
ask lor Dawn (3 7] 

ROOMMATE WANTED Own room washer and dryer, 
close lo campus. 1135 Call 776-7905 (3-&I 

OPENING FOR two people 41 1230 Vatlier. directly 
across street Irom campus 1135lmonlh Inquire al 
location i3-7i 

ONE OR two nonsmoking female to share farm- 
house Prefer *ei or animal science majors Free 
stall and pasture tor horse, cow dog Beef, eggs, 
firewood, ski boat furnished 776 1205. 8- 10 pm 
only (3 7| 

NON SMOKING FEMALE 10 share luxury horn* on 
Waal side 1195 ptus utilities 537-0560 Ask lor 
Diane 776-5602 after 5pm (3-5 1 



SITUATION WANTED 



24 



FREE ROOM and board in exchange for daytime be 
bysitling Female, non smoker preferred Call 776 
3136 (3 ill 

PAY DAY' Apply now tor sludent positions (all shifts 
all hours) including ice cream. Mexican, pizza 
cook baker waiiei. waitress and more' Bring in 
your fall class schedule today and fill oul applies 
lion m K Stale union food service office We olfer 
student pay plan. 10b variety, and centrally located 
work place where you work with other students 
We require that you must be honest, reliable and 
display a sense of urgency, must be clean, neat 
and wear appropriate aitrre We preler to hire work 
study siudenis and siudenis who are eligible lo 
work 30 hours per week Food Handler s card a 
muSI (3-10) 

WANTED BASS player for local rockidance band 
Good vocal range also preferred Can Michael or 
Dave in 537 1770 13-7) 

MUSICIANS WANTED lo lorm country band Lead, 
bass, piano, drums Must be serious and proles 
sional Call Garth al 776-6246 (4 61 



SPORTING/RECREATIONAL EQUIPMENT 



25 



YO U CA N nave you r ow n boat by t h 1 s weatten d lor bu y 
shares with friends) 15 foot baia ski boat. 105 
horsepower Chrysler outboard fully equipped, 
ready Id go. 776-8938 (3 5) 

OUTOF-shape female grad sludent looking for 
someone in like condition lo exercise with Let s 
motivate each other' Call 776 1837 p4 ( 

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Crossword 



By Eugene Sheffer 



Peanuts 



By Charles Srhulz 




(j}ackmAhp]7 




ACROSS 
1 Consumer- 

iNt Ralph 
9 Raises 

trivial 

objections 

12 Canal site 

13 Biblical 
peak 

1 4 Become 
communi- 
cative 

15 Wee 

16 [fun's (togs 

17 "You said 
it!" 

19 Stitch 

20 Behold, 
to Brutus 

22 Bat wood 
24 Network 
27 h'nils a 

hand 
29 Movie 

1 11 "II tv 

32 Columhu.s's 

milieu 
35 I'tiri'sjMin 

stve 
3ft Meter's 

kin 

37 Museum 
DM 

38 liitmii 
date 

40 Golfbaft 

items 
42 Vessel on 

111 Across 



44 Concept 
46 Eye 

colorer 
50 Ancient 

Jewish 

fortress 

site 
52 Dennis, 

for one 

54 Extinct 
primates 

55 News hour 

56 Washday 
problems 

67 Stands 
DOWN 
1 Calif 
wine 
valley 



2 Freshly 
8"- 
Matabre" 

4 Down 
Under 
bird 

5 Excessive 
hunfter 

6 Superhero 
prop 

7 Sports 
hall 

8 Tub 

9 Isle of Man 
setting 

10 Tardy 

1 1 Klittln at- 
tendant, 
for short 



Solution time: 23 mi ns. 




531 



Yesterday'* answer 



12 Balloon 
sound 

18 Ait the go- 
between 

21 Give the 

23 Cul-de- — 

24 Bankroll 

25 Seine 
season 

26 Bosporus 
connec- 
tion 

28 Sensa 
initial 
headline 

30 Old salt 

31 Hill 
dweller 

33 Puss 

34 Keats 
product 

39 Spread 
out 

41 Trig 
functions 

42 Latin Mil 
verb 

43 Enthralled 

46 Kalhr-r 
and Marino 

47 Pan's 
opposite 

48 Desserts 
49D.CV1P 
61 Francois's 

friend 
S3 Inventor 
Whitney 




CRYPTOQUIP 



531 



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zvmqu o s R P son 



EJKML 



R V O H Y V N 



D K S L E O S Y R I K I. N 



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Yesterday's Cryptoqutp: TIRED CUB 1ST HAUNTED 
WRONG HOUSE IT WAS A BOO BOO 

Today's t'ryptoquip clue V equals R 



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KANSAS «TATK COUJJOIAN, Thursday, AM«u*t 27, 1M7 



Wheat production 
could outnumber 
preceding years 



By The Collegian Stoff 

The number of hard red winter 
wheat bushels produced in Kan- 
sas this summer is expected to lop 
figures from previous years. 

"We don't have the exact fig- 
ures yet, but it should be close to 
370 million bushels," said Becky 
Koch, communications director 
for ihe Kansas Wheat Commis- 
sion. Approximately 336.6 mil- 
lion bushels were produced in 
1986. 

Figures listed by the Kansas 
Agricultural Statistics office for 
Riley County in 1986 showed 
production of 672,900 bushels. 

"There were 24,800 acres 
harvested, so that's 27.1 bushels 



per acre. That's not real good," 
said Koch. 

The mild winter weather and 
wet spring and fall probably con- 
tributed to the low figure, said 
Koch. Figures for 1987 will be 
released in Ihe next month. 

For the second year in a row, 
Japan was the leading buyer of 
U.S. wheat, purchasing 122 mil- 
lion bushels. 

Approximately one -third of 
that amount was hard red winter. 
The remaining was a mixture of 
other varieties, the wheat com- 
mission released. 

Egypt was the second-leading 
buyer, purchasing more than 93 
million bushels. 



Policy 

■ CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 

David DcPue, executive director 
of the Kansas Council on Vocational 
Education, said any change in Kan- 
sas* admissions policy would discri- 
minate against older students, mili- 
tary veterans and vocational- 
education students. 

DcPuc said he is concerned about 
the 42 percent of high school stu- 
dents who are in general curriculum* 
and the 19 percent who are in voca- 
tional education curriculums and the 
effect of a closed admission policy 
on them. 

He said he would "challenge the 
universities to make excellent stu- 



dents out of mediocre students." 

"We need to focus on excellence, 
and if necessary initiate entrance 
requirements for specific programs 
lo hold down admissions." 

Mark Tallman, director of legisla- 
tive affairs for Associated Students 
of Kansas, said Kansas must deter- 
mine whether changing the admis- 
sions policy would truly save money, 
whether it has a higher college drop- 
out rate than slates with closed 
admission policies, and what effect a 
closed policy would have on histori- 
cally under- prepared students. 

"Before changing the admissions 
policy, we must be sure that disad- 
vantages of ihe policy outweigh 
these benefits, or lhat another system 
can result in even greater benefits," 
Tallman said. 



Lottery 

■ CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 

'The lottery is a self-funding 
agency," Zogleman said. "We have a 
product thai we can sell and make 
enough profit to be self-supporting." 

The loan is to be paid back to the 



State after the sale of tickets and the 
lottery game actually begins. 

The logo for the lottery was recen- 
tly unveiled. It was designed by a 
Wichita advertising firm. The design 
shows a large letter L in white on a 
gold and blue background, with the 
blue portion of the background simu- 
lating scratch marks across an instant 
winner lottery ticket. 




Contra 

■ CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 

CIA agents in Portugal that the air- 
craft contained Hawk missiles which 
were part of an arms-for-hostages 
swap with Iran. 

The agents told the committees 
Ihcy immediately sent an "eyes only" 
cable to Duanc "Dewey" Clarridgc, 
then head of covert operations for the 
CIA's European division, relaying 
Secord's revelation. 

According to the documents, four 
witnesses arc available to testify the 
cable was in Tact sent — the two 
agents, a Slate Department official in 
Lisbon and the CIA employee hand- 
ling the cable. 

The committees say that two 
cables are missing: the one telling 
Clarridgc about the missile shipment 
and a cable from Clarridgc idling ihe 
CIA office in Europe why it was lo 
try to obtain landing rights for the 
Israeli plane. 

The cables arc among 78 messages 
supposed to have been sent lo Clar- 
ridge al agency headquarters in Lan- 
glcy. Va., from the CIA station. 



through a special "privacy channel." 
In his testimony, George said (here 
was no way he could have missed a 
cable quoting Sccord as saying, "we 
arc trading missiles for hostages." 
"I promise you, no matter how 
many cables we send in and out over 
a month, that one would have 
grabbed mc," he said. 



Pact 



■ CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 
properly. 

Constructing die facility could 
take as long as 10 years, Muir said. 
Potentially the plans include recrea- 
tional and housing areas as well as 
industrial. 

Park benefits could include gov- 
ernment contracting, he said. Also, 
the opportunity would be available 
for many professors to become 
involved in private enterprise. 

"Itcnhanccs both sides if you have 
successful industries associated with 
successful professors," Muir said. 



Looking for an apartment? 
Check Collegian Classifieds 




WORSHIP 

ON 
CAMPUS 



DANFORTH CHAPEL 
SUNDAYS 11 A.M. 

CommunionXommunity of Students* 
International Students*lnterdenominational 

EVERYONE WELCOME 

This service is an All-University interdenominational worship to 
provide a caring, responding Christian community on campus. 
We would especially invite international and minority students to 
share in this community so as to deepen interracial, intercultural 
and global understanding. 

Coordinator: Don Fallon, Campus Pastor 
Holton Hall 102, 532-6432 



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'Be Stupid' 



Auditions were held for K- 
State Players productions 
Monday, Tuesday and Wed- 
nesday in Nichols Theatre. 
See Page 8. 



Weather 



Morning fog and low clouds Friday 
becoming mostly sunny and milder 
by afternoon, high in upper 70s. 
Mostly clear Friday night, low 
around 60. 




...* - " 



bbtl* 




&fe6i2 -ockfield 

. ,J,ufni$es to be a bright 
spot for the Wildcat football 
team. See Page 13. 



Friday 

August 28, 1987 



Kansas State University 

Manhattan, Kansas 66506 

Volume 94. Number 5 



Kansas State 



Collegian 



Hayden appeals to people for support 



Highway to benefit all, he says 



By Alison Neely 
Staff Writer 



JUNCTION CITY — Gov. Mike 
Hayden promoted his highway con- 
struction plans at a Chamber of Com- 
merce meeting here Thursday. It was 
his thirty-third town meeting on a 
whistle-stop tour through Kansas. 

The highway plans are the result of 
a seven-month study by an I K-rne ru- 
ber task force appointed by the gov- 
ernor. The areas examined were the 
entire highway system in Kansas as it 
now exists, and the current and future 
needs of Kansans. 

Funding for the highway proposal 
would be taken directly from user- 
related fees with the exception of 
bonds, which will be sold as needed 
and will constitute 20 percent of the 
total funds. 

"As a Kansan, all of us, no matter 
whether we're from cast or west, 
whether we're from a small town or 
big city, we alt have the same vested 
interest,'' Hayden said. "Through 
Kansas' history, users have paid 
most of the cost of our roads." 

The proposed plan calli Gar a 
three-fold approach to the problems: 
maintenance of the roads and 
bridges, new road construction and 
aid to the cities and counties. 

According to Hayden, the current 
highway system is inadequately 
funded and, if allowed to continue, 
will become bankrupt within 22 
months. 



'The current system ol mainte- 
nance is such that it allows us to 
repaint the steel girders on bridges 
every 96 years," he said. 

The rate of bridge replacement in 
Kansas is three to four per year. 
Because of the poor condition many 
state bridges are in, it is necessary to 
replace 30 to 40 per year, he said. The 
funding for this work is not available. 

Recommended funding for Hay- 
den's proposal is a 5 cent per gallon 
raise for motor fuel, According to the 
task force report, this increase would 
provide maintenance for the roads 
and bridges. 

The current motor fuel tax is II 
cents per gallon. Within 20 years, the 
tax could rise from 16 to 36 cents per 
gallon, he said. A cap on the price has 
been considered. 

"I ' m not opposed to that as long as 
a cap would still allow us to build the 
roads," he said. 

Hayden said the roads in certain 
parts of the state are either "totally 
worn out and unsafe" or have never 
been adequate to begin with. 

One of the construction projects 
would upgrade-* fei^g. from 1-70 
north to the K^18 river Bridge at 
Manhattan. The 9-milc route will 
become a "Super Two highway" at 
an estimated cost of $9.2 million. 
The specifications include driving 
lanes that arc 12 feet wide and paved 
shoulders that arc 10 feet wide. 

Hayden said the proposed roads in 
Kansas would also be paid for by the 



'Bleak' impression 
puts KSU Stadium 
at bottom of heap 



By Deron Johnson 

Editor 

Bleak? 

Bland? 

Them are fightin' words, 
pardner. 

But so goes the impression of 
one John McGrath, sports aficion- 
ado and Denver Post sports col- 
umnist, about KSU Stadium. In 
the Aug. 23 Post, McGrath rated 
the 20 best and 10 worst profes- 
sional and college football sta- 
diums in the nation. 

TGIFriday 

And guess what? That's ngM: 
KSU takes the honors for No. 1 
worst stadium. 

"So bland it makes the sur- 
rounding landscape look positive- 
ly breathtaking," he eloquently 
wrote. C'mon John — surely 
we're not that bad, are we? 

In a telephone interview, 
McGrath tempered his stinging 
jabs by saying that the stadiums 
were listed in no particular order. 

However, "If I had anyone in 
mind 1 was thinking of that would 
be No. 1, it would probably be 
KSU," he said. 

Fine. 

And just what is it that makes 
our fair stadium so unappealing to 
McGrath, who has visited us "a 
couple of times?" 

"As I remember, it was this 
bleak setting with Astroturf," he 
said, adding that grass would 
improve the setting. 

Despite his distaste for KSU 
Stadium, McGrath did say that 
Abeam Field House is "great" for 
basketball. 

But lest Wildcat fans feel 



singled out, they can take heart 
that McGrath also placed Arrow- 
head Stadium in Kansas City, 
Mo., among the top 10. 

Of Arrowhead he wrote: "Stay- 
ing awake and watching the 
Chiefs are inherently conflicting 
activities — especially in an ele- 
phantine 78,000-seat stadium that 
wouldn't be filled for the reincar- 
nation of Elvis." 

"This guy needs to take 
another look." 
—tee Moon 

Testy, testy. 

Actual!} , he said Arrowhead is 
"OK." However, he added, 'To 
tell you the truth, it's always been 
a real chore to slay awake in the 
Chiefs press box." He called the 
press box antisepuc and said it 
was too quiet. 

And how much reaction has he 
gotten to the rankings? Not much, 
he said. 

"1 heard on the radio the other 
day that somebody was really 
mad I rated Texas ahead of North 
Carolina," said McGrath, a 
10- year veteran of sports writing 
who has "been to a lot of 
stadiums." 

Lee Moon, assistant athletic 
director, takes McGrath *s words 
with a grain of salt. 

"I think there's a lot of other 
stadiums worse than ours," he 
said. "I think when you look at a 
stadium, you look at more than 
aesthetic ability." 

After perusing the Post article. 
Moon declared, "This is a riot. 

"This guy needs to take another 
look. Beauty is in the eye of the 
beholder arid 1 think wc have a 
real fine facility." 



motor fuel tax, but in another way. 
Motor fuel taxes would be indexed 
using the Consumer Price Index and 
would have the same elasticity as the 
sales tax. 

"Kansans would still be paying the 
same percentage of their income for 
fuel in 20 years as they are now, but 
the money would be building new 
roads," Hayden said. 

Cities and counties arc having the 
same problems maintaining roads 
and bridges as the state, Hayden said. 
The state provides upkeep for 10,000 
miles of road. Cities and counties arc 
responsible for 100,000 mUcs. 

Slate aid is one source of income 
for the city and county road mainte- 
nance, and an increased property tax 
rate is the other alternative. The task 
force is recommending a 1.5 cents - 
per-gallon increase in the motor fuel 
tax to be distributed among the cities 
and counties, Hayden said. 

As an alternative to the additional 
motor fuel tax hike and an increased 
property tax, Hayden has proposed 
increasing registration fees for auto- 
mobiles and trucks. All fee charges 
amdeiermuied directly proportional 
to the axIe"TPefghT Of' UfiTtthiclc. 

According to statistics, it has been 
proven that "wear and tea r on roads is 
directly proportional to axle weight," 
Hayden said. 

The registration fees for automo- 
biles, now at $18.38 for the 1988 
calendar year, would increase to 
■ See HAYDEN, Page 1 1 




Stiff /Steve Wolgut 

Gov, Mike Hayden explains his highway reconstruction plan to the Junction City Chamber of Commerce. 
The plan asks for over $1,6 billion to construct and modify more than 1,300 miles of Kansas highways. 



Dispute continues over product 



KCI to remain 
main supplier 
for University 



By Debbie Whitson 

Staff Writer 

Floor-cleaning products manufac- 
tured by the Kansas Correctional 
Industries are still unsatisfactory to 
some K-State employees despite 
applications! advice from an inde- 
pendent adviser. 

Alvin Seely, chief of custodial ser- 
vices I and facilities custodial ser- 
vices, said that ever since a law, 
known as the "prison-made goods act 
of Kansas," went into effect, the 
cleaning products state agencies arc 
required to purchase have been "less 
than satisfactory," 

Kansas Laws 75-5273 to 75-5282 
require state agencies to purchase 
KCI products unless specifically 
granted an exemption by the director 
of state purchases or the secretary of 
administration. 

"Quality control is a major con- 



cern with all the KCI products," See- 
ly said. "But our biggest problem has 
been with the floor care products." 

Last spring, suite institutions dis- 
satisfied with the products, including 
the University of Kansas Medical 
Center, wrote letters of complaint to 
Nick Roach, director of state 
purchases. 

Roach met with the agencies on 
May 22 and agreed to hire an inde- 
pendent floor-care consultant to 
inspect floors where the products had 
been used. 

Depending on the assessment of 
the consultant, each agency would 
possibly have been granted an 
exemption from purchasing the floor 
care products. 

Some University officials thought 
the KCI products cost as much or 
more than some commercial clean- 
ing products. 

However, KCI Director Leonard 
Ewell said that while some of the 
products may cost as much as similar 
commercial products, no KCI pro- 
ducts cost more than those from pri- 
vate industry. 

"It costs more for us to pay for the 
labor to have the floors cleaned than 
if we had a working product that 
would give us the same or better 



results in less lime," Seely said. 

Larry Patch, the consultant hired, 
has been to K -State twice to look at 
the floors, Ewell said. 

Seely said Patch looked around at 
the floors and said they looked 
"pretty good" to him. He said the 
floors Patch thought looked good had 
been cleaned by products they had 
left over from the period before they 
began using the KCI products. 

In early June, the KU Medical 
Center was granted exemption from 
using the KCI wax stripper. The 
exemption was granted after three 
requests from operation officials at 
the center. 

Seely said the wax put on the 
floors looks good for a few days, but 
then "disappears," which makes their 
floor care "labor intensive and not 
cost effective." 

Roach has said the products seem 
to work well for other agencies and 
the reason the products don't work 
for some is because they aren't used 
properly. 

Officials with Emporia State Uni- 
versity. Wichita State University and 
the Capitol in Topeka have made no 
complaints about the products. 

Seely said it is hard for inmates, 
who are trained by non- 



professionals, to compete with pro- 
fessional companies. 

"I would have no problem with 
using their products if we could get 
the kind of quality we need from 
them," he said. "But I don't want to 
continue to waste the taxpayers* 
money if we're not getting our 
money's worth. It adds up to several 
hundred dollars a year in the long 
run." 

Seely said another problem is the 
instructions on the products* labels. 
The University employees tried 
using the products as they were 
labeled and got poor results, but after 
some experimentation the employees 
were able to get better results, he 
said. 

Ewell said Patch worked with the 
employees in application of the pro- 
duct and confirmed that part of the 
problem was in the application 
instructions on the containers. 

"We are considering changing the 
labels on the wax containers," Ewell 
said. "Apparently, the labels were 
instructing the user to put on a coat of 
wax that was loo thin." 

Ewell said there is no specific date 

in the works for when they will be 

changing the labels, but the consul- 

■ See KCI. Page 1 1 



Troops attack Philippine palace 



By The Associated Press 

MANILA, Philippines — Mutin- 
ous troops attacked the presidential 
palace compound and state broadcast 
centers Friday in an attempt to over- 
throw the 1 H- month -old government 
of President Corazon Aquino. She 
was safe and appealed for calm, but 
the rebels continued fighting 
throughout the day. 

Col. Honcsto Istcta, an armed far- 
ces spokesman, said the revolt was 
led by Col. Gregorio Honasan, for- 
mer aide to Sen. Juan Ponce Enrile, 
whom Aquino fired as defense 
minister after another coup at tempi 
in November. 



Rebels seized the government 
television center, parts of the army 
and air force headquarters and a con- 
stabulary garrison north of the city. 
Troops loyal to Aquino surrounded 
[he presidential palace and her near- 
by residence. 

At least nine people were killed 
and 94 wounded in the uprising 
which began before dawn when 
truck loads of soldiers began an 
assault near the palace and govern- 
ment broadcast center in suburban 
Quezon City. 

Aquino, facing the gravest crisis 
of her administration, said in a radio 
interview the situation would soon be 
under control. A military officer. 



demanding anonymity, described it 
as "highly unstable." 

In a statement broadcast over a pri- 
vate television station, the rebels 
claimed they would control the 
nation by the end of the day. 

Fighting continued in densely 
populated areas of the capital nearly 
12 hours after it began, with midday 
attacks on Camp Aguinaldo, the 
headquarters of the armed forces and 
Defense Ministry and Villamor Air 
Base, the air force headquarters near 
Manila's airport. 

Honasan told reporters before he 
and some of his men managed to 
enter Armed Forces headquarters 
that the operation was aimed it 



"unification of the people, the con- 
cept of justice and true freedom" and 
claimed it was "not a military coup." 

"All we are fighting for is the 
children, our children and the child- 
ren of the Filipino people," Honasan 
said. 

Gen. Fidel Ramos, the chief of 
staff, said about 300 men attacked at 
1 a.m. and there were "propaganda" 
reports that the mutineers supported 
him and Enrile. Ramos, who has put 
down other coup attempts, said he 
remains loyal to Aquino. 

The telephones of Enrile and his 
spokesman Sylvestrc Afable were 
not ringing. 

■ See TROOP, Page 1 1 



WW* 



KANSAS STATE COLLtGI AN, Friday, Augu.t 2«, 1M7 



Briefly 



By The Associated Press 



Single-engine plane crashes 

KANORADO, Kan, — An airplane crash was spotted by the Col- 
orado Civil Air Patrol Thursday evening during a search for a 
single-engine airplane that was reported missing in eastern Color- 
ado, CAP Capt. Dieter Hantschel said. 

Hantschel said the wreckage was found about four miles south of 
Kanorado, Kan., and he added there was no sign of life, 

Dean Strothetde, air traffic manager at the Scottsbluff, Neb., 
Right Service Center, said the plane was piloted by Ned Lynch of 
North Platte, who was believed to be flying alone. 

Strotheide said the plane left Scottsbluff at 9:15 Tuesday night. 
The plane left the Burlington, Colo., airport at 2:45 a.m. Wednesday 
and told officials he was heading to McCook, Neb. But the plane 
was seen heading southeast after departure, although McCook is 
northeast of Burlington. 

The Sherman County, Kan., sheriff's office said the plane was 
discovered about 6 p.m. in a cornfield. 

The start of the search was delayed from daybreak until after 
noon Thursday by constantly changing cloud patterns, but six air- 
craft eventually were launched, Hantschel said. 

The Kansas Civil Air Patrol launched two aircraft to search on its 
side of the border, he added. 

Court rules on abortion issue 

ST. PAUL, Minn. — A federal appeals court ruled Thursday that 
states may not require minors to notify both parents before having 
an abortion, even if the laws allow girls to turn to the courts instead. 

"Where...the underlying notification requirement impermissibly 
burdens the minor's abortion decision, that requirement cannot be 
saved by the presence in the statute of an alternative court bypass 
procedure," said a three-judge panel of the 8th U.S. Circuit Court of 
Appeals. 

The opinion affirmed a November 1986 order by U.S. District 
Judge Donald Alsop permanently barring Minnesota from enforcing 
a 1981 abortion notification statute. That was believed to be the first 
court ruling on the constitutionality of a court-alternative law 
already in force. 

Chief Deputy Attorney General Jack Tunheim said the stale 
would decide in about a week whether to appeal. 

The 1981 law required those providing abortions to minors to 
notify both of the girl's parents, when possible, at least 48 hours in 
advance. 

A girl could avoid the parental notification requirement by 
demonstrating to a court either that she was mature or that notifying 
her parents would not be in her best interest. 

The Appeals Court cited findings by Alsop that approximately 50 
percent of all marriages in Minnesota end in divorce and approxi- 
mately 42 percent of all minors in the state do not live with both 
biological parents. 

'Fiscal watchdog' to retire 

MADISON, Wis. — Sen. William Proxmire, who built a national 
reputation as a fiscal watchdog during three decades in the U.S. 
Senate, announced Thursday he will not seek a sixth term in 1988. 

"I'd be almost 80 years old when I retired in 1994, or whenever it 
is," said the 71 -year-old Democrat "That's too old." 

The announcement came 30 years to the day after he first won his 
Senate seat. It stunned many politicians and triggered speculation of 
wide-open Democratic and Republican primaries for the scat held 
by "Prox" — a landslide victor in recent elections. 

Proxmire, whose monthly "Golden Fleece Awards" Spotlighted 
government waste, said he never realised his major gost of bringing 
"sanity to our fiscal spending." 



Penn — popular jail attraction 

LOS ANGELES — Sean Penn penned apparently is just loo much 
temptation. 

"Everybody sneaks a peek at him through the little window on his 
door," an unidentified source was quoted as saying in Wednesday's 
Los Angeles Herald Examiner. "Nurses, doctors, trusties, sometimes 
five people at a time." 

Penn, 27, checked into the Los Angeles County Jail on Aug. 22 to 
serve the second portion of a 60-day sentence for probation 
violations. 

A judge ordered the actor jailed after a fight with a man who tried 
to photograph him on the set of the film "Colors." Penn was placed 
on probation earlier this year after a brawl with a man he thought was 
trying to kiss his pop singer wife, Madonna. 

Penn was assigned to a section of jail reserved for inmates thought 
to be at risk from the jail population. 

Perm's cell in the "elite section," as inmates call it, is freshly 
painted in light blue with dark blue trim, has metal doors and is furn- 
ished with a steel frame bed bolted to the door, a two-inch foam 
mattress and a small porcelain sink and toilet, the paper said. 

'Julius Caesar* made modern 

PHILADELPHIA — "Julius Caesar" will be brought into the 
20th century in January, when Richard Harris takes on a modem 
production at the University of Scranton. 

"If the production is very successful, I would recast it and take 
that production to Broadway," Harris said Wednesday from London. 

It will begin with the crucifixion of Jesus Christ and deal with the 
assassinations of Presidents Lincoln and Kennedy, civil rights leader 
Martin Luther King Jr., and Egyptian President Anwar Sadat, he 
said. 

Harris, who will play Marc Antony, said he chose the 
4,600-student Jesuit university as part of a memorial to his late 
brother, Dermot. 

The 53-year-old Irish-bom actor said he will teach acting starting 
in January to prepare the student cast for the adaptation of the 
Shakespearean tragedy. 

Singers pay for cancelation 

JOPLIN, Mo. — A federal jury has ordered country music singers 
Waylon Jennings and Jcssi Colter to pay more than $34,000 to 
promoters of a concert that was canceled in 1985. 

Officials of Elk River Association Inc. and SgL Peppers Inc. con- 
tended they didn't agree to the cancellation but were told by the 
singers' road manager, David Trask, that a flight delay would pre- 
vent the singers, who are married, from arriving in time for the con- 
cert in Noel. 

Jennings testified Tuesday that he intended to perform, and said 
he lost 510,000 because of the cancellation. The trial ended 
Wednesday. 



Norwegian King to visit Iowa 

DECORAH, Iowa — King Olav V of Norway will visit in 
November at the invitation of Vestcrhcim, the Norwegian- American 
Museum. 

The 84-year-old Norwegian monarch, who is honorary chairman 
of the museum, visited Dccorah in 1975 for Vesterhcim's rededica- 
tion ceremony. Vestcrhcim means "home in the west," and is con- 
sidered one of the United States* finest collections of Norwegian- 
American immigrant artifacts and history. 



Campus Bulletin 



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ANNOUNCEMENTS 

CAREER PLANNING & PLACE- 
MENT will conduct placement one mat ion 
meeting! today for seniors in Apparel & Tex- 
tile Marketing at 9:30 a.m. in Justin 236; Engi- 
neering at 3:30 p.m, in Forum Hall; and Eco- 
nomics at 3:30 p.m. in Hull/ Hall. 

TODAY 

SHE DU'S meet at the DL House at 3 p.m. 

NATIONAL SOCIETY OF PROFES- 
SIONAL ENGINEERS mceu at 5 pm. at 

3500 Minimi's Landing. 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL has ache 
Ju led the final oral defense of the doctoral dis- 
sertation of Patricia J. Zbikowiki it 1 :30 p.m. 
in Josltn 247. The dissertation topic is "Mea- 
surement and Prediction of the Thermal Insu- 
lation Values of Bedding Systems." 

SATURDAY 

BLACK STUDENT UNION meeis at 10 

pm in the Union Caukeller. 

SUNDAY 

P.E.O. STUDENT CHAPTER mecu al 
2:15 pm. in front of Call Hall. 




T 


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BUFFET, 

JOIN MANHATTAN'S 

TGIF TRADITION! 

Nil mtmbenhip nttded 
For restaurant & bar! 
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FRIDAY 

Fried Chicken. 
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All you can eat *3™ 

SATURDAY 

Steak Night 

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A health care 

product 

that's right 

for today! 

Its called SHARED PAY 
COMPREHENSIVE and it's 
designed to provide top 
protection on the big end of 
hospital and doctor 
bills with rate control front 
end shared pay features. 

SHARED PAY 
COMPREHENSIVE is a 
product for the times. It's 
quality protection with 
students assuming reasonable 
out-of-pocket responsibility. 

Students share in the cost of 
services. Students pay 50% of 
the bill until S250 is paid out 
for a single contract and $500 
for a family contract. Once the 
shared pay maximum has been 
paid out, then Blue Cross and 
Blue Shield pays 100% for 
covered services. 

Services provided at Lafene Student Health Center are 
covered 100%. 

It's competitively priced, and it's from Blue Cross and 
Blue Shield of Kansas. 

Find out about it firsthand. Contact Lafene Student 
Health Center. Student Government Office, or the local 
Blue Cross and Blue Shield office. 

Effective date of coverage will be August 24, 1987. Final 
enrollment will be September 14, 1987. 



Blue Cross and Blue Shield 




David McKee 

District Representative 

(913J 539-4861 

2314 Andersen. Suite 205 
Manhattan. Kansas 66502 




Ctmy tr* Qfnni; Qjrj* 



The card that care (or tlw US Olympic tarn"' 

An equ*> opfAvlUHif r empvr*' 
*» ftayislered Marks. B.y» frott and Blue Snmtd Assomaiion 



' 



— * 



^— »• 



f m * r > ■ 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Friday. Auguit 28. 19S7 



Construction begins on water district 



Company 
tofinish 
by Nov. 1 



By Judy Lunctstrom 

Special Projects Editor 

By Nov. 1, Mochlman Bottoms 
residents should be able to put away 
their 5 -gallon water coolers. 

Riley County Commissioners 
approved at their meeting Thursday a 
bid of $40,708 from Larson Con- 
struction of Manhattan to install a 
water district for Mochlman 
Bottoms. 

Other bids received were B.A. 
Durst Contractors of Topcka, 
$41,696; Manhattan Trenching Inc., 
$42,374; Wallers- Morgan Inc., 
$44,270; and Habitats Inc.. Manhat- 
tan, $50,997. 

The water district was approved 
by commissioners April 27 after resi- 
dents near the Riley County Landfill 
petitioned the county to provide them 
with city water because of contami- 
nation in the area. 

The first contamination was 
detected by Kansas Department of 
Health and Environment agents in 
November 1985 on the properly of 



Charlene Sweet, a landfill employee 
who owns a home adjacent to the 
landfill. The second was discovered 
a year later on the property of John 
Pratt Jr., 1,000 feet southeast of the 
landnil. 

The water district plan was 
designed by BG Consultants Inc., 
Manhattan, and will be an extension 
of ihe Hunter's Island Water District, 
which was installed two years ago 
because of similar water contamina- 
tion problems. New water lines will 
serve about 30 private homes and 
two trailer courts, one with six units 
and one with 14 units. 

While Mochlman Bottoms resi- 
dents are relieved the water system 
will be installed, they are not happy 
with the amount of time that has 
elapsed since the contamination was 
detected. 

Since July, several residents have 
been hauling water from Manhattan 
in 5-gallon water coolers supplied by 
the county. 

"Isn't that a joke?" said Corinne 
Glessner, who lives east of ihe land- 
fill. "When you drink the water, it 
tastes worse man the water out of our 
spigots because it tastes like plastic." 

Glessner said that since news 
came out about the water contamina- 
tion, Mochlman Bottoms residents 
have been inundated with calls from 
people who want to test their water or 
sell them a purification system. 



"Nobody cares," she said. "Some- 
times we feel like packing up and 
leaving." 

County Engineer Dan Harden said 
commissioners have yet to decide 
who will pay for the new water 
district 

"I'm sure the county wilt pay the 
contractor directly out of the landfill 
budget," he said. "But I don't know if 
there will be any attempt to recapture 
that cost You and I may end up pay- 
ing for it," 

The deadline for installation of the 
system is Dec. 31, according to the 
KDHE order. 

In a related matter, commissioners 
approved a request for a $30,000 
grant from the Housing and Urban 
Development project to hire a con- 
sultant to work with the county's Sol- 
id Waste Management Committee. 
The committee, mandated by KDHE 
in its landfill closure order, is to be 
appointed by Sept. 1 and will be in 
charge of revising the Riley County 
Solid Waste Management Plan, 
Harden said. 

If the gram is approved, the county 
will allocate an additional S7.500, he 
said. Most of the $37,500 will go 
toward the consultant's fees and 
research for waste disposal 
alternatives. 

County Planner Monty Wcdel said 
a KDHE official suggested that com- 
missioners conduct a public survey 



and ask other county organizations 
for input into the search for a new 
disposal plan. 

One suggestion, Wcdel said, was 
to involve some K-Siate clubs as citi- 
zen advisory groups. 

Commissioner Darrell Wcstcrvclt 
did not approve of this suggestion. 

"There must be hundreds of clubs 
on campus, and I can't sec how they 
would be interested in how Riley 
County handles its waste," he said. 

Because the Solid Waste Manage- 
ment Committee will comprise 24 
members, Wcstcrvclt said he was 
concerned the plan would get "too 
unwieldy" if more groups were 
involved. 

"My concern is that it'll sink from 
it's own weight," he said. 

Once formed, the committee must 
complete a list of plan topics by Oct. 
1, and come up with a proposal for a 
new waste disposal plan by May 1, 
1989, according to KDHE orders. 

In other action, commissioners 
approved a $30,000 state grant appli- 
cation for a water facilities planning 
and feasibility study for the Fairmont 
Water Project. 

If the grant is awarded, the county 
will add an additional $7,500 to the 
project, Wcdel said. The money will 
be used to hire an engineering firm to 
examine the water conditions in the 
area, which includes the Fairmont 



Officials halt test firing 



By The Associated Press 

BRIGHAM CITY. Utah — A crit- 
ical full-scale test of the new space 
shuttle booster rocket engine was 
scrubbed Thursday after a scries of 
delays including two final count- 
downs halted with less than 15 sec- 
onds to go. 

Officials of Morton Thiokol Inc., 
manufacturer of the rocket, said the 
test firing would be postponed until I 
p.m. Saturday. 

The 1.2 million-pound rocket was 
scheduled to burn for about two 
minutes in a ground test of four rede- 
signed joints in its steel hull, changes 
in redesign that are expected to cor- 
rect the flaws that caused the Chal- 
lenger accident. 

The redesigned rocket has been 
tested in sub-scale firing, but Thurs- 
fcy's test war to Have been the first 
Involving the full, 126-foot rocket 
booster. 

National Aeronautics and Space 
Administration officials have said 
that the test is the most critical yet of 
the rocket booster redesign program. 

None of the series of delays of the 
test was associated with the rocket 
itself. All involved computers or 

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test stand, a plateau cut out on a Utah 
hillside. 

When the third attempt reached 
ihe 13-second point, test coordinator 
Roger Williams of Morton Thiokol 
said over a public address system that 
ihe test firing was scrubbed. 

With more than 500 VIP guests 
watching, technicians from Morton 
Thiokol Inc. counted down the firing 
test to within seconds, then 
announced the test had been aborted. 
Several hours later, the technicians 
were again within seconds of firing 
when the test was halted again. 

Shuttle program director Richard 
Truly visited the technicians' bunker 
during the final countdown and told 
journalists later that he had told tech- 
nicians that if there was another 
problem, that the firing attempt 
should be scrubbed for the day. 

That problem occurred at 4:57 
p.m. 

In the first incident, officials said. 



a cooling system that is part of the 
horizontal test stand failed. An 
8-inch water line sprung a leak, said 
Morton Thiokol spokesman Roland 
Raab. The water is used to cool the 
back of the rocket after firing, 

In addition to fixing the cooling 
system, engineers also had to check 
whether they needed to recharge 
highspeed cameras and an auxiliary 
power unit. The second test, which 
had been scheduled for 5 p.m. EDT, 
was halted because of computer 
problems. The reason for halting the 
third countdown was not immediate- 
ly announced. 

The firing is the first of a scries of 
full-scale ground tests the new solid 
fuel rocket must pass before the 
shuttle fleet is permitted to fly again. 
The first shuttle flight is scheduled 
next June 2. 

A flawed Joint that leaked super- 
heated exhaust gases is blamed for 
the Jan. 28, 1986, explosion that 
destroyed Challenger 




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Editorial 



Kansas State Collegian ■ Friday, August 28. 1987 ■ Page 4 



Foreigners dominate Berlin life, politics 



Political images such as "Checkpoint 
Charlie," "the besieged island of democracy" 
and John Kennedy declaring "Ich bin cin Ber- 
liner" tend to dominate the expectations of 
most visitors when they visit Berlin for the 
first time. Although this city offers more than 
a lesson in politics, its political background 
reflects the world we live in. 

Lying not on the border between East and 
West Germany, but rather 110 miles inside 
East German territory, the famous Wall 
encircles West Berlin like a ring of steel. Try 
to imagine Kansas to be a Soviet-Block 
nation, but Manhattan as an island of Western 
society, surrounded by a wall and separated 
from the 'free world' by about the same dis- 
tance separating us from Missouri. 

Imagine trying to explain this ludicrous 
situation to Thomas Jefferson, or some extra- 
terrestrial. 

"You sec, Mr. Jefferson, in the London 
Protocol agreement of 1944 the Allies — Bri- 
lian. the Soviet Union, the United Slates and 
later France — agreed to divide Germany and 
Berlin into four administrative sectors. Since 
the Soviets and the Western Allies have diffe- 
rent notions about how people are to be gov- 



erned, the three sectors of the Western Allies 
eventually united to form West Germany. 
The three Western sectors of Berlin were 
similarly combined to form West Berlin. 

Pretty soon, lots of East Germans began 
leaving for the West. But as the East saw it 
was loosing too many people to the West, it 
built some big fences between East and West 
Germany, and some big walls between West 
Berlin and East Germany. Now the people 
the East wants to slay in the East do, although 
some Westerners still go to the East — with 
some difficulty." 

Around this point in what I thought would 
be a reasonable explanation, I imagine the 
aliens packing up and heading back to their 
planet in disgust, and Jefferson returning to 
the Age of Enlightenment. 

But for those of us stuck here on the 
present-day Earth, the Allies administered 
Berlin jointly until 1948, when things began 
to split up. After 1948, one of the things East 
and West did jointly in Berlin was guarding 
old Nazis in a West Berlin prison named 
Spandau. As the last of the Spandau Nazis, 
Rudolf Hess, died a couple of weeks ago, this 
joint activity has ceased, the prison will be 



Court helps children 
by stopping book ban 



School children have won a better 
education. The 1 1th U.S. Circuit 
Court of Appeals overturned an Ala- 
bama judge's order banning 44 tex- 
tbooks from Alabama public 
schools. 

The books promoted what the 
judge called a godless, humanistic 
religion. These texts were thrown 
out because they promoted ideas of 
self-responsibility and decision- 
making. 

One home economics text was 
banned because of a statement say- 
ing that people can do whatever they 
want and become whatever they 
choose. 

The word "banned" can put fear 
into many people's hearts, and right- 
ly so, because how do we know who 
should make the decisions and what 
the criterion for those decisions 
should be based upon? 

In the Alabama textbook case, 
one judge made the initial decision. 



and a panel of three judges over- 
turned it. 

Does this mean banning decisions 
should be made by committees? Or 
does this warn us that banning can 
become potentially out of hand? 

If we ban an entire book for one 
sentence or word, then shouldn't 
most, if not all, books be banned? 
And if all books are banned, where 
would knowledge come from? The 
government, the pope, imagina- 
tions? But there wouldn't be any 
imagination without books. 

Nobody can be shielded from 
everything. If they don't read about 
it, they'll see or hear about it. It is 
impossible to try to shield people 
from ideas. As John Milton wrote in 
"Areopagitica," society is based 
upon the marketplace of free ideas. 

Since the basis of education in the 
United States is the public school 
system, the marketplace of free ideas 
should be open to students. 



K-State should retain 
admission procedure 

The lobbyists who discouraged 
the Legislative Educational Plan- 
ning Committee not to advise the 
Legislature to adopt more tougher 
requirements for entrance into 
Regent institutions have a point 

Some legislators believe higher 
education costs are increasing 
because freshmen courses are 
flooded with students who do not 
remain in school, and universities 
must provide remedial courses for 
the unprepared students; subjects 
they should have learned in high 
school. 

Now, all graduates of Kansas high 
schools are admitted to the state's six 
universities. K -State, being a land- 
grant institution, should advocate 
honoring this policy. 

Even minimal requirements could 

set up an "elitist" atmosphere, and 

many potential students could lose 

out. Older students and veterans 



would have to comply to the same 
kind of standards. The fact that some 
students weren't motivated in high 
school doesn't necessarly mean they 
won't excell in college. 

"Lenient" entrance requirements 
does not imply second-rate academ- 
ics. Being a land-grant university, K- 
State has a responsibility to be as 
accessible as possible to Kansans. 

If the problem is high school stu- 
dents not learning enough to tackle a 
college load, the requirements 
should be aimed there. If their educa- 
tion cannot carry them though Col- 
lege Alegebra, are they expected to 
be functioning citizens? 

Telling students that high school 
was not enough and they cannot 
enroll is not the answer. All potential 
students should have the opportunity 
to use their high school education as 
a springboard for a better future. 



Kansas State Collegian 



EDITOR 

Deron Johnson 
MANAGING EDITOR 

Becky Lucas 
NEWS EDITOR 

Jeff Bielscr 



EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR 

Christine Doll 
PHOTO/GRAPHICS EDITOR 

John Thclander 
ADVERTISING MANAGER 

Judy Goctz 



EDITORIAL BOARD: Judd Annis, Kirk Caraway, Jenny Chaulk, Christine Doll, 
Michael Krucgcr, Deron Johnson. Candy Leonard, Becky Lucas, Judy Lundslrom. 
Michael Nichols, Patti Paxson, Chad Sanborn 

THE COLLEGIAN (USPS 2*1 629) n publithed by Student Pubtteaaitttl tneJUtHM Slate L'niveivLiy.dadydurwi, the fall 
and tpnng lenra except Saturday*. Sunday*, holiday* and Umvcmiy wcalim prtiodi Of KU TS ate in die north wing of 
Kedzte H*U, phone 532-W5S SECOND CLASS POST AGS paid M Mjnhuiin.Kin $6302 SL'tlSCKlPTION HATES: 
calaidar year. J40; academic year. $35. wmeatcr. $2fr.tummerlcnn,SlO Addnsa change* and letlcn to the editor *hr*il<J be 
•cut to the Kinia* State Collegian, Ked'ic Hall 10, Kama, SUM I njvtritty, Manhattan. Kan W06. 



Commentary 




Dan 
Owens 

Collegian 
Columnist 



destroyed and a British army supermarket 
will be built in its place... 

The only other thing East and West do 
together is plan the air traffic into Berlin. In 
1948, the Soviets tried to starve West Berlin 
into submission by closing the land supply 
routes between West Berlin and Western 
Germany. The Western Allies responded 
with the famous Berlin airlift, flying in more 
than 2.7 million tons of supplies during the 
13-month siege. Even then, the Soviets met 
with the Western Allies to coordinate the 
flights of the Western Aircraft which would 
foil the Soviet blockade attempt! 



In the early l Q 70s, several agreements 
which eased tensions in Berlin were reached. 
Travel into the East was made easier, and 
among other things, the East Germans agreed 
to lake out the West Berliners' trash. West 
Berlin has also recently hooked up to the 
Soviet Trans-Siberian pipeline. Of course, 
West pays East for these services with 'hard 
currency' i.e. Deutsche Marks. 

Although the West German Basic Law (the 
constitution) declares West Berlin a part of 
West Germany, the Allies do not recognize 
this, instead dictating that West Berlin is still 
under Allied administration. No West Ger- 
man troops are allowed in Berlin and the citi- 
zens there, unlike all 18-year-old males in 
West Germany, are not subject to the military 
draft. In violation of the London Protocol, 
East Germany has made East Berlin its capi- 
tal and drafts males residing in East Berlin. 

West Berlin may elect its own govern- 
ment, but the Western Allies have final say in 
all affairs. In practice this veto power is rarely 
excercised, but the Allies still do not allow 
West Berliners active representation in the 
West German Bundestag. Despite this, West 
Germany lakes very good care of West 



Berlin. 

Both East and West Germany pump lots of 
money into their halves of Berlin. At the Ger- 
man Institute for Developmental Aid, I was 
told West Germany spends about $5.5 billion 
supporting West Berlin - not bad for a city 
with a population of less than 1 .9 million. The 
Soviet Union supports 10.2 million Cubans 
on little more than $3 billion a year, 

I've no figures on East German funds for 
East Berlin, but everyone I have spoken to, 
from officers in the U.S. embassy in East Ber- 
lin to West German political scientists, agree 
East Berlin receives lots of funds from East 
Germany, 

I asked an East German girl what she 
thought of the city's 750th birthday party 
being celebrated. She responded, "I think it's 
terrible. East Germany is a very poor country, 
yet the government spends lots of money 
dressing up Bc/lin because of the tourists 
from the West who come here, and the money 
is needed elsewhere." 

Both East and West Berlin have been 
turned into extravagant showplaces for the 
respective sides in the East-West confronta- 
tion. 




Readers pose puzzles 

Writer helps make life easier 



Dear Jeff, 

I have long been a fan of George Carlin's 
sense of humor. He is, in my opinion, our 
country's best comedian. The other night I 
saw a taped version of his "seven words you 
can't say on television," which got me to 
thinking. Are there any words or phrases that 
a writer can't say in the Collegian? And if 
there are, could you break the rules just this 
once and print them in your column? 

Signed, 
Curious George the Second 

Dear Curious George. 

The K-State Collegian is very sensitive to 
the needs of the student body which it serves. 
Great pains are taken to keep it from ever 
becoming an administration mouthpiece. 
However, there are a few touchy phrases and 
innuendoes that Collegian suffers are strong- 
ly encouraged to avoid. These include "Wef- 
er Madness" to replace phrases like "Presi- 
dent Wefald's proposal," "the Wefald admi- 
nistration," or "a reception at the president's 
home." Aheam Fieldhouse is never to be 
rcfered to as the "Cat House," and the Gay 
and Lesbian Resource Center is not to be 
listed as an extension of Dykstra Hall. Final- 
ly, with the University of Kansas- K -State 
football game drawing near, writers are asked 
not to abbreviate the postgame activities of 
the semi-annual K-Siatc-KU as BYOBBVB 
(bring your own beer, bricks, and Volkswa- 
gen bugs). 

Dear Jeff, 

I am a former chemical engineering major 
who just switched to pre — law. 1 like my new 
course of study fine, except for one large 
problem — none of my old, engineering 
pick-up lines work on the ladies in my new 
classes. My former best line, "Hey babe, 
Willi's the square root of 4,761?" won't even 



Commentary 




Jeff 
Schrag 

Collegian 
Columnist 



get me the time of day anymore, i used to be 
considered the "Casanova of the periodical 
chart." What can I do to fill up this void in my 
life? 

Signed, 
The Suave Strikeout King 

Dear Your Majesty, 

I think your problem may be that you are 
trying too hard to gain a new nickname, like 
the "Courtroom Casanova" or "BMOB (big 
man on briefs)." You should relax and let 
your natural charm attract people to you. 
Besides, because you are from Kansas, you 
are already ahead of all the other male pre — 
law students in America. Take, for example, 
the cases of Gary Hart and Jim Bakker. Gary 
Han is from our fair state, and he got to spend 
a weekend with Donna Rice. Jim Bakker is 
not from Kansas, and he has to spend a life- 
time with Tammy Faye, 

Furthermore, if things don't work out, you 
always have an alternative. I'm sure there is 
quite a demand for attorneys with Chemical 
Engineering backgrounds in San Francisco. 

Dear Jeff, 

I am one of the many Democrats who is 
running for the presidency, and I have an 



image problem. There are so many of us, and 
it is so far from the election date, that none of 
us seems to be able to gain any popularity 
above the rest. We are like several Santa 
Clauses racing down the same chimney - 
we're all stuck in the middle. How could I 
separate myself from the mass and emerge as 
the front runner? 

Signed, 
Void of Votes 

Dear Void. 

Since you did not sign your loiter, I cannot 
tell which of the Democratic candidates you 
are and won't be able to help you personally. 
Thus, I will give my advice to all the candi- 
dates, and the first one to get a Collegian will 
have the advantage. 

The problem I see is that all of you are 
using the same type of approach — dedicated 
family man, budget balancer, and commie 
killer. None of you are brave enough to try 
something different I can always remember 
rhymes and gimmicks better than I can 
remember dull slogans. So, my advice to you 
is to lake one of the following, and make it a 
household song. 

If you are Sen. Nunn, I would make a pun 
by saying, "Get into the habit!" or if you are 
Gov. Dukakis, make fun of the word caucus, 
and say. "Vote for me in Dukakis." Rep, 
Gephardt should remember that Gary Hart 
dropped the 'pensc* from his name, and was 
unsuccessful. Maybe you should drop the 
'hart' from your name. And finally, Sen. Joe 
Bidcn could use his first name in a catchy 
way, such as, "I'm not Joe mama; I 'm not Joe 
daddy; I'm Joe Biden. Vote for me." 

As Tor the rest of the pack, my mind is a 
blank. But considering what was just written, 
that may be in your best interests. 



**h 



~A i j» — 



Senator dispels rumors 



KAH>A» TAT1 COlLgQMH, Friday, Augtit 28, 1»S7 



By The Associated Press 

ATLANTA — Sen. Sam Nunn of 
Georgia dashed the hopes of conser- 
vative Democrats on Thursday with 
his announcement that he would not 
run for president in 1988 although he 
said "I felt like the chances of win- 
ning were really there." 

Nunn, chairman of the Armed Ser- 
vices Committee, said his Senate and 
family responsibilities came first. 
His decision ended a year of specula- 
tion and disappointed Democrats 
who wanted a candidate who could 
attract crucial votes in the conserva- 
tive South. 



Thus far, Nunn said, no candidate 
has emerged "with the expression of 
the kind of philosophy and the kind 
of values that the people of the South 
arc looking for. 

"That doesn't mean that could not 
happen, but I believe the Democratic 
Party in the South is a profile of the 
general election type of voter thai we 
will have in 1988," Nunn told a news 
conference. 

Earlier, Nunn, 48, had sent a five- 
paragraph letter to supporters that 
told of his decision. 

"I know myself pretty well, and I 
have concluded that if I attempted to 
run for president, and also carry out 



my Senate duties, I would wind up 
doing neither well," the letter said. 

"With a son in high school and a 
daughter in college, I am also con- 
cerned about the impact of a pres- 
idential campaign on my family." 

The three-term senator, his party's 
leading expert on defense matters, 
had postponed his presidential deci- 
sion last February, citing his duties 
on the Armed Services pane! and his 
assignment to the Iran-Contra select 
committee. 

In his letter, Nunn did not discuss 
his future political plans or say which 
candidate he will support for the par- 
ty's nomination. He wrote supporters 



that "the Democratic Party has an 
impressive slate of candidates active- 
ly campaigning, with the possibility 
of others entering the process." 

The only Southerner in the race is 
Sen. Albert Gore Jr. of Tennessee, 
who said he expects to benefit from 
Nunn's decision. 

Other Democrats officially in the 
race include Sens. Joseph Biden of 
Delaware and Paul Simon of Illinois, 
Rep. Richard Gephardt of Missouri, 
Massachusetts Gov. Michael Duka- 
kis and former Arizona Gov. Bruce 
Babbitt. The Rev. Jesse Jackson and 
Rep. Patricia Schrocdcr of Colorado 
are likely candidates. 



Board to examine 
health proposals 



S. Korean officials blame leftists 



By The Associated Press 

SEOUL, South Korea —The gov- 
ernment vowed Thursday to crush 
leftists who incite strikers to political 
violence and said a Justice Ministry 
team was arresting agitators dis- 
guised as workers. 

Strikers and riot police fought in 
the southern port city of Masan and at 
Inchon, the port west of Seoul. Hun- 
dreds of strikes around the country 
continued to impair auto production, 
shipbuilding, electronics, mining, 
transportation and many other 
industries. 

The main opposition alliance 



called for anti-government rallies 
Friday to mourn the death of a ship- 
yard worker who became the first fat- 
ality of more than a month of labor 
unrest when he was hit by a tear gas 
shell. 

Prime Minister Kim Chung-yut 
said leftist elements are trying to cre- 
ate a socialist society by fomenting 
turmoil or revolution that would 
destroy the existing political and 
social order. 

It was the first major government 
policy statement on the strikes for 
higher pay, better working condi- 
tions and free unions that have swept 
the country since early July and 



crippled the export-based economy. 

"The government is firmly deter- 
mined to root out impure leftist for- 
ces from our society with all the law- 
enforcing power we can mobilize 
from now on to maintain law and 
order," Kim said in a televised 
speech. 

Justice Minister Chung Hae-chang 
said police and government prosecu- 
tors had formed a special team to 
stamp out leftist agitation. He said 
more than 60 people had been 
arrested since Aug. 20, including lef- 
tist agitators disguised as workers. 

Police announced 1 2 of the arrests 
Thursday. They said most of those 



detained were former student activ- 
ists and more would be rounded up. 

Students traditionally are in the 
vanguard of South Korean protest. 
They led weeks of anti-government 
agitation that caused President Chun 
Doo-hwan to agree June 30 to oppo- 
stton demands for such democratic 
reforms as direct presidential elec- 
tions and less government control of 
unions. 

Successive governments have 
cooperated with business to make 
strikes virtually illegal and hold 
wages down so the exports that drive 
the economy will be cheaper. 



By Candy Leonard 

Government Editor 

It could tum out to be a "dog 
fight" when the Riley County- 
Manhattan Board of Health takes 
another look at proposed dog and 
cat ordinances during its noon 
meeting today. 

"I would hope that we finish 
this up," said Richard Hayter, city 
commissioner and health board 
member. "Our intention is to set 
our final recommendations." 

If the Board is in agreement, the 
ordinances will then be presented 
to the city and county commis- 
sions. Hayter said kennel regula- 
tions are the "single most impor- 
tant issue" in the proposed 
ordinances. 

After reviewing the model 
ordinances with city staff, Jim 
Pearson, assistant city manager, 
told the board in a letter that "stan- 
dards still do not exist that would 
allow us to control these shelters 
in an effective manner. Further, 
we are not sure this ordinance is 
the appropriate place to consider 



this issue." 

"The city commission can cer- 
tainly regulate (kennels) if they 
want to," said Bill Frost, city 
attorney. "It is legally 
permissible." 

The ordinances are designed to 
give authority to the Board of 
Health to draw up specific rules 
and regulations governing the 
protection and keeping of ani- 
mals, said Chuck Murphy, direc- 
tor of the Riley County- 
Manhattan Health Department. 

"Hopefully, this will allow for a 
more consolidated effort for the 
health department," he said. 

After Jan. 1, the Parks and 
Recreation Department will no 
longer administer the animal war- 
dens and animal shelter, he said. 

"The new animal shelter 
required that we update our city 
ordinances," said Su Bacon, vice 
president of the Riley County 
Humane Society. 

The Board of Health will also 
consider the question of restrain- 
ing cats to the owners' property. 



Contras willing to try peace initiatives 



By The Associated Press 

LOS ANGELES — Leaders of the 
Nicaragua n rebel movement were 
poised Thursday to assure President 
Reagan of their willingness to give 
Central American peace initiatives a 
chance. 

The six members of the civilian 
directorate governing the Nicant- 
guan Resistance traveled here to con- 
fer with Reagan, their most visible 



supporter, after signaling a willing- 
ness to see U.S. military aid sus- 
pended in the interest of peace. 

Reagan, who earlier this week told 
the Nicaraguan people in a radio 
broadcast that your struggle "always 
will have" his support, arranged to 
meet with the Contra leaders in his 
Century Plaza Hotel penthouse suite. 

White House officials had ack- 
nowledged last week that a principal 
reason for Reagan meeting with the 



leaders was for the president to show 
publicly that he will not abandon the 
Contras. 

On the eve of their meeting with 
Reagan here, Contra spokesmen said 
the rebels would propose to Reagan 
that their military aid be suspended 
— or held in abeyance — to show 
their commitment to peace in Central 
America. 

Azucena Ferry Echaverry, a mem- 
ber of the Contra directorate, told 



reporters in Miami that "we have 
proposed that aid could be stopped 
when a peace agreement was 
reached." 




KRYSTALLOS 

'BEAUTIFUL OBJECTS 
FROM THE EARTH" 

•Crystals •Minerals 
•Gifts & more 

Highway 24 East 

(By the L.W. WUion Cabinet Shop) 

Thurt.Sun. 10:30-6 
539-0360 



p COMMONWEALTH THEATRES 



SETHCHILDS 

CINEMAS 



Times Good 
Starling Friday 



The Big Easy m 

Derm If Qu«id • Elian Bar kin 

F-Sun 2:20, 4:30, 7:0$, 9:35 
M-th. 7:05, 9:35 



No Way Out <m 

Kevin CMtntr • Ctne Hactoiwi 

F-Sun, 1:50, 4:15, 7:10, 9:30 

M-th. 7:10.. 9:30 



Born in East L.A. (R> 

CtlMch Marin 

F-Sun. 2:T0, 4:40, 7:15, 9:25 
M-Th. 7:15, 9:25 



Can't Buy Ma Love 

(PG-13) 

F-Sun. 2:00, 4:35, 7:20, 9:20 
M-Th. 7:20, 9:20 



The Living Daylights 

(PG) 

F- Sun. 1:45, 4:25, 7:00, 9:40 
M-Th 7:00, 9:40 



Sf B( 



The Lost Boys m 

F-Son. 2:30. 4:45, 7:30, 9:45 
M-Th. 7:30. 9:45 



MOVIE INFORMATION 
776-9886 or 762-4094 



KMKF ROCKS 101* 



*zr% 



tBackTo School 




Two Models 

To pick from— File Cabinets 

For office or home 

*79 and up.... 

Student/Home Office Chairs 
'75.00 and up.... 




I 



School- 
Work Desks! 

20x40 Reg '1 74. Sale-* 1 35 
24x54 Reg *258, Sale * 195 i 
30x60 Reg *306, Sale '230 



Chairs! 



Godfathers Pizza 

welcomes the 
Students at K.S.U. 



Pizza without the wait. 




539-5303 

1118 Laramie 



Finally, a cure (or your 

Instant Pizza Emergency Hot 

Slice " at Godfathers Pizza " lets 

you enjoy choice cuts of luscious pizza 

for lunch without the wait you experience at 

other restaurants. 

Hot Slice available Monday- Friday, 11:30 a.m.-l :30 p.m. 

GOOF- 



PIZZA 




HOT SLICE LARGE PIZZA 
s 3.1 9 Special [ MEDIUM PRICE! 



HOT SLICE 



2for$2 2fer$12 

* 0*t two matftuffi ipKiil 

Iptzua fTh# Itawhwom 
o# Tha Four Tapper) tor jutt 
list ___ 

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■ w r*L4Nftt Vaw D"*t * p*n«-<u»Aa 

ICttriftMW* Pi&j m ia un ivt pu na 
J afcu a^ WM too I' kx <M*Hh T 



Haoatv* arm Hd She* Pizza 
by m* SKc*. on* irtatalht 
Mi*d bar and ■ m*dk*m tfnnk 
tor only 13 J« 
w* +m r .«te » it m *.« I » P * 

GnfHnof tarriWl 

v*m ar*i * parmfM&ng God jihfw \ 



Iroco h "! any Ian** OricanaJ or 
Slutted Pttw tor tht prtoa of 
emadai it v 

IfiMD-Wi CflfTHHt. O* DWBWf 
On lHUll if** tntw* ■#■**•» «•* 
ih* toucrnn or k*k« *&**n^ <y ow 

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. t 


• 




KANSAS STAT* COLLEGIAN , Frld.y, Augutl 2». 1M7 



Credit Union offering more than loans 



By Erwin Seba 

Collegian Reporter 

The University's Federal Credit 
Union is considering expanding the 
services it offers to members. 

The credit union, located in 
Anderson Hall, offers savings 
accounts, loans and certificates of 
deposit to its members. Only faculty, 
staff and graduate students teaching 
or doing research are qualified to 
become members of the union. 

"The board of directors is looking 
into including some other services lo 
make us more of a full-service finan- 
cial institution," said Maria Mann, 
credit union manager. 

Among the additional services 



Auto tellers a possible addition 



being considered are share draft 
accounts, automatic teller machines 
and traveler's checks, Mann said. 
Share draft accounts are equivalent 
to bank checking accounts. 

"It's called a share draft because 
we're a credit union and they're a 
bank. They have accounts; we have 
shares. Our members get shares in 
the credit union. The shares go in $5 
increments," she said. 

"A credit union is member-owned. 
It's unique and different from other 
financial institutions," Mann said. 
"Our members own the credit union 



and have all the say in operating the 
credit union." 

The only employees of the credit 
union are Mann, a teller and a loan 
officer. The board of directors, the 
credit committee and the supervisory 
committee are alt comprised of vol- 
unteers from the credit union's 
membership. 

Protecting the privacy of the mem- 
bers is important, said Mann. 

"Confidentiality is very important 
We won't give information to the 
wife of a member if her name's not 
on the account," she said. 



The credit union, which is open 
Monday-Friday 9 a.m. to 4 p.m„ also 
works to keep the information on 
loan applications confidential. 

"We have our loan officers; they 
approve all loans," Mann said. "They 
are only qualified to approve loans. 
They cannot deny a loan. That pro- 
tects a member." 



If there is a question about a loan 
application, such as if a person is 
over obligated and the loan officer 
cannot approve the loan, then the 
application goes to the credit com- 
mittee, she said. If there is a conflict 
of interest between an applicant and a 
member of the committee, the com- 
mittee member will normally bow 



Moscow: Reagan's 'preaching' 
damaging arms pact chances 



By The Associated Press 

MOSCOW —President Reagan is 
trying to instruct the Soviet Union 
like a teacher "preaching to a naught- 
y boy" and may destroy chances for a 
nuclear arms agreement, the Foreign 
Ministry spokesman said Thursday. 

Gennady I. Gerasimov was 
responding to a speech Wednesday 
in which Reagan asked the Kremlin 
to publish its military budget and the 
size of its armed forces and permit 
open debate on military policy. He 
said those actions would "greatly 
help our efforts to reduce arms," 

Gerasimov said at a briefing for 
foreign reporters that Reagan's 
address "literally abounds in 
demands of what the Soviet Union 
must or should do. Docs it benefit the 
head of the administration, whose 
reputation has been so stained by the 
Irangate scandal and who has been 
repeatedly found to be violating con- 
stitution and laws, to put forward 
such demands?" 



"It has become almost a rule that 
before every important Soviet- 
American meeting, the American 
side starts to play up the hostility," he 
said. "Now, unfortunately, the presi- 
dent has started to do iL" 

Moscow's decision to take the 
offensive appeared aimed in part at 
dampening optimism created by 
Chancellor Helmut Kohl's 
announcement about 72 aging Persh- 
ing 1A missiles belonging to West 
Germany, whose warheads are con- 
trolled by the United States. 

Kohl said Wednesday that West 
Germany would dismantle the mis- 
siles if the Soviets and Americans 
destroy all their intermediate-range 
missiles — weapons with ranges 
between 300 and 3,000 miles. 

The Pershing I As were considered 
the most serious obstacle to a 
U.S. -Soviet agreement on 
intermediate-range weapons, which 
both sides have said was close other- 
wise. West Germany had refused to 
give up either the missiles or its right 




TGIF 
TOSTADO 

BAR FROM 5-7 

PURPLE 
PASSION 
SHOTS 

619 N. 12th,Aggievillc 



PC PURCHASE POWER 

EXTENDED TO STUDENTS/STAFF! 



The State of Kansas has contracted with Tandon for AT-compatible 
personal computers. These computers and others are now available 
through Foresight Solutions to K-State students, faculty and staff at 
low prices such as: 



$895* 



TANDON PCX-2 

This PC-compatible has 640K RAM, two floppy disk drives, 
serial/parallel ports, DOS 3.1 and full one year warranty. 



$1295* 



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This powerful XT-compatible comes with a 20 MB disk drive, 
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RAM, dual speed processor, dual video board, and high speed 
20 MB hard drive, serial /parallel ports, DOS 3.1, PLUS a full 
one year warranty — all for under $2000! 



foresight 



(913)842.7526 SHE* 

* Monitor not included Umtm**, m «*•« 



to modernize them. 

Soviet negotiators say the missiles 
should be part of any agreement 
between the superpowers, since the 
United States controls the warheads. 
The U.S. position is that it will not 
negotiate about third-party weapons 
and the missiles were part of an 
agreement that existed when 
U.S. -Soviet talks began in Geneva. 

Observers suggested that Kohl's 
surprise offer could permit real prog- 
ress on arms con jol at a September 
meeting of Secretary of State George 
P. ShulLt and Eduard A. Shevardnad- 
ze, the Soviet foreign minister, and 
perhaps lead to a third Reagan sum- 
mit with Mikhail S. Gorbachev. 

Reagan has invited the Soviet 
leader to the United States, but Gor- 
bachev says a visit depends on the 
arms negotiations. 

Gerasimov denied a British 
Broadcasting Corp. report that Gor- 
bachev would travel to the United 
States the last three days of Septem- 
ber, 



} WELCOME BACK SPECIAL i 

t BUY ONE CINAMMON ROLL 

i GET ONE FREE! ta \ 

i BAKERY ON THE SQUARE "TRI* 

1217 Moro (Next to Carousel) late night 

a Must present coupon for purchase 
Offer expires Sept. 7, 1987 






10 p. m -2:30 am 
537-ROLL 




K-State Students •*£ 

Join us at g 

First Presbyterian Church If 
801 Leavenworth 1^ 

for ^Im 

A Circus of Christians Dl! <?£> 

This Sunday, August 30 ' JMf^ 

Sunday School-We open our Fall Program at 
9:30 a.m. with a special celebration. We have a 
class just for K.S.U. students. 

Worship-At 8:30 a.m. and 11:00 a.m. we'll 
celebrate communion together as we begin a 
great new year. 

CO.R.-Don't forget to come to room 204 at 
5:30 p.m. on Tuesdays for our CO.R. fellow 
ship and Bible study. 

If s Great to See You 



out 

"I'd have to say if a person didn't 
want his supervisor, who happened 
to be on the credit committee, to 
review his application, he could 
come to us and ask that he (the super- 
visor) not review his application. 
We'd honor that. We're always 
working for that member," Mann 
said. 

"1 see this credit union as having 
the potential of a full-service credit 
union ." 



615 N. Manhaiun 

IWelcome Back 
Students! 

fri. & SAT, 

$3.25 Pitchers 

Drink & Shot Specials 

Haven't You 

Heard? 

Were ROCKIN'I 

at the Horse! 

OPEN DAILY 
at 3 P.M. 

Ill.it 530-9081 Office 776-66381 



NOVELTIES & GIFTS 



S» 




1 128 Moro. Aggieville 539-4567 

A FUN PLACE TO SHOP 

Posters»Sunglasses»Flags 

Mugs»Cards 
Make-up* Party Supplies 
Halloween Masks, Wigs 
& Accessories 
Gag Gifts«FunBooks«Souvenirs 
Adult Gags & Gifts For Any Occasion 
WELCOME BACK, KSU STUDENTS! 
Bring in this ad for a 20% Discount 
Special Rates for Large Parties 




Q— What makes a space truly yours? 
A— Your Plants! 

You'll appreciate our year-round 
selection of healthy Tropicals 

Pots, Baskets and Accessories 

FREE Liquid Fertilizer 

Trained Horticultural Staff 



Horticultural Services 

• Garden Center • 

Mon Sat 8-6 Friday 8:00 7:30 Sun 104 

7765764 
2 mi. east of Manhattan on U.S. 24 



FREE! 



Guitar and 
Bass Strings 
that are worth 
up to $25°° 




Offer Includes { 



BELIEVE IT! 

(no strings attached) 
•Acoustics* Electrics 
• 12 Strings* Basses 




FREE STRING COUPON 

WHEN - This Sat., Aug. 29 

TIME - 1 1 am.-3:30 p.m. 

WHERE 

S.M. HANSON MUSIC INC 

316 Poyntz (Downtown Manhattan) 
776-3000 

Limit One Guitar Per Person 

You must be present white strings are installed 

TEAR OUT AND FILL IN THIS COUPON 

BRING YOUR GUITAR AND COUPON 

TO S.M. HANSON MUSIC INC. 

Name 

Phone 



Address 



Guitar Brand 



Type: ElectO Acousttcn BassO 12 StgO 



KS3 



NOW MANHATTAN'S LARGEST LIQUOR. BEER, MO WINE STORE. STATE 
LAW DOES NOT ALLOW US TO ADVERTISE BRANDS OR PRICE. WE HAVE 

ALL ITEMS DISCOUNTED EVERYDAY IN ALL DEPTS. 

WE HAVE OR WILL HAVE EVERY BRAND OF IMPORTED BEER 
AVAILABLE. WE WILL SOON HAVE A 600 Si FOOT COOLER FOR ALL 
YOUR COLD BEER AND WINES. LOOK FOR OUR FINE WINE ROOM SOON 

TO BE ADDED ON. 

ALL BOURBON, CANADIAN WHISKEY, GIN, VODKA, SCOTCH AND 
WINES ON SALE WE CANT GIVE THE PRICE BUT IT IS THE LOWEST ! 

DROP BY-AND SEE OUR NEW STORE. NOW 4,000 SQ. FT. WE HAVE 
THE LAR6EST STORE AND LAR6EST SELECTIONS. 




^convenience; 

C STORE r* 

2233 Tuttle Creek Blvd. 

Radio-WINE GLASSES-BAR SUPPLIES-CORKSCREWS-ETC 

T-SHIRTS AND ALL YOUR PARTY NEEDS. 

ONE STOP BETS IT ALL 

•Spuds- Mac Kenzie 

T- Shirts 

•14 oz. Mugs 

539-2862 





KANSASJTATf COLLIOIAN, Friday, Awgutf U. 1SS7 




SuflVGreg Vojel 



Couch crossing 

Jim jesik, freshman in architecture, and Paige Nichols, junior in philosophy and English, carry a couch through a crosswalk south of campus Thursday afternoon. 



Woman has 
too many 
yard sales 

By The Associated Press 

TUPELO, Miss. — A woman who 
pleaded innocent to a charge of hold- 
ing too many yard sales says officials 
are peddling rubbish in defending 
their enforcement of a law that 
should be junked. 

City Judge Carroll While on Wed- 
nesday scheduled a Sept. 23 trial for 
Oma Cain, 48, of Tupelo, who was 
ticketed Aug. IS for violating an 
ordinance limiting yard sales to one 
every three months. 

But Cain says she doesn't plan to 
show up. "I'm planning on a trip," 
she said. 

City officials allege Cain has vio- 
lated the ordinance with frequent 
yard sales, including one last month. 

Cain denied the accusation that 
she sold items from her home in July. 



Club gives chance 
to learn about U.N. 



By The Collegian Staff 

K-State students have the oppor- 
tunity to learn how the United 
Nations works without traveling to 
New York. 

The United Nations Council, 
established about six years ago, is 
one of the many clubs offered to K- 
State's student body. 

"The club was founded to better 
inform K-State students and faculty 
about international affairs and proce- 
dures of the United Nations," said 
Jerry Rosenberg, assistant professor 
of political science and faculty advis- 
er for K-State's United Nations 
Council. 

Club membership is open to any- 
one. Last year, the club had 12 mem- 
bers, and Rosenberg said he is hoping 
for more involvement this year. 

"It seems we always have belter 
membership if there is constant crisis 
with global affairs, and this year 
there has been much going on in 
international affairs," he said. 



Activities in the past have 
included lectures by professors and 
presentations of a model security 
council. This year, a trip is being 
planned to Lincoln, Neb., to partici- 
pate in a model United Nations 
Conference, 

During the mock conference, each 
club from universities around the 
country represents one of the IS 
countries in the United Nations. 

The clubs are notified months in 
advance about which country they 
will represent at the conference, 
Rosenberg said. 

Annie Platoff, graduate student in 
history, is a former member of K- 
State's United Nations Council who 
has participated in the model confer- 
ence at Lincoln. 

"At the conference, you are the 
delegate, and you have to think about 
the delegate you represent," Platoff 
said. "You really have to give up all 
your Western values." 



Whi-n you fill out your Form 
W-4 or W-4A. "Employee'* 
Withholding Allowance 
Certificate," remember: 
If you can be claimed on your 
parent't or another porwinS tax 
return, you generally cannot be 
exempt from income tax 
withholding. 



I 



PREGNANT? 

NEED HELP? 

For confidential 



help, call 





irthright 

FREE Pregnancy Tests 

103 S. Fourth 537-9180 






EObBERT RETAIL Ll^flBR 



Start with us for weekend fun 

•Wide Selection 
of Imported Beers 

•Imported and Domestic Wines 

•Case Discounts 

•Cold Kegs Available 

Hoa-SaL 
9 am. -11 p.m. 




539-5757 



501 South 17th 

Old Town Malt 



College of -Agriculture' " 
jBKJAk WATERMELON ^ 




Everyone's welcome, come join the fun! 
All department clubs will be present. 

Tuesday, Sept. 1-6:15 p.m. 
South lawn of Waters Hall 

Sponsored by Ag Student Council $ Alpha Zeia 




WORSHIP 

ON 
CAMPUS 



DANFORTH CHAPEL 

SUNDAYS 11 A.M. 

Communion'Community of Students" 
International Students'lnterdenominational 

EVERYONE WELCOME 

This service is an All -University interdenominational worship to 
provide a caring, responding Christian community on campus. 
We would especially invite international and minority students to 
share in this community so as to deepen interracial, mtercultural 
and global understanding. 

Coordinator: Don Fallon, Campus Pastor 
Holton Hall 102, 532-6432 




WELCOME BACK KSU 

TRY US TODAY 

•Great Mexican Food 
•Relaxing Pleasant Atmosphere 
•Specialties! Chirnichangas— 
Fajitas— Chile Rellenos! 
•Free Parking at our Door 



Open Daily at 11 a.m. 
1219 Bluemont 539-3166 



¥ 

r 

¥ 
r 
r 
r 
r 
r 
r 
v 

¥ 



V 

r 
r 
w 

¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 



Frozen Yogurt 

that tastes we let uresm 

but with 80% less fat! 

- FREE SAMPIES- 

Can't Believe hi 

YOGURT! 

OPEM: 11 i.m. 11p.m. Wy 



^ JEAN STATION 

Featuring 

ESPRIT 




Hour*: M-S 1M 

Thun, 10-8:30, Son. 14 

AggtwNb— MinhirtM 



Collegiate 4-H 
Membership drive 

Sunday, August 30 
5:30 p.m. 

All Students Welcome 

Middle of City Park near rose garden 



Kansas State Bank 





B'nai Brith 

Hillel 
at K-State 

(Campus Jewish Organization) 



PARTY 

for All Students 

Free: Beer 

Non-Alcoholic Beverages 
Munchies, music & games. 

Today!! from 4-8 p.m. 
617 Bluemont 

(enter from alley) 



STUDENT LOANS 






We want to make 
your student loan! 

Simply contact us at: 

537-4400 

Lender Code #821176 



If you have received your promissory note, bring it in or 
mail it to Kansas State Bank, 1010 Westloop or Uth & 
Bluemont. 



Kansas State Bank 



EntertainmentFriday 



Kansas State Collegian ■ Friday, August 28. 1987 ■ Page 8 



Spy, space epics 
prove enjoyable 

Spy movie's characters, 
plot, thriller elements 
add up to good suspense 



By Gary leffler 

Collegian Reviewer 

There are several basic elements 
that are essential to any spy-thriller in 
movie making — a dating hero, a 
beautiful lady, government bureau- 
crats, gun-toting action, fist- 
clenching suspense, murder and, of 
course, Russians. "No Way Out" has 
all of these plus a little extra. 

Film Reviews 

In "No Way Out" Kevin Costner 
plays Tom Parrel! . a confident, if not 
a little cocky, naval commander who 
falls for a shapely Washingtonian 
named Susan, played by Sean 
Young. The two dive into a frenzied 
love affair that leads to trouble and 
eventually murder. 

Gene Hackman portrays Secretary 
of Defense David Brice who with his 
aide, Scott Prichard (Will Patton), 
become entangled in the complex 
web of intrigue and government 
cover-up. 

"No Way Out" does a fine job 
working with all the particulars that 
go hand in hand with a good suspense 
story. From the beginning, the story 
builds upon itself and, after only a 
slightly slow fifteen-minute opening 
(vital to the establishment of 
motives), the story barrels full steam 
ahead to the end. 

However, the film isn't in the prac- 
tice of taking the routine path along 
the thriller trail. Instead of an abun- 
dance of car chases and rooftop leaps 
(although there are a few) the story 
mainly focuses on the emotional, 



nerve-wracking tension that comes 
from the characters* needs for survi- 
val in a cover-up game that turns 
deadly. 

Costner's performance is strong 
and believable. This is by far the sex- 
iest role he has played to date. Early 
on in the film, he and Sean Young 
find themselves in the back of a 
limousine, each one anxious to have 
die other and unable to wait. The 
result is a cramped, yet exciting, love 
scene that ends with Costner telling 
Young, "I'm Tom," to which she 
replies, "I'm Susan." 

Hackman gives us a fine view of a 
man of power — unapproachable to 
those of lesser status, yet fiercely 
dependent upon the love of his mis- 
tress. He takes the politician's role, 
which could have easily been the 
same old red tape, and turns it into a 
deep and complex character torn 
between duty to his country and duty 
to himself. 

A word of praise must also go to 
Young for her spunky and sexy por- 
trayal of Susan and to Patton for his 
rock solid performance as Prichard, 
the ruthlessly loyal aide to Brice. 

However, not everything about 
"No Way Out" is worth praising. 
W hi le the movie does a fine job mo v- 
ing down a tight, tense path to the 
end, the end may leave you wonder- 
ing. You see, there's a twist, and an 
awkward and improbable one at that 

But if you are willing to forget the 
last two minutes of the film, as I soon 
will, you'll be glad you went to see 
"No Way Out" And if you've a 
Kevin Costner or Gene Hackman 
fan, you'll be even more pleased. 



'Masters' film provides 
unexpected enjoyment 
for adults and children 



By Andre Kelly 
Contributing Reviewer 

Everyone knows this hasn't been a 
great summer for movies. 

First, Hollywood assaulted our 
wallets with "Ernest Goes to Camp." 
Then they assaulted our hopes with 
the long-awaited sequel "Beverly 
Hills Cop II," which was a bust. And 
finally the biggest dissapointment of 
all, "Superman IV." 

Now, seemingly from another 
galaxy, comes a film that has sur- 
prised everyone not only because of 
its subject but even more because of 
who made it. 

At any given video store, you'll 
find more bombs from Cannon stu- 
dios than from the Persian Gulf. 
They're responsible for the ongoing 
"Missing in Action" series, Stal- 
lone's "Over the Top," and even the 
man of steel "rusting" in "Superman 
IV." 

The real mystery is how they got 
their hands on a lesser concept, 
"Masters of the Universe" and turned 
it into one of the summer's biggest 
fantasy-adventures. 

Ordinarily, space-epics hit the big 
screen first, toy stores second and 



finally the Saturday morning car- 
toons. This time the process was 
reversed, and it may be a damaging 
factor to the movie's audience appe- 
al. Like the "Star Ware" trilogy, 
"Masters" is not just for kids. It's 
crammed with action, first-rate spe- 
cial effects, a coherent plot and more 
super-villains than you can shake a 
sword at. With its careful attention to 
detail, lavish sets and sweeping 
score, "Masters" has larger-than-life 
excitement and a gutsy comic grand- 
eur that most hero-versus-villain 
yams lack. 

And despite Lundgrcn's broken 
English, he wears the mantle of hero 
very well. Frank Langella's depic- 
tion of Skeletor is supremely evil. 
With his convincing skull make-up, 
ominous commands and shadowy 
hood, he makes Danh Vader look 
like a wimpy biker. 

Believe it or not, "Masters of the 
Universe" is a smash. Violence 
aside, there is absolutely no reason a 
broad secuon of the movie-going 
public won't enjoy this film. And by 
all indications, a sequel can't be too 
far away and given the quality of 
those already being cranked out now, 
it certainly can't be any worse. 



K-State Players' season begins 
as students complete auditions 




Surf/Greg Vogcl 

Tom McLaughlin, graduate student in theater, demonstrates a few 
of his many faces during an audition for "On the Verge." 



By Becky Howard 

Arts ond Entertainment Editor 

The group had assembled on the 
McCain Auditorium stage. Clad in 
sweat pants and T-shirts, they 
closely watched the movements of 
Luke Kahlich, choreographer and 
associate professor of physical edu- 
cation, dance and lelstrn* srtfflKs". 

"OK, just be stupid. Be 
retarded!" Kahlich told them light- 
ly, as he tried to describe how the 
dancing should be for a scene from 
"South Pacific." one of the K-State 
Players' productions students audi- 
tioned for this week. 

They followed Kahlich's lead as 
he instructed them in kicking steps 
and how to do a "bird dog" and a 
"Santa Claus," two dance move- 
ments choreographed in the scene. 

In Nichols Hall, the scene was 
slightly different On the round cen- 
ter stage, actors trying out for the 
play "On the Verge" were grouped 
in threes to read from the script as 
Kale Anderson, associate professor 
of speech and director of the play, 
watched them closely. 

As each of the groups read, 
Anderson laughed at the humorous 
moments in the scene, then she 
applauded and gave words of 
encouragement to the students 
auditioning as they finished. 

Three nights of reading scripts, 
blocking scenes, and teaming 
dance routines and songs culmi- 
nated with callback auditions Wed- 
nesday evening for those audition- 
ing for fall semester performances 
by the K-State Players. 

Auditions were held for two 
plays, "On the Verge" and "The 
Real Thing," and the musical 
"South Pacific." More than 100 
people attended the tryouts held 
Monday and Tuesday. Callback 
auditions on Wednesday evening 
brought more than 60 people for the 
final tryouts. 



Each night, students warmed up 
with physical exercises, then 
learned, practiced and performed 
portions of the production for 
which they were auditioning. The 
directors of each production 
observed the auditions, then nar- 
rowed their selections for cast 
members 

^thc imbm ik' WB* i cry w en." 

We had a wonderful turnout with 
some very talented people, 
although I wish we would have had 
more men trying out for parts," said 
Charlotte MacFarland, instructor in 
speech and director of "South 
Pacific." 

She said, "We had a hard time mak- 
ing a final decision on parts. We 
were up until 3 in the morning. 

"Students take the auditions very 
seriously and work very hard. For 
some it can be a very grueling 
experience ending in disappoint- 
ment and for others a wonderful 
experience," she said. 

MacFarland said those who try 
out for K-State Players productions 
come from a wide variety of 
majors, not just those who are 
majoring in music and theater. 

"We have people from all over 
the spectrum — in engineering and 
business," she said. "We would like 
to have more variety and encourage 
other non -theater majors to try out 
for the productions." 

MacFarland said being involved 
in the productions docs require a 
large amount of lime in rehearsal, 
but many students involved in the 
past have managed many activities, 
including K-State Players. 

"On the Verge," a play written by 
Eric Ovcrmycr, will be performed 
Sept. 24-26. Sept. 30 and Oct. 1-3 
in Nichols Theatre, Written in 
1986, it is a comedy exploring three 
Victorian ladies' adventures 
through space, time and 
imagination. 

"South Pacific" will be per- 



formed Oct. 22-24 in McCain 
Auditorium. This classic musical 
written by Rodgcrs and Hammcrs- 
tcin is a tale of love and prejudice 
on a Pacific island paradise set in 
World War II. 
"The Real Thing" will be per- 



.rmed Nov. 12-14 and Nov. 18-21 
in Nichols Theatre. The story 
revolves around an illustration of 
contemporary love. 

Ticket information may be 

obtained through the Speech 
Department in Nichols Hall. 




SPOTLIGHT 





SPOTLIGHT 

Entertainment for the week ending 
Thursday, September 3. 



EXHIBITS 

"Contemporary Woodcuts in Col- 
or," K-State Union An Gallery 
through Sept. 18. 

"Paper Mache Sculpture by Sylvia 
Beeman," K-State Union 2nd Floor 
Showcase through Sept. 11. 



ENTERTAINMENT 

"Welcome Back Dance," K-State 
Union Catskellar, Friday, 9-12 p.m. 



FILMS 

UNION FORUM HALL 

"Platoon," Friday and Saturday, 7 
and 9:30 p.m. 

"Bedtime for Bonzo," Saturday, 2 
p.m. and Sunday 2 and 7 p.m. 

"Round Midnight," Tuesday and 
Thursday, 7:30 p.m. 

SETH CHILDS CINEMAS 

"The Living Daylights," (PG), 
1:45, 4:25. 7 and 9:40. 

"Robocop," (R) 4:25 and 9:35. 

"Can' t Buy Me Love," (PG- 1 3). 2, 
4:35. 7:20 and 9:20. 

"No Way Out," (R), 1:50, 4:15, 
7:10 and 9:30. 



"The Lost Boys," (R), 2:30. 4:45, 
7:30 and 9:45. 

"Summer School." (PG-13). 2:20 
and 7. 

"Bom in East L.A.," (R), 2:10, 
4:40, 7:15 and 9:25. 

COMMONWEALTH 
THEATERS 

"Stakeout," (R), 7 and 9: 1 5, Cam- 
pus Theater. 

"Dirty Dancing," (PG- 1 3). 2, 4:30, 
7 and 9:30, Westloop 6 Cinemas. 

"Snow White and the Seven 
Dwarfs," (G), 2 and 4: 30, Westloop 6 
Cinemas. 

"North Shore," 7 and 9:30, West- 
loop 6 Cinemas. 



'The Monster Squad," (PG-13), 
2:10, 4:40, 7:10 and 9:20. 

"Back to the Beach," (PC), 2:10. 
4:40, 7:10 and 9:20. 

"Maid to Order," (PG), 2:20, 4:45. 
7:20 and 9:25. 

"Masters of the Universe," (PG), 
2:20. 4:45. 7:15 and 9:25. 

TRAVEL 

"Renaissance Festival (Sept. 19) 
Information Meeting." Tues.. Sept. 
1, 7 p.m.. Union Room 208. 

"Renaissance Festival Sign-up 
Begins," Wed., Sept. 2, Union Activ- 
ities Center. 

RECREATION 

"Sailing and Windsurfing (Sept. 



12-13) Information Meeting," Tues., 
Sept 1, Union Room 207, 7 p.m. 
"Sailing and Windsurfing Sign-up 
Begins," Wed., Sept. 2, Union Activ- 
ities Center. 

UPCOMING EVENTS IN 
SEPTEMBER 

Joe Walsh. Wednesday, Sept. 8, 
Sandstone. 

Kansas State Fair, Hutchinson, 
Sept. 11-20. Activities include n "- 
certs, tractor pulls, car races, demoli- 
tion derbies, sporting events, and 
carnival 

"Survivor." Saturday. Sept. 11, 
Kansas Slate Fair, Hutchinson. 

"Chicago." Friday, Sept. 18, Expo 
Centre, Topeka. 



"Chicago." Saturday, Sept. 19, 
Kansas State Fair, Hutchinson. 

"Farm- Aid," Saturday, Sept. 19, 
University of Nebraska Stadium, 
Lincoln, Neb. 

Roger Miller and Tom Chapin, 
Friday, Sept. 25. McCain 
Auditorium. 

"On the Verge," Sept. 24-26, Sept 
30 and Oct. 1-3, Nichols Theatre. 






"Spotlight" will provide a 
weekly guide to arts and cnter- 
uiinrnent in the area. Any sug- 
gestions, additions or correc- 
tions arc welcomed. 



KANSA* STATE COLLI OIAN, Friday, Augut at, ItfT 



South African strike goes into day 1 8 



By Ths AtsoclottKl Pfts 

JOHANNESBURG, South Africa 
— The nation's largest mining com- 
pany Thursday Tired more than 
18,000 striking black miners, includ- 
ing 3,000 who staged a sit-in a mile 
underground, after their union voted 
lo continue an 18-day-old walkout 

The country's largest black labor 
federation, the Congress of South 
African Trade Unions, said it was 



considering a national strike and 
other "solidarity action" unless the 
mincworkers' wage demands were 
met, 

Anglo American Corp., the com- 
pany wont hit by the strike, said it 
fired about 1 8,400 gold and coal min- 
ers for defying back-to-work ultima- 
tums. Anglo last week fired 7,000 
strikers, and said 14,000 more face 
dismissal if they do not return to 
work Saturday. 



Among those dismissed were 
3,000 men who staged an 1 8 -hour sit- 
in inside Anglo's Western Deep 
Levels gold mine. Anglo did not say 
why the men staged the protest, but 
the National Union of Mincworkers 
said the men were forced under- 
ground Wednesday night by mine 
security. 

The strikers were brought to the 
surface Thursday afternoon, given 
their final pay checks and driven off 



the mine compound in buses, some of 
the miners said. 

The mass dismissals came after 
union members voted overwhelm- 
ingly Wednesday to reject an indus- 
try proposal that offered slight 
improvements in benefits but no 
additional pay. The union said it 
would accept a 27 percent pay raise, 
instead of its previous demand of 30 
percent, but the Chamber of Mines 
refused to alter its already imple- 



Agencies agree to discontinue practices 



men ted increase of 15 lo 23 percent. 

With the strike again deadlocked, 
the Congress of South African Trade 
Unions — of which the miners* 
union is the largest affiliate — 
announced a series of steps it would 
lake in support of the miners. 

Jay Naidoo, general secretary of 
the 750,000-mcmber congress, said 
international trade unions might be 
asked to order members not to handle 
South African coal and gold. 

In addition, union leaders, at a 



strategy meeting Wednesday, 
approved the concept of a national 
strike, he said. 

The mine workers' strike, which 
began Aug. 9. is a legal walkout, but 
under South African labor law, com- 
panies may fire workers if they do 
not show up for work. 

The union says 340,000 men arc 
on strike at 44 coal and gold mines, 
while the Chamber of Mines says 
210,000 miners are striking at 29 
mines. 



pf TTf Associated Pfss 

TOPEKA — Insurance Commis- 
sion Fletcher Bell announced Thurs- 
day that five Johnson County title 
insurance agencies have agreed to 
halt certain business arrangments 



and trade practices in Kansas without 
admitting or denying his allegations 
that they were violating state law. 
He identified them as Trusted Title 
Inc. and Commercial Title Insurance 
Co. Inc., both of Overland Park, and 
Meycrdirk Title Co., Land Title 



Corp. and Security Title Co. Inc., all 
of Ola the. 

Bell said the firms agreed to con- 
sent orders which found they had 
violated the Kansas Unfair Trade 
Practices Act for allegedly subcon- 
tracting tide work at reduced rates. 



The commission said these five 
orders are the first issued under a 
1983 law which gave his office regu- 
latory authority over the title insur- 
ance companies. 



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KANSAS STATI COLLSOIAW, Friday, 



2S.1M7 



FAA attempts discipline 



By Tfw AnocrQttKt Pris 

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — The Fed- 
eral Aviation Administration called 
Thursday for a "hard look" at ways to 
improve cockpit discipline in the 
wake of a rash of flight crew mis- 
takes and evidence that pilot errors 
caused a crash that killed 1 56 people 
in Detroit. 

FAA Administrator Allan McAr- 
tor told a gathering of 250 chief pilots 
from most of the nation's airlines the 
industry must "recapture the public's 
confidence" in aviation safety by bet- 
ter pilot training and an ins i stance for 
cockpit professionalism. 

But some of the pilots suggested 
the FAA itself had failed to provide 
adequate funds and leadership in 
addressing management problems 
faced in commercial cockpits today, 
citing past training programs that 
failed to gain adequate federal 
funding. 

"We've got to redcdicaic 
ourselves to professionalism in this 
industry," McArtor told the pilots 
and suggested if the industry does not 
make the improvements "our non- 
aviation professionals will." 

Elaborating on the remark at a 
news conference, McArtor said he 



Crews make errors 



was concerned that Congress might 
seek legislative solutions to safety 
problems should public confidence 
in aviation safety continue to wane. 

The FAA chief heard from more 
than a dozen pilots at the meeting, but 
acknowledged after the session that 
many of the participants probably 
were not as candid in their assess- 
ments during the public forum as 
they would have been in private 
meetings. 

Most of the chief pilots briefly 
reviewed their airlines' commitment 
to improved training programs. 

Don Nelson, vice president for 
flight operations at Northwest Air- 
lines, whose plane crashed in Detroit 
on Aug. 16, suggested another meet- 
ing in "a roll-up-your- sleeves atmo- 
sphere" without television cameras. 
He said it would be "inapproriate" to 
discuss pilot training at length in 
light of the accident. 

McArtor told the pilots that he saw 
"a genuine cause for concern" about 
the performance of both commercial 
and private pilots. He cited a sharp 
increase in the number of incidents, 
for example, in which pilots are fail- 



ing to follow air traffic control 
directions. 

The number of such so-called pilot 
deviations soared from 377 during 
the first quarter of 1 985 to 763 during 
the first three months of this year. 

McArtor said "new energy and 
new focus" must be given to assuring 
that pilots conduct themselves pro- 
fessionally. "You can't provide reg- 
ulations to force professionalism," 
he said. 

While the focus of the meeting 
was to develop better safeguards 
against pilot mistakes, some of the 
participants criticized the FAA for 
failing to move promptly enough on 
a broad range of aviation matters. 

Henry Duffy, president of the Air 
Line Pilots Association, criticized 
the federal government for not pro- 
viding money to develop better pilot 
training programs. He urged McAr- 
tor "to march into Congress and the 
Transportation Department" for 
additional funding. 

The session, which was called by 
the FAA, comes less than two weeks 
after the crash near Detroit of North- 
west Airlines Flight 255 during a 




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At 12:01 a.m. on ■ Sunday morning in October 19*6, s earners ihuuer was 
clicked What happened during the new 192 hoars «u called AWAKS (A Week 
U Kansas Stale). 

Former Kansas State University photographers were given the opponunsy 10 
return to campus to make pictures of coHefe lift in the 'Ms as n esisted for one 
week during October. 

Kansas Stale has numerous alumni photogrspnenv in positions of prominence 
throughout the country. Some » alumni and nearly IS current sutler* 
photographers made up the AWAKS shootin* team The result of exposing 1 .900 
rolls of black-and-white and color film with more than 68,000 exposures is a 
10-by- 14-inch coffee-table book to be published in September 1987. You can 
relive the experience of attending college in the 1980s at the nation s first 
lind-grand institution through the pages of this special edition 



Sec ordering information below 




. , A Week .AT 

J^ANSAS STATE 



Please send me copies of A Week At 

Kansas State at $25.00 each, plus $2.50 shipping 
and handling. Kansas residents must add $1.51 
for sales tax ($29.01 for Kansas residents, 
including shipping; $27.50, including shipping 
for non-residents) Make checks payable to: 
Student Publications Inc., AWAKS Book 
Orders, Kedzie Hal) 103, Kansas State Univer- 
sity, Manhattan, KS 66506. For more informa- 
tion, please write or call (913) 532-6555 between 
8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. 

© Student Publications Inc., 1987 
ISBN Number is G-943I0I-O0-X. 

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takeoff. 

Evidence from that accident is 
pointing increasingly toward an 
apparent failure by the veteran 
Northwest pilots to set (he wing flaps 
for takeoff, keeping the jetliner from 
gaining adequate lift. 

The Detroit crash and several 
other incidents this summer that 
resulted in near air tragedies have put 
renewed focus on pilot performance, 
prompting the FAA to call Thurs- 
day's meeting. 

FAA officials as well as the indus- 
try expressed doubt, however, that 
the session is likely to result in any 
immediate changes in pilot training 
or operating procedures. 

"The most I would expect is crea- 
tion of an industry wide group to take 
a closer look at the issue," said one 
official, who spoke on the condition 
that he not be identified by name. 

Even before the meeting began, 
however, the pilots union said there 
was widespread agreement between 
the industry and the FAA three years 
ago for a $9.4 million, three-year 
program aimed at looking for ways to 
solve human problems in the cockpit. 

That program was laid out after a 
series of workshops conducted by the 
FAA on so-called "human factors'.' 



Rights violation 
disturbs North 



By The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON - - Lt. Col. 
Oliver North pointed out to Attor- 
ney General Edwin Meese last fall 
that Meese had not read him his 
rights against self-incrimination 
before North acknowledged the 
diversion of Iran arms profits to 
the Contras, according to testi- 
mony released Thursday. 

Marine Lt, Col, Robert L. Earl, 
who worked as North's aide on 
the White House national security 
staff, also said North had told him 
of asking Meese for a delay of 24 
to 48 hours in Meese's initial 
investigation last November. 

Meanwhile on Thursday, Pen- 
tagon sources and friends of Rear 
Adm. John Poindexter, who was 
North's boss until North was fired 
and Poindexter was reassigned 
last November, said Poindexter is 
retiring from the Navy this fall 
after nearly 30 years service. 

Retired Adm, Clarence A. 
"Mark" Hill Jr., trustee of Poin- 
dexter's defense fund, said Poin- 
dexter "is very concerned about 



the image of the U.S. Navy" and 
wanted to leave before any indict- 
ments, which Hill said he 
expected. 

During the public lran-Contra 
hearings, Poindexter, who was 
President Reagan's national sec- 
urity adviser, testified he kept 
Reagan in the dark about the 
diversion of profits from the Iran 
arms sales to the Nicaraguan Con- 
tras — an operation mainly 
directed by North. 

Earl, in his testimony, said that 
in North's interview with Meese 
on Sunday, Nov. 23, North was 
confronted with evidence of the 
diversion. North, according to 
Earl, related that he asked the 
attorney general, "Since you 
didn't warn me of my rights ... 
does this count?" 

Earl also described helping 
North destroy documents crucial 
to the lran-Contra affair and help- 
ing secretary Fawn Hall conceal 
other documents in her clothing to 
sneak them out of the White 
House. 



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KANSASSTATI COLUOIAN, Friday, Augu»t 28, 1M7 



11 



Racing committee 
meets with panel 



By The Assocloted Press 

TOPEKA. Kan. — The Kansas 
Racing Commission look care of 
some personnel mailers Thursday 
during iu second meeting. 

The five-member panel, 
appointed by Gov. Mike Hayden 
two weeks ago, selected its attor- 
ney, a former assistant attorney 
general now practicing law in 
Topeka. It also took a step toward 
hiring its chief enforcement 
officer. 

The commission also conferred 
with Attorney General Robert T. 
Stcphan and David Johnson, 
director of the Kansas Bureau of 
Investigation, about enforcement 
of regulations it will enact and 
security measures. 

The commission accepted Stc- 



phan 's recommendation that it 
hire Janet Chubb, a Topeka attor- 
ney. Mrs, Chubb served in Ste- 
phan's office in 1979-81 as an 
assistant attorney general, and she 
had a private practice before and 
after she was on the attorney gen- 
eral's staff. She also served as a 
research attorney for the Kansas 
Supreme Court and Court of 
Appeals. 

Mrs. Chubb will join Stcphan' s 
staff as an assitant attorney gener- 
al again because under the law, 
the commission's attorney must 
be on the attorney general's staff. 
Her salary was set at $35,000. 

The commission also agreed to 
begin the process of selecting a 
director of enforcement, setting 
an Oct. 1 deadline for applications 
for the position. 



Hayden 

■ CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 

$32.03. Truck registration fees 
would increase by 25 percent, each 
being proportional to the axle weight 
of the vehicle. 

Should the proposal be passed by 
the state legislature, Hayden projects 
that construction work could begin in 
early 1988. 

"Our plan calls for.. .construction 
to begin next spring as soon as 
weather would allow, and we would 
have construction (sites) alt over the 
state," he said. 

The task force extends the starting 
of construction projects over seven 
years and plans for a total construc- 
tion time of 10 years. All work is 



scheduled to be done by Kansas con- 
tractors using Kansas laborers. 

"A quicker way is available, but it 
will be at a disadvantage to Kansas 
contractors and Kansas laborers," 
Hayden said. By contracting in large 
amounts, several out-of-state compa- 
nies could be contracted for less cost. 

Hayden indicated, however, that 
the option of out-of-state contractors 
was not part of his proposal. 

The governor has called a special 
session of the Kansas Legislature for 
Monday to give consideration to his 
$1.7 billion comprehensive highway 
package. 



Troop KCI 



■ CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 

Enrile and Ramos helped lead the 
civilian-military revolt that drove 
former President Ferdinand E. Mar- 
cos into exile after 20 years in power 
and installed Aquino, 

Aquino's government has weath- 
ered several coup attempts and con- 
spiracies since Marcos fled Feb. 26. 
1986. She said she would summon 
(he Cabinet for a special meeting Fri- 
day and cancel a planned trip to cen- 
tral Luzon. 



■ CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 

tani is still working on assessments 
for the remainder of his six-month 
contract. 

Unless Patch reports the floor pro- 
ducts are not fulfilling the needs of 
the agency, there will be no exemp- 
tions granted from purchasing the 
products, he said. 



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Co mmission 
Church 

Statement of Faith: 



We believe the Bible to be the 

Inspired, the only Infallible, 
authoritative Word of God. 

We believe there Is one 
almighty, perfect and triune 
God: Father. Son. and Holy 
Spirit, eternally coexistent 
personalities of the same 
essence. 

We believe In the deity of our 
Lord Jesus Christ. In 1 Us virgin 
birth, tils sinless life. Ills 
substitutionary death. His 
bodily resurrection, His 
ascension to the right hand of 
the Father and His personal 
return In power and glory. 
We believe In the personality of 
the Holy Spirit, and in His 
ministry of convicting and 
regenerating sinful men. and 
Indwelling, sealing and 
empowering believers. 



We believe In the fall of man 
from the state of Innocence in 
which he was created to one of 
total depravity in which he Is 
devoid of spiritual life, and 
Incapable, apart from divine 
power, of pleasing God, 
We believe la the Justification 
of the sinner by grace through 
faith alone. 

We believe that the church 
universal Is composed of all 
true believers and that Its 
members should assemble 
themselves together In local 
churches for worship, prayer, 
fellowship and teaching with a 
view to being equipped to fulfill 
the Great Commission. 
We believe In the bodily 
resurrection of the saved to 
Immortality, and in the 
conscious eternal suffering of 
the lost. 



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KANSAS STAT* COOSOIAN, FrMty, Augurt 2$ t 1M7 



Legislators back 'comprehensive 9 plan 



By Th» Asfoekitod Press 

TOPEKA — Nine House mem- 
bers, including several of the cham- 
ber's top leaders, participated in a 
show of support Thursday for a 
"comprehensive" highway program, 
one simitar in size to one proposed by 
Gov. Mike Hayden. 

Although they did not endorse a 
specific plan, the six Republicans 
and three Democrats said they sup- 
ported a large plan that has a "major 
committment of funds" and relies 
heavily on motor fuels tax and vehi- 
cle registration fee increases to 
finance il 

House Majority Leader Joe 
Knopp, R- Manhattan, led a noon 
conference, which also was attended 



by Speaker Pro Tern David Heine- 
mann. R -Garden City, and Rep. Bill 
Bunten, R-Topeka, chairman of the 
Appropriations Committee. 

Also participating were Reps. 
Rochelle Chronister, R-Neodesha; 
Sandy Duncan, R- Wichita; Henry 
Helgcrson, D-Wichita; Mike 
O'Neal, R-Hutchinson; Jim Russell. 
D-Coffeyville, and Jack Shriver, D- 
Arkansas City. 

"We're trying to serve as a rallying 
point for people who want to see a 
comprehensive plan passed," Knopp 
said. "I'm certain that among the nine 
of us there are difference dollar 
figures." 

A special session of the Legisla- 
ture, which Hayden has called to 
have lawmakers consider his plan. 



begins Monday. His proposal calls 
for spending $1.71 billion over the 
next nine years to build more than 
1,319 miles of new roads, mostly 
along existing highway corridors. 

The state Department of Transpor- 
tation would spend $5.58 billion for 
the new construction, maintenance 
of existing roads, major modifica- 
tions of existing highways and the 
agency's normal, daily operations. 

The state's gasoline anddiescl fuel 
taxes would increase by five cents a 
gallon and vehicle registration fees 
by between 50 percent, for trucks, 
and 100 percent, for passenger cars. 
The state would issue neary SI .3 bil- 
lion in bonds, and the fees and taxes 
would be indexed, or adjusted annu- 
ally for inflation. 



Some Farm Credit System banks 
continue loss of financial status 



By Ths Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — Some Farm 
Credit System banks arc still losing 
ground despite efforts 10 buttress 
their financial status, in part because 
of excess overhead, their chief regu- 
lator said Thursday. 

Overhead for the financially 
troubled system of 37 banks and 387 
associations, all owned cooperative- 
ly, is running at $800 million a year, 
Farm Credit Administration Chair- 
man Frank Naylor told a group of 
farm writers. 

"We simply can 't have that kind of 
overhead," said Naylor, whose agen- 
cy regulates the $55 billion network 
of institutions which despite huge 
losses in recent years remains the 
nation's largest farm lender. 

He gave as an example an institu- 
tion that maintains offices in every 
county within its district and because 
of the amount of money it must cam 
to maintain itself cannot afford to 
make loans smaller man $43,000. 

"And that's just bricks, mortar and 
staff," Naylor said. "It doesn't cover 
bad loans" and assorted other costs. 
He refused to name the bank or any 



other specific institutions within the 
system that he said were in trouble. 
Legislation approved by the 
House Agriculture Committee recen- 
tly would restructure the system and 
could cut down on overhead. 



"The question is not 
whether you're going to 
maintain the viability of 
the system but what 
you're going to do to 
maintain the viability of 
the system." 

—Frank Naylor 

Naylor said his agency has taken 
no stand on the bill and will not. "We 
will continue to be an arm's length 
regulator," he said. 

He expressed confidence that 
Congress would send a bill to the 
president's desk this year. The admi- 
nistration has already made a com- 
mitment to save die system, he said. 

"The question is not whether 
you're going to maintain the viability 
of the system but what you're going 
to do to maintain the viability of the 



system," he said. 

Naylor said any bill should pro- 
vide strong regulatory authority to 
force institutions within the system 
to engage in sound business 
practices. 

Some institutions that have been 
aggressive about contacting borrow- 
ers who are behind have succeeded in 
collecting 80 percent of the interest 
due while others have been reluctant 
to get in touch with borrowers, he 
said. 

He said the average collection of 
overdue interest in the system is 1 1 
percent. 

The price tag on a rescue effort for 
the system remains unclear, he said. 



Research 
saves lives. 



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American Heart 

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WET* FIGHTING FOR 
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The nine lawmakers said they 
think Hayden's proposal should be 
the starting point for any comprehen- 
sive plan. Shriver maintained a plan 
must be nearly the same size to pass 
the Legislature. 

"I don't see how you can start 
dropping projects and expect some- 
thing to pass," Shriver said. "Ninety 
percent of the people in Kansas want 
a highway program, and 10 percent 
want to pay for it." 

Some group members expressed 
general support for indexing and 
bond financing, two concepts the 
House and Senate transportation 
committees rejected when they put 
together alternative highway plans 
this week. 

The committees had unanimously 



rejected indexing, which they 
likened to an automatic tax increase 
without legislative review. However, 
Chronister said indexing would help 
KDOT keep up with inflation in 
building projects. 

"Stranger things have happened," 
Chronister said, when asked whether 
she though her collcgues would 
accept indexing. 

Several members of the group also 
sharply criticized the House Trans- 
portation Committee's plan, which 
would allow voters to decide in the 
August 1988 primary election 
whether to increase the state's 4 per- 
cent sales (ax a half-percent to 
finance major highway construction. 
The plan also would increase the 
state's motor fuels taxes three cents a 



gallon, truck registration fees by 25 
percent and passenger car fees by 
S32. A program for maintenance 
would be kept separate from one for 
new construction. 

Chronister called such a separa- 
tion a "poor concept." Shriver said he 
doubted a proposed amendment 
could find the two-thirds majority it 
would need to pass the House. 

"I discount it as not an option at 
all." Shriver said. 

The League of Kansas Muncipali- 
ties also has adopted a policy state- 
ment in support of a "major and com- 
prehensive" program. 

In a policy statement released 
Thursday, the league said it would 
support a motor fuels tax increase of 
four or five cents. 



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Applications due 
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FACULTY AND STAFF MEMBERS: 

Don't be left out of the 1987-1988 
K-State Campus Directory. 



Be sure to get your 1987-1988 K-State Campus Directory listing 
updated. Personnel Services provides the faculty /staff list for the 
directory and if individuals have not updated their records, the 
directory entry is inaccurate. We would like your assistance in 
updating the faculty/ staff listings. 

The following information is needed for individual listings: name, 
home address, campus address, home phone, campus phone, faculty/ 
staff title, and office/department/division. 

Please takes few minutes to check last year's directory. If anything 
has changed, form PER 39 must be completed and submitted to 
Personnel Services by TODAY. TODAY is also the deadline to 
submit individual "Personnel Appointment" forms (PER 39) for 
unclassified and classified individuals and CST forms tor graduate 
student employees. 

Anyone wishing to withhold his or her name from the directory 
must submit a letter to Personnel Services by TODAY. 



If you have questions, please contact Sheila in Personnel 
Services, Employee Benefits and Records, 532-6Z77. 




Sports 

Kansas State Collegian ■ Friday, August 28, 1987 ■ Page 13 



Wildcat defenders strong as ever 



By JEFF RAPP 
Sports Editor 



Anyone who saw it, heard about it 
or read about it, must know K- State's 
1986 football season was nothing to 
cheer about. 

A dismal 2-9 record, paired with 
agonizing losses to Northern Iowa 
and Missouri, was enough to cut 
game attendance from almost 28,000 
at the Kansas game to barely over 
13,000 for the bleak season finale 
against Colorado. 

Through all the dampening of the 
crying towels last season, however, 
there were a few bright spots. One of 
those spots was the defensive 
backficld. 

That unit lied a school record with 
20 interceptions, while the defense as 
a whole led the Big Eight Conference 
in fumble recoveries and intercep- 
tions with 39. 

Good things started happening 
during the first game of the season 
when the Wildcat defensive unit 
intercepted six passes in the seasoner 
opener against Western Illinois. 

Then a sophomore, defensive back 
Robert Easterwood collected three of 
the six thefts. Easterwood will be 
back this season, along with sopho- 
mores Erick Harper and Marcus 
Miller. Also returning will be senior 
Willie Haliburton, who relumed an 
interception 42 yards in the initial 
contest to set up a K- Slate 
touchdown. 

K-State head coach Stan Parrish 
had fond memories of last year's 
opener and hopes for this season. 

"We'll take some 'dejavu' if we 
can get it. We'll lake three more 
(interceptions from Easterwood),*' 
Pamsh said. 

Last season, the defensive back- 
ficld was nicknamed the "Kiddie 
Corps." because the oldest member 
was Halliburton, who was then a 
junior. 

This year, K- State head coach 
Stan Parrish doesn't expect a "sopho- 
mor§ jinx" for the corps. Rather, he 
looks for improvement. 

"I expect them all to be better," 
Parrish said. 

"We're about two deep in every 
position (in the defensive backficld) 
and I think because we are deep back 
there and we have such good compet- 
ition, the motivation is with the kids. 
I don't think we'll sec any sopho- 
more slumps," he said. 

Actually, the only sophomores arc 
Harper, Miller and Tyreesc Herds. 
Parrish said they've all improved. 




Fans love a streak 



By The Associated Press 

WICHITA — A minor-league 
baseball player who leaped from 
obscurity to national fame by hit- 
ting safely in 69 straight games 
has been largely forgotten in the 
dusty annals of sports history. 

Joseph Wilhoit, an outfielder 
for the Wichita Witches, ignited 
baseball fever in this southeast 
Kansas town in 1919 when he 
broke the record of 45 games held 
by another minor-leaguer. 

Joe DiMaggio's major- league 
record of getting a hit in 56 conse- 
cutive games has stood since 
1941. The latest assault on the 
record, by Paul Molitor of the 
Milwaukee Brewers, ended Wed- 
nesday night at 39 games. 

Molitor's streak, which cap- 
tured the nation's attention, was 
the best since 1978, when Pete 
Rose had a 44-game streak. 

Wilhoit, too, had his moment in 
the sun, coming after an undistin- 
guished stint in the major leagues 
(hat included an appearance in 
two World Scries games. 



Let go by the Boston Braves, 
Pittsburgh Pirates and New York 
Giants after spending parts of 
only three seasons with the teams, 
Wilhoit signed on with the Witch- 
es, a Western League team, in 
1919. 

No one took much notice of 
him until July 27 of that year, 
when he hit safely in his 46th 
straight game, breaking the record 
held by Jack Ness. 

Jubilant fans watching the 
game passed a hat and collected 
$600 for their new star, a consid- 
erable sum at that time. 

A local newspaper, the Wichita 
Eagle, reported: "The old town 
has basebal litis to the thirty-third 
degree, with a temperature that is 
chasing the mercury out of the top 
of the tube." 

"The morning greeting here has 
changed from 'How do you do" to 
'Did Wilhoit hit?,"* the newspap- 
er said. 

On Aug. 20, 1919, Wilhoit's 
streak finally ended, as he was hit- 
less in three at-bats. 



McRae refuses offer 



Surff/Brad I -'it shier 

Defensive back Robert Easterwood goes through pass coverage drills Thursday. Easterwood, along with Erick 
Harper, Marcus Miller and Willie Haliburton, should again be bright spots on the Wildcat squad. 



t-% ^l \t\ O ~! HUH 

"They're more experienced. 
They're bigger, stronger and they're 
highly motivated kids," Parrish said. 

Parrish said with all the talent in 
the backficld, he'll be able to give 
playing time to a bevy of athletes. 

"I don't know if we can name our 
starters. We've got about eight or 
nine defensive backs that we think 
can really play, We also think it's 
important to roll them in and out of 
there to keep their legs fresh," Parrish 
said. 



From Harper's piont of view, not 
only the defensive backs will be bet- 
ter this season, but the entire season 
wilt be a raging success. 

"It wilt be better, because wc (the 
defensive backs) are more exper- 
ienced. We're also working together 
as a team, not just individuals. 1 
believe it will be a lot better than it 
was last year," Harper said. 

Harper said after the preseason 
games on the 'Cats schedule this 



year, the team will really be prepared 
for the Big Eight season. The sopho- 
more strong safety's predictions may 
seem overly optimistic. 

When asked how many confer- 
ence games K -State would win this 
season, Harper replied, "All of 
ihem." 

NOTES:One day after a shor- 
tened practice because of injuries and 
bad weather, Parrish described 
Thursday's practice as "a full one." 



By The Associated Press 

KANSAS CITY, Mo. - ■ Hal 
McRae says he does not expect any 
criticism for turning down an oppor- 
tunity to become baseball's next 
black manager. 

"I don't expect any and if I do get 
it, I don't care," McRae said Thurs- 
day after rejecting an offer to manage 
the Kansas City Royals. 

"My family comes first. My job is 
to be a provider in the best way thai I 
can." 

McRae was offered the Royals job 
Wednesday night after Manager Bil- 
ly Gardner was fired. John Waihan, 
who is white, was named manager 
after McRae turned down the job. 

Baseball has been under fire from 
blacks for not having many blacks in 
management positions. Former Los 
Angeles Dodgers executive Al Cam- 
panis touched off the controversy 
when he suggested on ABC -TV's 
"Nighdine" program that blacks 
might lack some of the necessities for 
management, 

"I'm not a pioneer, I'm not a cru- 
sader," McRae said. "I'm just Irying 
to do my job." 



K.C. fires Gardner 



By The Associoted Press 

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — The Kan- 
sas City Royals fired Manager Billy 
Gardner Thursday and replaced him 
with long-time Royals' player John 
Wathan. 

Wathan, who was in his first year 
as manager of the Royals Class AAA 
team at Omaha, was given the job 
after it was turned down by Hal 
McRae, the team's batting instructor 
and former designated hitter, said 
General Manager John Schucrholz. 

McRae has said previously that he 
wants to spend more lime with his 
family. He said Thursday he wasn't 
sure if he could commit himself to 
managing. 

The offer to McRae, who is black, 
followed owner Ewing Kauffman's 
announcement in the spring that the 
Royals would develop a plan to move 
minorities into management posi- 
tions with ihe club. 

Kauffman's statement followed a 
remark on national television by A I 
Campanis of the Los Angeles Dod- 
gers that blacks might lack some of 
the necessities for management. Thai 
remark cost Campanis his job and 
called attention to the lack of blacks 
in front office and management posi- 
tions throughout baseball. 

The Royals were 62-64 going into 
Thursday's game with the Texas 
Rangers and trailed the Minnesota 
Twins by 3 1-2 games in the Ameri- 
can League West. 

"It is our belief this club still has an 
opportunity to win the pennant with 
ihe talent and commitment that it 
has," Schucrholz said. "We believe 
this club has ihe necessary talent to 
put a pennant drive on. 

"Wc feel thai wiih John Wathan 's 
knowledge of the organization and 
especially his knowledge ol the peo- 
ple on this team and more especially 
his feci for whai the Royals organiza- 



tion means that he is the man most 
qualified to get the season on track, 
albeit with a short time remaining." 

Schucrholz said that Wathan 
would manage the Royals for the rest 
of the season and that a decision 
about who would manage the club in 
1988 would be made later. 

"We've played poorly at times this 
season, we've played great at times," 
Wathan said. "My job is to get that 
consistency back." 

"It Is our belief this club still 
has an opportunity to win 
the pennant with the 
talent and commitment 
that it has. We believe this 
club has the necessary 
talent to put a pennant 
drive on." 

—John Schuerholz 

Wathan has been in the Royals 
organization for 17 yean as a player, 
coach and manager. He was a catch- 
er, first baseman and outfielder in 10 
big league seasons with Kansas City. 

"Even though 1 have limited 
experience as a manager, I think the 
way I played the game and the way I 
studied the game is in my favor," said 
Wathan, who has guided Omaha to a 
62-70 record. "This is what I've 
always wanted. I've been in the Roy- 
als organization for 17 seasons and 
that is not something that not many 
ballplayers can say." 

Wathan said he did not plan any 
major changes on the team. 

"I think we'll get back to the old 
style of running, a little bit more hit- 
and-run instead of just waiting for 
something to happen, he said." 

Wathan said he didn't think he 
would have a problem managing 
players that he had played with for 
many years. He said he planned to 



meet with key players and explain 
that he expected a "business-like 
atmosphere." 

Wathan played on each of Royals 
championship teams, including the 

1985 World Series winner. 

He was a coach for the Royals in 

1986 before moving to Omaha. 
Wathan, the Royals regular catch- 
er from 1 98 1 -8 3 and has a career ,262 
balling average. He hit .300 or belier 
three limes, including .328 in 1977. 

Wathan set a major league record 
for catchers in 1982 when he stole 36 
bases. 

"I regard this as a golden oppor- 
tunity," Waihan said. "I have confi- 
dence in my ability that I will be back 
to manage next year." 

Schuerholz refused 10 say specifi- 
cally why Gardner was fired. 

"We fell we needed to make a 
change at this time, being in the race 
as wc are and still have a chance to 
win," Schueiholz said. "Wc felt if we 
waited any longer it would have been 
too late for anyone to turn it around. 

"Sometimes when teams don't 
play like you think they should, a 
leadership change is one way to 
remedy that" 

Gardner look over the Royals 
when Manager Dick Howscr res- 
igned Feb. 23 because of a brain 
tumor. Gardner had been hired in the 
offseason as third base coach with 
the expectation that he would man- 
age if Howser was too weak to 
handle the job. 

Gardner's only other big league 
job was with the Minnesota Twins, 
where he was 268-353 before he was 
fired June 20, 1985. 

Gardner managed Waihan for five 
seasons at Kansas Ciiy minor league 
clubs in Jacksonville. Fla., and 
Omaha. 

"I feet bad getting ihe job this 
way," Waihan said. "Billy was like a 
father to me in the minor leagues." 




Collejim/Jeff Sled 



Hard to hold 

(him llungukv senior in apparel design, bobbles the ball during 
Alpha Gamma Delta's Hag football practice Thursday. 



McRae said the job was offered to 
him by Schuerholz in an hour-long 
meeting Wednesday. 

McRae retired as a player this year 
and has served as hilling coach. He 
has often said this year that he wants 
to spend more time with his family. 

"Sometimes a guy wants to man- 
age just for the sake of managing." 
McRae said. "Sometimes, he wants 
to manage to get himself a belter pos- 
ition with another team. That's not 
my way. I just want a good situation. 
1 don't want to manage just for the 
sake of managing." 

McRae said he wasn't sure if he 
could commit himself fully to the 
-job. ■*—•—— — - 

"I know it's a tough job and you 
have to make a strong commitment," 
he said. "I didn't want to have to be in 
the position of having to protect 
myself, of always trying to save my 
job. 

'To me, the most important people 
are players. I wanted to be able to cre- 
ate an environment where the players 
could work and get their jobs done 
and not always be worrying about 
wins and losses." 

Big Eight 
is beaten 
by China 

By Staff and Wire Reports 

Despite a 19-point, Il-rebound 
performance from K-State's Charles 
Bledsoe, the Big Eight Conference 
Select basketball team dropped a 
heartbreaking 74-72 decision this 
morning to the China National Team 
in the semifinals of the Beijing Inter- 
national Tournament. 

Played before a capacity crowd of 
18,000, the Big Eight Select team ral- 
lied from a 45-37 halftime deficit to 
grab a five-point advantage at one 
stage in the second half. 

However, the China National 
Team connected on some timely 
baskets down the stretch to earn the 
victory. 

China will now advance to tomor- 
row's championship contest against 
the Soviet Union. 

Bledsoe topped the Big Eight 
Select team in scoring for the second 
straight contest He hit on nine of 10 
field goals while sinking his only free 
throw attempt for his 19 points. 

In the previous contest against the 
Liaoning Province of China, Bledsoe 
scored 25 points on 12 of 1 3 shooting 
from the field, but in a winning 
effort. 

Following Bledsoe in the China 
game in double figure scoring was 
Colorado's Scott WiUce with 14 
points and K-State's Steve Henson 
with 12 points. 

With a 3-2 toumey record, the 
Select team will now meet Czecho- 
slovakia foir third place at 3:30 a.m. 
(CUT) tomorrow to complete play in 
the tournament. 

The Big Eight Select team opened 
its tournament action last week with 
a 74-69 victory over the Czechs. 



14 



KAW»A> tTATl COLUOUH, M—y, 



2i, 1M7 



Children win case 

Insurance firm must pay 



Kedne 103 



ClassAds 



U2-eHS 



By The Associated Prais 

TOPEKA — A federal court jury 
found aficr only VA hours of deliber- 
ation Thursday that a Boston-based 
insurance company must pay the 
children of the late Martin K. Ander- 
son under an insurance policy he 
bought six months before he was 
murdered in November 1983. 

The jury of five men and three 
women held thai Loma Anderson 
Eldridge, his wife at the time he was 
killed who has been charged with 
first-degree murder in the case, did 
not procure the policy on her hus- 
band's life, so the policy could not 
have been obtained by fraud as New 
England Mutual Life Insurance Co. 
claimed in suing to avoid payment 

In Hutchinson, Loren Slater, the 
grandfather of the four Anderson 
girls who will share in proceeds of 
the policy, unless the jury's verdict is 
overturned on appeal said, "We're 
just very happy for the children. They 
deserve it. 

"I think the jury did what was 
right. The children are the real vic- 
tims of this whole tragic event. We're 
very pleased for them." 

The girls, ranging in age from 6 to 
13, were in court briefly Monday 
before jury selection but did not 
return. They are Lori, Julia, Janelle 
and Jenifer. 

Their mother, who is serving time 
in Kansas Correctional Institution at 
Lansing after pleading guilty to crim- 
inal solicitation to commit murder 
two years ago, original iy filed a 
claim for the insurance proceeds for 
herself. But last November, she 
waived her claim to the money and 
asked that it be paid to the four girls. 

Terrance Crebs of St Louis, the 
attorney for New England Mutual, 
said he felt "fairly certain" that 
motions needed to farm the basis of 
an appeal would be filed. The plain- 
tiffs have 10 days to file those 
motions, and the defense attorney, 
Edward Hund of Wichita, has 10 
days to respond. 

Judge Dale Saffels, who presided 
over the trial, said he then would rule 



on the motions without having a 
hearing on them. He said it is routine 
in cases such as this for the losing 
party to file motions for a new trial 
and for a directed verdict for its side, 
regardless of the jury's verdict 

The case went to the jury of five 
men and three women after attorneys 
for the two sides delivered their clos- 
ing arguments and Saffels issued his 
instructions to the jury shortly after 3 
p.m. Thursday. 

At issue was whether a $270,000 
insurance policy on Anderson's life 
— taken out about six months before 
his death in November 1983 — was 
valid, or whether it was obtained 
through fraud and deceit by his wife, 
Loma Anderson, who had remarried 
and is now named Eldridge. 



"I think the Jury did what 
was right. The children are 
the real victims of this 
whole tragic event. We're 
very pleased for them." 
—loren Slater 



There was testimony during the 
trial that $2 10,000 of the policy was 
on Anderson's life, with an addition- 
al $60,000 to be paid if he died acci- 
dentally. It apparently will become a 
matter of negotiation on just how 
much of the policy will be paid. 

New England Mutual contended 
that under a legal definition of pro- 
curement she "procured" the policy 
by harassing Martin Anderson into 
taking it out, after a previous policy 
lapsed for lack of premium 
payments. 

She was plotting his murder at the 
time the policy was applied for and 
issued, thus committing fraud and 
deceit which should have invalidated 
the policy, Crebs argued in closing 
arguments. 

Anderson, who was shot to death 
at night in an isolated field south of 
Manhattan by a person wearing a ski 
mask, took out the policy basically 
on his own to provide financial sec- 
urity for his family, and paid all the 



premiums on it, making it a valid 
contract countered Hund in his clos- 
ing remarks for the defense. 

It was up to the jury to decide if 
Loma Anderson coerced her hus- 
band into getting the insurance poli- 
cy while she conspired to have him 
murdered so she could collect the 
insurance proceeds, or whether he 
bought it on his own without signific- 
ant influence from her. 

Final witness in the four-day trial 
was Esther Aldrete of Dodge City, 
who formerly lived in Emporia and 
worked as a babysitter for the 
Andersons. 

She testified that she heard the 
Andersons argue over insurance, 
with Loma urging Martin to get more 
insurance after his policy lapsed for 
lack of payment in January 1983, and 
with Anderson putting it off for a 
time because of the family's finan- 
cial problems. 

Aldrete said she once heard Loma 
Anderson tell somebody she was 
talking to on the telephone: "I cannot 
wait for Marty to die so I can start 
counting the green stuff." 

Saffels instructed the jury that if it 
believed Loma Eldridge influenced 
Anderson in applying for the insur- 
ance policy with the intent of killing 
him or having him killed to collect 
the benefits, then it should find in 
favor of the insurance company. 

However, the judge also told the 
jury, if it believed Anderson pur- 
chased the insurance policy of his 
own free will and intended it for the 
benefit of his wife and four daught- 
ers, then it should find for them and 
make the company pay. 

The jury took the second choice by 
answering no to a question posed by 
the judge on the verdict form which 
asked, "Do you find that it was Loma 
Anderson Eldridge who procured the 
policy of insurance on Martin K. 
Anderson's life ... from the plaintiff 
New England Mutual Life Insurance 
Co.?" 

Eldridge married Lorna Anderson 
on June 29. 1985. 1914 months after 
Martin K. Anderson was killed in a 
field south of Manhattan. 



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Deadline i* noon me day Delore publication 
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Student Puol leal ion J until no I be respond bl a 
for more man one wrong c lassi'ied insertion his the 
advertiser's responsibility lo contact the paper it an 
error exists No adiustmani wilt be made it tne error 
does not alter tne value ol the ed 

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FREE tor a pancd not eiceeding three rjaye They 
can be placed at Kedne 10] or by calling 532-6556 

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days ta 75 per tncti. Five consecutive days WSOpet 
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ANNOUNCEMENTS 



01 



MARY KAY Coemetici— Sum care— (jtamour prod 
ucls Free facial, call Flortt Taylor. 539-2070 Hand 
icepped accessible it 751 

FLYIHQ INTEREST you? For information on K Slate 
Flying Club call Hugh Irvrn 5324311 of 539-1128 
|1tt| 

WANTED - 100 overweight people to try new chgco 
late, vanilla and ilrswberry herbal weight control 
program No drugs no e«ercise Doctor approve a 
100* . guaranteed MasterCard and Via* accepted 
Call 776 -51 U or 775-1465 (130) 

J10-I360 WEEKLY'tJp Mailing Circulars' uto 
quotasJDosses information Rush self addressed 
envelope CMfNACDE POi-B 7730. floefctord. IL 
5H26 H 151 

PRIDETTE 
TRYOUTS 

Sat., Aug. 29 9 a.m. 

McCain 201 

Questions call 

Jo Byrnes 532-5296 

or leave message 

532-5150 

HOLLYWOOD S BEST Get your Cinemagic Video 
coupon books trom Joy 776 549* betore9p m n 
5> 

THE FQNE Crisis Center wilt be hotding volunteer 
training Aug 29 and 30 m union 213 Alt in te rested 
persons are encouraged to cell 532-6565 to regis 
let ii Si 

OPEN AIR food and craft lair in Aggievitle Oct 10 
Foe information on booths write Boa 1904 in Man 
hat tan by Sept 25 (2-191 

ASK ME about Mary Kay Cosmetics' Jane I MiHiken 
5399469 12-27] 

JOIN IN the fun at Ogdenj Fall Festival -Saturday 
Aug 29 Parade— Ham bed races— i p m tug 
ol-wftr— i Mo m .dinner — 4 p m street dance— 7 
pm Call 539 4327 tor informal ion (341 

IS) 



Come join our College Class in . . . 



Bible Study 



College Class: 9 a.m. on lower level 
Worship Service: 10 a.m. In Sanctuary 

College Heights Baptist Church 

2221 College Heights Rd. 
(off Anderson) 




GEOFF MOORE 

and the 
DISTANCE 

Sept. 3, 8 p.m. 
Westview 

Community Church 

Tickets: 
$6 Advance 
$7 At Door 

Tickets available at all Manhattan Christian bookstores 

More info: Mark Posson, 539-4844 

Sponsored By Manhattan Christian College 



Cn QsL «* « f 

LU&k 

PAfry 

a>C Jo FK IPM) 
ytn7 mi( CitT 




*u.,i.n 
i.v?M 

e4ith.av««**4 
l<ili-»* 

tar 



tqg 



Welcome 
Back 

Dance 

& Cookout 

at 

St. Isidore's 

Student Center 

Aug. 30th 
at 6 p.m. 

$1 Admission 
to dance 

Cookout Free 

Music by: 
Best Sound Around 

Sponsored by 
Newman 



Collegian Classified Advertising 

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103 to place your ad or call 532 6555 Student Publications now accepts MasterCard and Visa (Minimum charge of $5 ) 
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contact the paper if an error exists. No adjustment will be made if the error does not alter the value of the ad 

* Items found ON CAMPUS can be advertised FREE tor a period not exceeding three days They can be placed at Kedne 103 
or by calling 532 6555. 

' M mailed ads do not arrive by the Noon deadline, they will be placed in the next day's paper 

* Ads which are incorrectly calculated will be run only for amount paid 

* The Collegian reserves the right to edit or reject any advertisement at any time 

Classified Ad Rates Classified Categories 



Werda/Det 1 • J a • Extra Oaya 

i-« Ul 1.11 4.00 a. to 4.TB 1.00 

II 1.40 *.«■ 4.H 4.10 S.IO 1.01 

IT 2.11 J.tJ 4.J0 1.10 1.41 1.10 

IS ».M S.W 4.TI (.40 fcOO 1.11 

It 1.M 4.00 B.Oe 8.70 0.11 1.30 

to a.M 4.iB til t.oo t.oo i ii 

■1 1.11 4.41 S.50 I.M O.tt 1.30 

It 1.30 4.00 0.71 S.IO 7.10 I.M 

11 3.40 4.10 0.00 O.tO 7,S5 1.40 

M 1.00 •.« 0.11 7.10 7.00 1.« 

II 9.71 1.19 0.SO T.S0 Ml 1.J0 

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10 4.11 1.19 7.7S 1.00 10.00 1.7S 
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22 


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39 


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Religious Ji 
Directory $L 




American Baptist 
Campus Ministry 

Evening Gathering 
Sundays - 7 p.m. 

Baptist Campus Center 
1801 Anderson 539-3051 

•Study Sessions 
•Social issues resources 
•Personal consultations 
Campus Minister • Dave Stewart 




Christian Campus Ministry 

* MINISTRY tlf THE CHI HOI OF CHRIST 

• CVvummul* 

• Fdhiwship Meals 

• Draiita Troupe 

• Wcekh Bible Studies 

• Retreas A. Seminar* 

• Prayer & Share Time 

Worship lOJOa lit. & 6 p in. 

Bthte CatMCI ) M am 

& WeJ 7*1 pin. 

ANDY M1LLKR -Campus. Minieter 
UW DICKENS AVK 5.W-65W 




Sunday Praise Hours 
10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. 

• Sunday School — 9:30 a.m. 

• Collegiate Bible Class 

• Transpo ration available 

Office 537-7633 

Selh Childs Rd. at Gary Ave. 

Mike Wall, Pastor. 537-7967 



Evangelical 
Free Church 
of Manhattan 



" STGreatW 
Commission 

Church of Manhattan 

Campus Bible Study 
Sunday Worship 

10:30 a.m. Sundays 
at University Inn 



Trinity Presbyterian 
Church 

Church School 9:30 a.m. 
Worship 10:45 a.m. 

eNur&ary Provided 
eHandrcap Access iWe 
•Rides Available 

Pastor James Cramer 

1110 College Ave. 539-3921 



FIRST UNITED 
METHODIST CHURCH 

8:45 a.m. Communion 

(first Sunday ol the month) 

9:45 a.m. Church School 
8:45 & 11 a.m. Worship 

Nursery provided lor all services 

John 0. Stoneking, Pastor 

612Poyntz 776-8821 




former Luckey 
High School 
Juliette St. 
and Pierre 



Worship 9 a.m. 
Sunday School 10:15 a.m. 

Nursery provided 
776-0259 537-8526 



/ 



(m^^fywt- 



Lutheran Campus Ministry 

ULTiici. you . . . 

Worship II a.m. Study 9:45 a.m. 

Sundiyi Danforth Chapel (cimpui) 
I^uthcran Student Movement 5 p.m. 

Sunday - Lutheran Student Center 

Dan Fallon, Pastor 
1021 Dcnijon 1539-4451 




GRACE BAPTIST CHURCH 

Worship Hours 
8:30 and 11 a.m. 

Sunday School, Collegiate Class 

9:45 a.m. 

Or. Judd Swihart teacher 

For transportation, call 776-0424 

Horace Brelsford. Pastor 

776*0424 2901 Dickens Ave 



WIATVIEW COMMUNITY 
CHUDCB 



WORSHIP 8 and 10:30 am. 
College Class 9:30 a.m. 

Kcmdy'i ClAirn tide anmncc 

Sun. Eve, Wonhip 6 pm. 

hi, 3rd. and 5ih Sundays 

CARE CELLS (Smalt Groups) 

f> p.m. 2nd and 4th Sundays 

Oilier at 2607 Allison Ave. 

3001 PI. Riley Blvd. 537-7173 



FAITH BAPTIST CHURCH 

Independent, Fundamental 

2615 Allison Avenue 

Sunday School 10 a.m. 

Sunday Service 
11 a.m. & 7 p.m. 

Wednesday Service 7 p.m. 
For information, call .537-8963 



UNIVERSITY CHRISTIAN 

2800 Claflin 

8:30 & 11 a.m. Worship 
9:45 Sunday School 

(College Class Meets at Mr Steak) 

6:30 p.m. 
Sun. Eve. Service 

Handicapped Accessible 
776-5440 




MANHATTAN 

FREE METHODIST 

CHURCH 

9:45 a.m — Sunday School 

11 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. - Worship 

7 p.m. Wed. — 
Bible Study and Prayer 

1231 Poyntz 539-7706 



FUNT HILLS FUU FAITH Church 

Sunday Scnool 9:15-10 am 

Worship 10 15-Noon 

Home Group Bible Studies 

217 Selh Childs-Church Location 

(Bsmt ot Raoul i tM&nadoi 
809 Houston 537-0256 



COLLEGE AVENUE UNITED 
METHODIST CHURCH 

Sunday School — 9:30 a.m 

(Cfjneot age Das) 

Worship Service — 10:45 a.m. 

1609 College Ave 539-4191 



BLUE VALLEY MEMORIAL 
UNITED METHODIST 

Sunday School 9 15 a.m. 

Morning Worship 10:30 am 

835 Church Ave 539-8790 



FIRST LUTHERAN CHURCH 

Worship at 8:30 and 11 a.m. 

Sunday School — 9:45 a.m. 

(Collegiate Class) 

10th & Poyntz 537-8532 



STUDENTS WELCOME! 

COLLEGE HEIGHTS 
BAPTIST CHURCH 

9a.m. Sunday School 

10 a.m. Worship Service 

6 p.m. Training Union 

7 p.m. Worship Service 

Watch for New Fait Schedule 

2221 College Heights Rd 
537-7744 



Manhattan Mennonite Fellowship 

Sunday School 9:30 am. 

Worship 1045 a.m. 

KSU Sludent Group 6:30 pm 

Dorothy Nickel Fneson, Pasor 

1021 Oenison 539-4079 



First Ba p 



SG 



ist Church 



SUNDAY WORSHIP 11 am. 
CHURCH SCHOOL 9:45 >.m 

?l?t Hut rth M SM4MI 



Crestview Christian Church 

Worship 1030 am t 6:30 p.m. 
Coi'ogiaie Sunday School 9:30 

4301 Tutlle CrtaK Blvd. 
(on Harr 2*. ectrai Den SIM P«*| 



KANSAS STATf COLLEGIAN. Friday, Augutt 31, 1MT 



IB 



(Conlimxd from p*gt U) 

ENTERTAINERS WANTED muSKleria, singers, ale 
■no audience lor good country and western and 

' gospel music »v*ry Friday and Saturday nigtit 776- 
5222 14 i!) 

FARMER S MARKET Fifth jut) HumPotdl Saturday 8 
■ m Id 1 d m. Mjilitiiti It ml ilow*ri i* Si 

SILK WEDDING and Horei arrangements Mult lo or- 
der bouquets corns* s tic Five years eipen 
enee 539-2947 <4 9l 

KSU WOMEN -Kappa Sigrra invites you lo Ml Invt 
m.oner Pulling Classic tonight from 7 p rn - 1 
• mill 1930 College Heighis Hoed Call $39-9033 
to obtain ndes and informal ion Coma lo this Ruin 
Party and you n see mat Kappa Sigi have mora 
lgn> (SI 



Learn to 

SKYDIVE 



ONE BEDROOM dupi*» apartment, slave r*frigera 
tor. an conditioner 1230 Available October Cat) 
53.7 1678 lo r acpotn imam (4-81 

AUTO-stOlllES FO* SALE M_ 



KSU 



with the 
Parachute Club. 



Come to our 

INFORMATION 

MEETING; 

watch videos 
and ask questions. 

Tues., Sept. 1, 7 p.m. 
Union Little Theatre 



1978 PONTIAC Firebird. T-top tour-speed. 14 000 
mi lai on reeu it t • ng n n * C at I 539- 4 t 34 e »e n i n g s 1 1 

31 

I98t OATSUN 2B0ZX turbo, limited edition. Mop. 
miner air. lull powar. stereo 5399131 <2-«J 

1978 DODGE Aspen wagon Air eprvdinoned power 
stearingrbreieas Low miteag* runs well (400 or 
bail oiler 339420? o- 5324842 (24) 

1949 CHEVROLET one-ton truck, good tires De 

pand able Include tioi it a « If* part t 7 ?6 9 748 early 

or lala I2-8I 
1981 VW Rabbit diesei air conditioned 5 speed e^ 

cedent condition U 900 Can 778 1505 (3-6) 
1 969 VW Bus (400 mechanics and body better men 

plica 308 N 15111 339-1966 (3-7) 
19/9 DAT SUN 280ZX Sspeed. an conditioned new 

paml Must sail 776 9188 evenings (3 -71 

1976 CHEVY Bluer Good condil ion- 400(4 BBL.au 
lomattc (ran imtaaien- power oradas -power 
steering -lour wheal drive lock out hubs Can 7 76 
07SS alter «pm (4 6) 

1979 DODGE Omm. air conditioned AMiFM siereo 
new transmission 1900 776 2499. asd lor Zinni |5 
91 

FOR SALE 1983 Ctievetle standard 12 395 1984 
Cnevelte standard »2,B95 Nice 1 537 4083 ad er 5 
p m (510) 

1978 OPEL, auto lout cylinder an A Mi fm cassette 
89 000 miles. 539-821 Seller 5pm (S-7| 



CHILD CARE 



07 



CHILD CARE-Teectiar has openings in Day Cara 
home near Nortnview school Nutritious meals. 
activities 539-0565 licensed <15l 

LIVE IN SITTER Single parent needs alter scnooti 
evening cara Boy 9. girt 8 Fie* rem utilities, 
meals Conveniences washer -dryer, microwave, 
cable. VCR Two blocks Irom campus Call Pal 
539-0437 12-61 



EBONY THEATRE wilt hold auditions lor Happy End 
log and Job Security Sunday Aug 30 at Nichols 
Hall Room 008 ai 4 30 p m (51 

WHERE CAN You tind a carved agate (isn't AI Kry 
italics. Thursday -Sunday. 10 30 a m -8 pm High 
way 24 East 5394360 I5I 



COMrUTEflS 



FOR ALL student computer needs IBM. AT&T Ep 
ton. Compaq hardware and soil wire Creative 
Computing Services 537 2824 tfi-91 



APARTMENTS FOR RENI-FURtiUHED 



01 



EMPLOYMENT 



TWO BEDROOM basement apart me ni lor ram Fully 
lumished 1250 Ranter pays waler and electric 
537-3224 (1-9) 

THREE BEDROOM utilities mostly paid No pals. 

weterbeds 5394068, Monday Wednesday Friday 

mornings, or (913) 494 2633 (141 
FREE RENT I mi monm ol yearly lease Tan or twelve 

month tease Available in August No pets 537 

6389 (21'1 
MCE TWO bedroom duple), get, air. carpeted, tree 

lor August Telephone 537 7334 (24) 
ONE-BEDROOM, nicely furnished basement span 

mam, one hall Nock lo campus Laundry and ea 

bie TV 1190 plus utilities Prater female upper 

claaa, non-smoker Call 539-1836 alter 5p m 13-51 

APARTMENTS' ROOMMATES 1 Runlets 1 We have 
what you need 1 Call Tele Find 128pm 539CALL 
14 81 

APARTMENTS fQR RENT- UNFURNISHED "pT 

FREE RENT leal month ol yearly tease Ten or twelve 
month teas* Available in Augual No pels 537 
8389 I2HI 



Rubes® 



DATA ENTRY Operator Student Assistant - Pre 
Admissions Linn Up to 20 hours per week Ihrough 
December Must be available m two or more hour 
time blocks Possible continued employment 
ihrough spring semester at reduced nours Re 
quires accuracy reliability familiarity with com- 
puters and office procedures Select ton criteria 
will include GPA. prior related computer eipen 
enc* and longevity Starling salary S3 35 per hour 
Applications available in Anderson Hall Rm 1 19. 
Closing dale Aug 26 EOE (151 

KANSAS CAREERS needs a student with e«cep 
lionet word processing and clerical skills lo wora 
altarnoons starting Sept i Dbasa 3 skills prater- 
red Submit application letter, resume and reler- 
encasbyAug 28to Kansas Careers Fairchiid Hall 
304 Kansas Stale University. Manhattan Kansas 
88508 Kansas State University is an Equal Oppor 
tunily Employ*' l'4l 

PART TIME WORK full lime pay 1 " Christmas Around 
The World needs atea demon si tators' Seasonal 
Your own hours No cash investment, collecting, 
or delivery Pati 1 238 5429. Adete 539-2930 or Terry 
537-3948 (1-101 

HAVE FUN and make money loo, with Avon 539- 
1938 i l-i) 



By Leigh Rubin 




LUNCHROOM PLAYGROUND Supervisors 1W 10 2 
hours par day nam to1 p m 13 87 per hour Ap 
ply lo US0 *383. 2031 Poyntz. Manhattan. KS 
68502 913 537-2400 EOE i2-8( 

GIRL FRIDAY, te-20 hours***** normally. 5-6 15 
p m mandatory, other hours your schedule Own 
transportation references Evening meal prepare 
lion, and soma child care Call alter 6:30 p m eve 
ninge weekends 778 5542 124) 

SCHOOL BUS Drivers beginning immediately 54 75 
per hour, must b* 21 years of age nave a good dnv 
mg record and complete a training program Bus 
driving experience" not required Hours 6-30 lo 
8 30 am and 2 40 lo 4:30 p m Job description 
available Apply lo USD (363. 2031 Poynlz Ave 
Manhattan Kansas66502 913-537-2400 EOE i2-8i 

UNIQUE WOMEN S store opening October in Man 
haltan Full-time manager needed retail aiperi 
enc* preferred Submit resumes to Bon 6. "a Cotle 
gian (2 5| 

PLAN NOW tor neit summer s employment' Enron 
in Community Educations Advanced Litesaving 
Class The class sians Monday. Aug 31 The class 
meets on Monday and Wednesday until Oct 19 
The class begins at 5 30 p m and ends at Mi p m 
at the K S U nataionum This course rs required 
lor the Water Salety Instructor Course For mora 
in formal ion call Community Education at 432 
5570 and lo register call 6324588 (3-5I 

RESEARCH SUBJECTS Needed US ciiuens aged 
30-60 are needed lor a comfort study on mattres 
ses during September and October $60 per par 
son Sign up ai Institute for Environ menial Re 
search canter back of Seal on Hall |5I 

NOW TAKING applications for bartenders wait 
resses. disc (ockeys and door person Apply >n per 
son Ask for Doug or Betty at the Dougout (341 

HARDEE S IN Aggievill* is taking applications lor 
delivery drivers Must have dependable car ano in 
su ranee Hours I lei ibis nights and weekends 13 
7| 

EDITORIAL ASSISTANTS- Part-time student assis 
I ants lo write, edit and produce manuals and other 
user documentation tor microcomputer software 
Solid command 0* spelling, grammar and clear 
writing skills m English essential Editing eipen 
ence and ability lo use electronic word process 
ing. especially WoidStar. desirable For applies 
lion lorm. call at the Computer Systems Ottice 
211 Umberger Hall (3-7) 

NANNIE TRAINING Long island New York long 
term pi acemen I so you c an I mi sh sc hoot nearby — 
S200Jw*ek plus roomipoard Sand resume U- 
feskiits insittui* 123 South Street Oyster Bay 
NY 11771 14 8) 

KSU STUDENT employees needed residence nan 
food centers. 13 35 pat hour The ras>d*nce nan 
food service centers are hiring student employees 
You may choose you' hours within the lime pen 
otts students are needed Work anywhere from 3 to 
20 n o u r s per week - you t c n oice " J on s si 1 1 1 e»ei I * 
ble in Food Production Service and Sanitation 
Noon hours particularly needed no night work 
(finished by 7 44 p m al me latest i. every otner 
weekend assigned and no holiday work aipecied 
Call Pat 8483 lOerby food cantan Mary. 8484 
iBoyd lood center) Sherry 6462 IKrsmer lood cen- 
ter! (5-9) 

WANTED PHOTOGRAPHER lor wedding September 
8.1987 Must contact before September 2 1987 
En pane need only 913 485 2235 i4-Bi 

NANNY WANTED tor child care and light house 
keeping after school two lo three days a week 
Hours vary Car required 532 -5533 or 537 2*1 Sal let 
6pm (441 

PROGRAMMER POSITIONS available the Kansas 
Cooperative En tension Service has openings lor 
several student compuler programmers Work 
schedules can be arranged around class times 
Applicants should be familiar with one ol the lot 
lowing languages Pascal C Coool. or Assembler 
For more intormaimn contact Marv Knapp or 
Shern Thompson. Compuler Systems Office. 
Room 211 umberger Phone 532-7019 Apphca 
tions are available trom the above individuals or in 
the Computer Science Oitice Applications will be 
accepted through Sept 10 1987 i4 131 

PAY DAY' Apply now tor student positions tali shifts 
all hours I Including ic* cre*m Mexican pirja 
cook, baker, waiter, waitress and moral Bring 10 
your tall class schedule today and hil out applies 
lion in K Stale Union food service of lie* We offer 
sludeni pay plan. |Ob variety and centrally local ed 
work place where you work with olhei students 
We require thai you must be honest, reliable and 
display a sense of urgency, mull be clean, neat 
and wear appropriate attire We prefer to hire work 
study students and students who ar* eligible to 
work 30 hours per week Food Handier s card a 
must (3 10) 

PART TiMrflatlMMRIriCelM tor loceVkaaaamkalt 
maintenance company 776 1460 i5i 

PYRAMID PIZZA needs delivery personnel Day and 
night positions open Apply <n parson (4 8) 

SUBSTITUTE RESIDENTIAL Advisor Big Lakes De 
velopmenlal Center is currently laktng apphca 
lions tor substitutes in the group home Responsi 
pie tor supervision, client programming and 
record main len ante 54 la-hou' Apply at Admmis 
Itatwe OK ice. I50O Hayes Drive, through Sept i 
1987 EOE i5l 

RENTWAY 

J01] AnJctum ,W and ->^ I IW'j 
Wc ut kkiLng lie pjn \ssnt !H" 

Hukiispiiy j plus, hit DA icutiwry 

Mult be ncjt in aptjrmnu; *nJ hiu* Id iwi'i fk'nptc 

Apply in p?r*>n i: hi(h \ L ^tv\ 



"I was orphaned as a cub and never learned to hunt 



Bloom County 



GRILL COOKS n**d*d days or svenmgs Apply m 
person Booby f s 3240 Kimbait across I rom Cico 
Park (14) 

NOW HIRING Part- lime evening and weekend grill 
cooks 10 20 hours/w**k Apply in person 111 
South 4lh TheChelCate 11 10) 

LOCAL AG Business needs part time laborers varia- 
ble hours Celt 778-9401 between 8am -4 p m . 
weekdays (54) 



GARAGE ANO YARD SALES 



II 



GARAGE AND Bake Sate Saturday. Aug 29 trom 8 
am to 1 o m al 2005 Hayes Drive MuttiTamily 
wiih lots ol everything Sponsored by Mothers 
Club ol Boy Seoul Troop 76 (44) 

MOVING SALE Couch chairs floorlamp end table, 
stereo cabinet dresser 0«d frame typewriter 
clothes dryer etc Call 776 0373 or 4324154 Aug 
28 31 Yard sale. Aug 29 at 2433 Hotobs (51 

LARGE YARD sale 430 Moro Saturday and Sunday 7 
am -2pm both days 161 

SORORITY FURNITURE Sat* Saturday Aug 29 8 
am -12pm 1852 Fairchiid solas chairs tables 
tamps, pictures, mirrors, misc Ram cancels (5) 

PORCH SALE at 61 1 Laramie ram or shine Saturday. 
Aug 29th Lots o good stui' til 

HOUSES ANO M08ILI HOMES FOR RENT » 

THREE BEDROOM, lumished wilt accommodate 
three students Two bathrooms TV room no pels, 
no children 5375 plus utilities one year leas* or 
10 month lease 5394608 III!) 

MULTI BEDROOM HOUSE, stove refrigerator cen- 
tral air. Iireplace laundry hookups garage Call 
537-8389 |1Hi 

ADULT COURT lor serious students One two 
three bedroom, very reasonable ouiel location 
near campus no pets 537 4389. (3-1*1 

ST FRANCIS house residence space available short 
block oil campus »135lmonth single room 
snared kitchen Call 537 0493 leave message 13 7) 

THREE BEOROOM unfurnished house close to 
campus fenced yard garage No pets Call 437 
1234 Trust Department Monday Friday 8 am 5 
p m |4II| 

FREE RENT for seating and painting Lake home 
University Park two twdroom furnished Will rent 
to I wo s t udents lo c cm plele interior f mi sh i ng Cai I 
286-0174 alter ?pm |5 9I 

HOUSES AND MOHU HOMES FOR SALE ~~JT 

ig75— 2 bedroom 14 r 70 mobile home al Walnut 
Grove Appliances central air New deck with awn 
mg chain link lanced yard storage shed carpets 
mew througnoull Wallpapered redecorated i 
month ago 494 2720 |i-5i 

1964 AMERICAN Mobile Home 14 . 60. two- 
bedroom central awheal located ai Colonial Car 
pens Lot 332 very clean book value 113.000 make 
otter' 482-3311 or 482 3523 It 5) 

KS PARENTSistudems Don i waste money renting 
Buy and recover your investment al re-sate or la* 
lime Beautiful one year old three bedroom two- 
bath mobile home Fully furnished, all appliances 
539 7 119 or 5374104 (15) 

1971 OLYMPIC mobiia home 12 • 65 two-bedroom. 
new not walar healer new doors Only 53700 
Phone 537 7715 or 7764496 1 44) 



MISCELLANEOUS MERCHANDISE 



IS 



FOR SALE -Super single waterpad plywood post 
construction heater »50 Call 778 751 1 a!ter6pm 
1 24i 

DRAFTING TABLE 31* * 42" wiih parallel bar porta 
ble Ids on desk top real nice' Rob 5324078 Ask 
mg S35 (2-5) 




USE DOOOD desk lor sal* Call 7765222 |4 I2| 

WHIRLPOOL WASHER and Maytag dryer Priced to 
sell. Call 778-9017 evenings (441 

FOUR TICKETS, each lor Cardinals -Braves weekend 
series 539-9412 |45| 

MUST SELL Large dorm sue refrigerator 5120 or 
bast ottei Can Karl at 539 0289 |A5| 



Maidenforrn 

Buy two 

Get one 

FREE 

Sale is now on at 

LTDZFICOVz?, 

1224 Moro Aggieville 
Open 7 days 

HP41CV WITH matn'slet pac and HP 18c business 
calculator Celt 539-2343 after S 30 p m ask tor 
Pal 14-6) 

FORSALE Alpine 7165 car stereo Yamaha YCR350 
car siereo Sony EM50 equalijer'ampi>tier Alpha 
sonic subwooter amplifier Al) excellent condition 
Ed 537 0792 1591 

Dollar 

a 

Bag 

outside sale. Inside 50% off all 
clothes and shoes, paperbacks 
5 for a dollar, albums 3 for a 
dollar. 15% off every thing else 
in the store. Friday & Saturday 
10-5. 

(rain cancels outside sale) 

Grandma's Trunk 
Thrift Shop 

431 S. 5th 
539-9645 

WINDSURF O BRIEN sensation Etcailant begin 
ners board Ml good condition Can 537 3759 |5 7i 

USED 0ORM SI2E 3 5 cubic fool relngerator Great 
condition J125 Call Lor. at 539 2994 15 10) 

18 GLENCOE i*i boat with 454 Chevy engine 539 

1945 |57) 
KING-SIZE lour poster waterbed complete 539- 

1945 lS7i 

Enjoy Our Weekly 
Buffet Specials 

11:30 a.m. -2 p.m. 
M— Texas Western BBQ 
T —Italian 
W-Oriental$y|95 

U —Mexican ■»♦ 



mm Juy ^ §tud$nl * 
Semester or Year 
Membership 

and receive 

5 FREE 
TANNING SESSIONS 

The Candlewood Center 

3236 Kimball 

776-1750 

otter expires Sept 1, 1987 



LIBRARY ASSISTANT Monday. Wednesday. Friday 
8-10 a m . some nights Apply In person Veten 
nsry Medical Library, lour in floor. Trotter Hall |5 

tot 

WORKERS NEEDED to do neavy manual labor, lull 
time (temporary i. or at least inree one hall days a 
am -I2p m or t-5 p m . not including Saturdays 
EOE Slueviite Nursery. 3U? miles wesl ol me Loop 
on Anderson Ayenue 539-26?! (5) 



By Berke Breathed 



I 



MejwwHiie at ne man. 
Mmm off ices of we 

mmiY coMPermve 

■mom mmm 



u 





mum -/ pvr 'CHKim 

5RNKISY OH MbL 'M 
M?rXffl55 5IX 

rw$ in t3 eve 

CfiTCHh 
WORt 

mm f> 





SANYO REFRIGERATOR 3 5 cubic leet, good shape 
170 or best oiler Call 7767537 after 5 30 p m (3 7| 

DORM BUNK BED lor sale Has carpeted ladder Bssi 
oiler Call 539-7465 alter 4 p m i3-Si 

TWO ROOM sue pieces carpel and pad. 520 each, 
you naut Complete darkroom equipment 539 
3923 13-51 



FREE 

Hors d'oeuvres 

10 p.m. -Midnight 

Monday-Thursday 



yT^c 



University^f^Club 

1 7th & Anderson, 539-7531 



' Crossword 



WOMEN OF KSU - You are invited to Triangle F rater 

nity s Annua* Beach Bash Aug 29 Water sluing. 

yotiayoalf 8BO Meet at 221 n Delaware al 2 P m 

Call 539-7439 lor info or nda (51 
ST ARDU5TERS— LOOKING lorward to another great 

year Hope Is see you al the House tonight tor the 

Putting Classic 151 
NATALIE AND Marc Are w* having tun yet? Laura (51 

BOB BSE Y— BEING your twin lor the pas I year has 
been great Nope our future is ideniicaily first rate 
Double Mint ISI 

AZD JMW— Us oatn a fantastic lirst. and I'm look- 
ing forward to a second FIJI ESW 151 



F — Cajun 

includes salad bar 
or call for carry-out 



,▼( 



University ^Club 

1 7th & Anderson, 539-7531 



MOTORCYCLES/BICYCLES FOR SALE 



16 



MtYATA RACING bike 58cm good condition sun 

tour component S3S0 Call 539 5625 i243l 
YAMAHA 0T400 Enduro Excellent condition 1450 

eitras 494-2756 i.2 6i 
v 964 HONDA 250 KLR Bought new in 1985 a >c el lent 

condition, tow mileage $700 or best otter 238 

2B02 13 5) 
1961 KAWASAKI KL2M street legal Enduro Good 

condition. 54 25 lirm Call Bill . 5399023 lean* m*s 

sage (3 5l 

CENTURION ACCORDO !i" *ery good shape one 
year otd. shimano components. 1 190 Call Jim 
539-0180 14 81 

1980 HONDA XL500 Enduro goodcondmon Encel 
lent town bike See n 161 4 Fairchiid 539-971 1 . eve 
mngs [5-6l 



MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS 



17 



AKAI REEL to reel tape player. S25 Call Jim 

0180 (4 8i 



539 



PERSONALS 



II 



PARTY WITH Sailors' it almost scans it aimust 
rhymes' Come lo me Sailing club pig roast and 
hare a fabulous nme 1 Meet girls I Meet guys 
Food. beer, pop and sails under Tuttta skies' Sept 
4, be there andior be square we don t care 1 Tickets 
on tats tn the Union. 16 ot call 537 2967 or 539 
5463 1 4-8) 

AGDPLEDGESWe think you re tops, so lei s pull out 
an the stops Aipna Gam is al The fun has iusi be 
gun Love the Actives I5i 

HAPPY 23rd birthday Lover lips I love you. Jenn iii 

SHE DU actives and DUs— Gel psyched lor our 
6 B bash loday starting al 3 p m i5i 



PEIS ANO PET SUPPLIES 



19 



FREE PUPPY Needs a good home Call 539-5881 (5 
61 



PROFESSIONAL SERVICES 



20 



PROMPT ABORTION and contraceptive services in 
Lwrrence 913641 5716 llltl 

PREGNANT? BIRTHRIGHT can nelp Free preg 
nancy test Conhdenliai Call 537 91 BO 103 S 
Fourth St 5uite25 iii» 



CENTALS 



21 



SUPPLIES PRINTER typewrite r Rental typemrriters 
available correcting and non-correcling Hun 
Business Machines 715 North 12th Aggieytile, 
5397931 (1111 



RESUMI/IYPtNC SERVICE 



21 



P.iPERS RESUMES cover letters iheses and dis- 
sertations entered stored and compieleo to your 
spec ill cations Letter quality printer Come see 
us Ross Secretarial Services 6t4 N i2thiacross 
Irom Kilesi 539-5147 n-5i 

ARE YOU prepared tor interviews' 7 Call Resume Ser- 
vice lor your resume data sheet or cover letiar 
needs 1211 Moro 537 7294 13-ftl 

EXPERIENCED TYPIST compuler disc storage. 
letter quality printer Ask torOormda 537-9205 (A- 
10) 



ROOMMATE WANTED 



23 



ROOM AND board lor mate will do laundry Call 494 

8249 |1 RJ 
ROOMMATElSi NEEDED to share live bedroom 

house ttOO lo 1150 a month plus utilities Russ 

Steve. 452 5814 leave message (2-5) 

WANTEO ROOMMATE to share two-bedroom apart 
men! 1165 pet month plus one-halt bills Call 776 
0124 <2-5i 

ROOMMATE WANTEO Own room, washer and dryer, 
close lo campus S135 Call 7767905 (35| 

OPENING FOR two people at 1230 Vattiet. directly 

across slreet from campus Ji35fmomn Inquire al 

location 13-71 i 
ONE OR i*o non smoking lemale to share farm 

house Prefer vei or animal science maiors Free 

stall and pasture lor hors* cow dog Beet eggs. 

firewood ski boat lumished 7761205 8-10 pm 

only (37 1 
NON SMOKING FEMALE lo share tunury home on 

Wesl side Si 95 plus utilities 537 0550 Ask for 

Oiane 776 5602atier^pm i35i 

TWENTY YEAR old athletic mala sophomore |ust 
transferred m from Butler Junior College and de 
sires lo share a Iwo bedroom apartment with on* 
male student Call 7760342 or 532 3298 or 776 
1611 (56i 

ROOMMATE WANTEO lo share house Jieovmonth. 
electricity and gas paid 537 4083 alter 5 p m (5-8) 

MALE ROOMMATE lo snare oM campus tour 
bedroom nouse it tOamonth plus one-fourth uiii 
Hies 7767521 IS t(l: 



SITUATION WANTED 



24 



FREE ROOM and board in eichange lor dayiime ba 

bysiltmg Female non-smoker prelerred Can 776 

1118 13-t ti 
WANTED BASS player lor local rocki dance band 

Good vocal range also preferred Can Michael or 

Dave at 537 1770 l3 7i 

MUSICIANS WANTED lo form country band Lead 
bass piano drums Musi be serious ano proles 
sional Call Garth at 776-6246 14 8) 



25 



SPOHTI Nfi /HECREAIiONAl EQUIPMENT 

YOU CAN naveyour own bqail by this weekend lor buy 
shares wrih fnendel' i5 loot b*|a ski boat 105 
horsepower Chrysler outboard tuny equipped 
ready lo go. 778-693** 13 51 

USED OUTDOOR sports equipment sele-20 local 
campers, backpackers, canoers. kayakers. bicy 
c lists climbers and skiers have compiled all then 
used equipment to sen trade and buy Everyone 
welcome this Saturday 7 30 a m until I pm 1 109 
Kearney SI 537-01S2 into |4 -ii 

GYMNASTS THEKSUGymnaaiicsCiubishavingan 
organisational mealing Monday Aug 31 m Union 
209 Gym nasi sot an ability levels are welcome (5 
61 



WELCOMES 



27 



WELCOME STUDENTS 1 Ftrsl Christian Church 115 
Courinouse Pi.«a Church School 9 45 am WOr 
ship 830 <ind It am Minislers Ben Duerteldt 
539 8665 Sue Amy«. ??6 0025 Transportation to 
church- 776-8790 after 9am |5l 

CHURCH OF the Nararene lOOO Fremont Sunday 
School 9 45 a m Morning Worship 10 50 a m . 
Evening Service 6pm Prayer Service. Wednes 
day. 7pm |5l 

ST LUKE S Lutheran Church iMissoun Synod) Sun 
set and North Delaware welcomes students to ser 
vices Saturday at 6 p m and Sunday at 8 and 10 45 
am Bible classes. 9 30 a m (5i 

WELCOME STUDENTS lo the Manhattan Mennomte 
Fellowship We meet at 9 30 am for Sunday 
School and 10 30 am tor worship at the Ecumen 
ical Christian Ministries building at 1021 Denison 
line white bunding with the Iwo red doorsi <5| 

MASSES AT Calhotic Sludeni Center, 71 1 Denison 
Sunday 9 30 am . 11 am and 5pm .Saturday eve 
ningatSpm Daily Mass at 4 30 p m Confessions 
daily before Mass and Saturday al 3 30 p m <5I 

COLLEGE HEIGHTS Baptist ChutcnSBC 2221 Col 
lege Heights Road Sunday School 9am and 10 
a m Sunday Worship. 8 15 and Ham Chutch 
Training. 6pm Sunday Evening Worship. 7pm 
Wednesday Evening Prayer Service. 7pm Phone 
537 7744 iii 



28 



OTHER 

ANYONE ELSE biking ihe MS ISO? i need a mi 
Yvatle 532 5902 1 3 5) 



By Eugene Sheffer 



Garfield 



By Jim Davis 



ACROSS 41 Defaces 
1 English 42 European 
sUlestnan peninsula 
William 45 Ejwt from 
5 Coffee cup, a bar 



DOWN 17 Red 

1 Chinese wax or I if.nl 



...AMP I WA6 WONPER.N& IF 
V0U V 60 OOt WITH ME TONIGHT? 



WOO 6AV VOO't? RATHER GO 
OOT WITH CAMEL SPITTLE? 



0OT WHAT IF MOOR BROTHER 
AlREAPV HA6 PLANS? THAT'S 
WHAT I SHOULP HAVE 5AIP.' 




Peanuts 



By Charles Srhutz 



aren't WE GONNA Pi AY 
TENNIS A6A1N T0PAV? 



H0V ONLY T00X OP 
THE SAME VE5TERPAY 





nft i'ti 
8 Pointed 

tools 
12 Reticule 
19— de 

France 

14 TV's 

" — Ctrl" 

15 Singer 
Home 

16 Hrigltt 
weather 

18 Port for 
-id Down? 

20 Teeter 

21 It pre 

<i -ill's bat 
or petal 

23 (Slave ttr 
cariyenter 

24 ParaMttl 
28 Sluggislt 

31 SpaniMt 
gold 

32 Igntirc 

34 Slender 
flitial 

35 ItoWllTS 

largt'l 

37 ilapanew 
cnttigil 

38 Sun l.tlk 



49 Enjoy the 
Itearh 

51 Irritate 

52 l ■ S 
holly 

53 I >awn 
goddess 

54 Touches 
gently 

55 Mother or 
the gods 

56 Defeat, 
at bridge 

57 Home of 
the Mela 

Solution ti 



2 Road that 
led to 
Rome? 

3 Salad fish 

4 Coronets 

5 Med iter 
ranean 
winds 

6 Eskimo 
knife 

7 Roman clan 

8 Sparta's 
rival 

9 American 
painter 

10 Turner of 
films 

1 1 Meat dish 



me: 27 mlns 




Saturday's anawer 



19 Yearn 
22 Antipathy 

24 Soak 

25 Swifts 
canton 

26 IVosh! 

27 British 
actress 
(1900-741) 

29 Harvest 
goddess 

30 Intel 
ligence 

33 River in 

Spain 
36 Region of 

Yngo 

slavia 
38 Takes 

over 
40 Creek 

42 Danube 
tributary 

43 DCs 
George 

44 Sweet, 
pulpy 
(hill 

46 lltblical 
boatman 

47 quote 

48 At tress 
ljuirhesler 

6* 2 SOttarden 
tool 




62 



C I) V 



CRYPTtM»JlilP 



X H I" A N II H C V M 



It C 



B E 



IM'IICAX IK'niiAPM, HV SPBMCV 



I 



N ti A E V 



ti E II V X I' I i " M I E 

Saturday's Cryptoqulp: AMRITIOI'S MOVIE A1HHT 
URCFr' INDY .tit) DRIVERS ft INTAINED VLYTS ( tF RACY 
DIAUHi 



It 



KAHM1 tTATl COLLMQIAH, Frtdey , Augur* M, 1M7 



2 toddlers die after being left in car 



By Tht Anoc.atod Pr—s 

HOMER CITY. Pa. — Two tod- 
dlers died after ihey were left locked 
in their parents' car with the win- 
dows nearly rolled up for more than 
five hours on a day when tempera- 
tures rose into the 80s. 

Now neighbors are angry at the 
children's parents, and a farmhouse 
owned by relatives where they were 
staying burned. 

"I just hope they get what they 



deserve. I'm just glad their house 
burned down so we can be rid of 
(them),** said a woman, one of sever- 
al neighbors who refused to give 
their names for fear of retaliation 
from friends of Lisa and John 
Shields. 

Police say the Shieldses probably 
went to sleep in the secluded farm- 
house after leaving their children in 
the car last Friday. 

More than five hours later, Lisa 
Shields found I -year-old Calvin 



dead and 2'/» -year-old Kristle gasp- 
ing for breath, according to neighbor 
George Marsh. The girl died 24 hours 
later at a hospital. 

Several hours after state police 
arrested the Shieldses on Saturday, 
the two-story frame house was 
ablaze. 

Some neighbors yelled "Let it 
burn!" when firefighters arrived, said 
Fire Chief Joe Iczzi. State Police Fire 
Marshal William Jakela is consider- 
ing arson, but he said an electrical 



malfunction also may be to blame. 

"Everyone is upset Nothing in 
this area has ever occurred like this," 
said Police Chief Mark Succheralli in 
this coal mining community of about 
2,200, about 45 miles east of 
Pittsburgh. 

Shields, 23, who is unemployed, 
and his wife, 1 9, arc charged with 
involuntary manslaughter and 
endangering the lives of children. 
They remained in the Indiana County 
Jail on Thursday in ticu of $50,000 



and SI 5,000 bond, respectively. No 
preliminary hearing has been set. 

Neighbors say a chilly morning 
may have led Lisa Shields to believe 
her children were safe when she 
allegedly left them in the car at about 
9 a.m. 

The Shieldses lived less than 10 
miles away in Indiana, Pa., but neigh- 
bors said they and other young peo- 
ple were frequently seen going to and 
from the house, which is owned by 
relatives. 



Another neighbor said however 
that Lisa Shields appeared to be tak- 
ing care of the children. 

But Lisa Shields" mother, Lor- 
raine Lutz. said she had reported her 
daughter and son-in-law's care of her 
grandchildren to Indiana County 
Children and Youth Services 
officials. 

Slate law requires county officials 
to uncover clear evidence of wrong- 
doing or neglect before taking action 
against parents. 



MINI MARTS' OWN SANDWICHES 
MADE FRESH DAILY 

MONEY ORDERS 

FEATURING FAST, FRIENDLY SERVICE 



tt02L*r*r»4 

Miin Si in Ogdan 

2700 AnoMon 

A10p*n24*Vt. 



LocMrtlw 

You, 

Corwenktnc* 

saw 



Th«fii»n*r 

Country SlOK. 

3 MiM East O" Hn«r 14 

Of»n«».m.TilM»-ro ,H% 



MINI 

CONVENIENCE 



A\A¥?T 



BUD-DAY TWO 



The Search for Caren Continues 

Caren Concern is still missing. 

Ms. Concern is wanted for failing to 

previously volunteer for the F0NE 

Crisis Center. 

The search has become urgent as 

training is tomorrow 

August 29 at 9 a,m. 

Please help Bud (pictured, left) 

by calling 532-6565 

if you know anyone who (its this description. 




PRIDETTE TRY0UTS 

Saturday, Aug. 29 
McCain 201 

Routine taught 9 a.m. 

Tryouts. 1 p.m. 

Call Jo Byrnes 532-5296 
or message 532-5150 



SUNDAY SUPPER 

Aug. 30 
5:30 p.m. 

PROGRAM 

"State Budget and Higher Education" 

by Don Hoyt 

(50c donations or free if needed) 

1021 Denison 

The building with the two red front doors 



Sponsored by 

' CUMENIGAL 

'MRISTIAN 

llNISTRIES 



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Bigger 



"This year's class is one of the 
biggest we've ever had 
here/ K-State football coach 
Stan Parrish said. See Page 6. 




Weather 



Mostly sunny and mild Monday. 
Highs 75 to 80. Mostly clear Monday 
night, lows in the mid 50s. Mostly 
sunny Tuesday, highs 80 to 85. 




C< 164 

Cot _._,- deliver 

a Lc ' " '/. , _ o iiop in Manhattan will 

be trw iirst of a five-day tour of the United States. See 
Page 3. 



Monday 

August 31, 1987 



Kansas State University 
Manhattan. Kansas 66506 

Volume 94, Number 6 



Kansas State 



Collegian 




Sun-lit spray 



Chad Abercrombie, senior in nutrition and exercise science, and Debra OUphant, 
graduate in architecture and interior design, take advantage of the warm weather 



Sun/Jim Dtetz 

to wash O lip ham's car Sunday afternoon at 12th Street and Bluemont Avenue. 
Today's warm temperatures are expected to continue through Tuesday. 



Student's 
body found 
in apartment 

By The Collegian Staff 

A K-Suie student was found dead in his 
apartment near Aggicvillc Friday morning. 

R iley County police au thori ties are i nvcsli- 
gaiing the death of Earl R. LaPcre, 32, as an 
unattended death, said Sgt. Calvin Weese of 
the Riley County Police Department. No foul 
play is suspected. 

According to the registrar's office, LaPerc 
was enrolled for the 1987 fall semester as a 
senior in accounting. 

Police responded at 1 0:30 a.m. to La Pore's 
residence at 103 1 Moro St. after a letter carri- 
er alerted them to a large accumulation of 
mail and a foul smell emanating from the 
apartment, Wecsc said. 

The body was partially decomposed, and 
LaPerc had probably been dead several days, 
Weese said. 

An autopsy has been ordered and a forens- 
ic specialist from Kansas City, Mo., has been 
called to investigate the cause of death, said 
Dr. Robert Cathcy, district coroner. 

Results from the autopsy should be avail- 
able this week, he said. 

LaPerc had fallen Aug. 20 during registra- 
tion, and people who came to his assistance 
said he was complaining about a knee injury 
he had suffered previously, said Cy Wains- 
colt, director of news and information for K- 
State. LaPcre had injured the knee in a motor- 
cycle accident in 1982. 

He seemed fatigued so others working at 

registration continued filling out his forms 

■ See DEATH, Page 1 1 



Postmasters honor man's selfless bout 



By Jackie Brazzle 
Collegian Reporter 

Like thousands all over the world, 
Donald Marrs fought the bailie 
against cancer. On July 16, his fight 
ended. 

Because of the importance of his 
individual effort in the fight against 
cancer and his desire to "reach just 
one person, touch just one life," 
Marrs, a letter carrier for the U.S. 
Postal Service, has been recognized 
by the Postmasters of Kansas. This 
group has set up the "Don Marrs 
Cancer Fund" at the Center for Basic 
Cancer Research at K-State. 



'Don Marrs Cancer Fund' established 



The fund, inspired by Marrs' 
2,200-mile walk across the United 
- States, supports cancer research and 
education programs at the Center, 
Terry Johnson, director of the divi- 
sion of biology, knew Marrs for three 
yean. 

"Don was remarkable. He was an 
inspiration to many people," Johnson 
said. 

"Don had a fantastic amount of 
selflessness. He was always con- 
cerned about others. He made people 
feel good about him and 



themselves." 

Marrs was diagnosed with cancer 
of the lymph system in May 1980. 

On June 28, 1981, Marrs learned 
22-year-old Canadian Terry Fox had 
died after running from the Atlantic 
Ocean to Thunder Bay, Ontario, in a 
run for cancer research. 

The news of Fox's death changed 
Marrs' life. 

Marrs decided to make his own 
contribution to cancer research by 
walking from Carlyle, III., to San 
Francisco in his "Marathon of 



Hope." He began his walk on July 25, 
1981, and finished in October. 

"If there is one lesson I learned 
from Terry Fox, it was that I needed 
to take the time to reach out and 
touch a few lives around me," Marrs 
said in a special edition of the Center 
for Basic Cancer Research's annual 
magazine. "And I saw in Terry how 
to use even our infirmities, the trials 
wc face, to touch others. 
"It doesn't have to be a walk across 
the country. We can do it with just a 
few minutes of our time, some small 



deed or just a few kind words, and we 
can have a life — changing effect on 
others," he said. 

Marrs passed through Kansas on 
his walk and became acquainted with 
Dave Mc Bride, the postmaster at 
Ottawa. 

"It is because of his (McBride's) 
effort and the effort of his fellow 
Kansas postmasters and my friends 
that my name is associated with a 
scholarship fund at Kansas Stale 
University." Marrs said later. 

Lee Marrs sees her husband as a 



very giving person who was always 
helping others. 

She said her husband's illness nev- 
er seemed to worry him and he was 
never bitter or angry about it. 

"Instead of "why me?' he always 
said, 'why not me?*" Lee said. 

She said she believes the fund set 
up at K-State will serve as a living 
legend for their sons. 

Also, Lee said she hopes to start a 
21 -mile walk in each city of the 
country that has a cancer center. 

In May, Marrs led people from the 
Division of Biology and Manhattan 
in a walk from Ackcrt Hall to the new 
Manhattan Town Centre Mall. 



Road options perplex legislators 



By The Associated Pres» 

Finding a highway plan will be 
easy when the Legislature convenes 
today. Finding votes for one won't 
be. 

Gov. Mike Hayden has presented 
his comprehensive plan, and House 
and Senate committees have deve- 
loped their own. Senate President 
Robert Talkington, R-Iola, and sev- 
eral other lawmakers and groups also 
have proposed plans. 

Legislators* predictions on what 
will be enacted vary. Most are reaso- 
nably sure it won't be the governor's 
SI. 7 1 billion plan, but they say it 
probably will contain some money 
for new construction. 

Analysis 

"It's difficult to count votes with 
so many opuons." said House Major- 
ity Leader Joe Knopp, R - Manhattan. 
"You'll find somebody who'll say, 
'I'm for plan A without part B.'" 

Lawmakers have Hayden 's plan 
and one advanced by his Highway 
Task Force. Besides Talkington's 
proposal. Sens. Gus Bogina, R- 
Lenexa, and Wint Winter Jr., R- 
Lawrence, have suggested modifica- 
tions of Haydcn's plan. 

Also, eight Democratic lawmak- 



ers from northeast Kansas have put 
forth a plan that includes financing 
for highways, education and Wash- 
burn University of Topeka. The 
Lenexa Chamber of Commerce also 
has a proposal. In all, nine plans are 
down on paper. 

"I think it's quite obvious that it's 
going to be difficult to reach a con- 
sensus when there are so many diffe- 
rent opinions," said House Speaker 
Jim Braden, R-Clay Center. 

The plans begin with the state 
Department of Transportation's cur- 
rent programs. If the Legislature did 
not increase taxes or fees, KDOT 
would receive about $2.85 billion 
over the next nine years, the lifespan 
of most of the proposed programs. 

Current revenues would pay for 
SI. 025 billion in already-planned 
major modifications of existing 
roads and for all but $348 million of 
the agency's routine maintenance 
and normal operations. All plans 
would finance the shortfall. 

The plans all also increase 
K DOT's budget for maintenance, 
adding between $133 million and 
$158 million over the nine years. 

Thai's where the similarities end. 

All proposals include increases in 
the state's gasoline and diescl fuels 
taxes, but the sizes vary, from three 
cents in the House Transportation 



Committee's plan, to six cents in 
Talkington's proposal. 

All also would increase vehicle 
registration fees, but formulas differ 
and amounts raised vary between 
$117 million, in the Lenexa Cham- 
ber's plan, to $350 million in Talk- 
ington's plan. 

The plans also have differing 
amounts of money for new 
construction. 

The House Transportation Com- 
mittee's plan would finance $864 
million in new construction, but only 
if voters approve a proposed consti- 
tutional amendment for a half-cent 
increase in the slate's 4 percent sales 
tax in the August 1988 primary elec- 
tion. The eight Democrats' plan 
would finance $80 million in new 
construction, for local traffic decon- 
gestion programs only. 

Otherwise, the size of the con- 
struction initiatives vary from $300 
million, in the Lenexa Chamber's 
plan, to $1.71 billion in Haydcn's 
proposal. The Senate Transportation 
and Utilities Committee suggested 
$1.18 billion in new construction. 
"I think you're going to sec cither 
a very meager program with little or 
no new construction or a larger prog- 
ram than one suggested by the com 
mittee," said Sen. Bill Morris, R 
Wichita, chairman of the Senate 



panel. 

The plans also differ in how the 
programs would be financed. 

Hayden 's plan and the task force's 
plan rely on a five-cent increase in 
motor fuels taxes and increases in 
vehicle registration fees, with index- 
ing, or annual ajustments for infla- 
tion, for both. The state also would 
issue more than $1 billion in bonds 
under both of those plans. 

Talkington's proposal relics on a 
six-cent gasoline tax increase and fee 
increases, but the taxes and fees 
would not be indexed, and the state 
would not issue bonds. Talkington 
noted both the House and Senate 
committees rejected both. 

The Senate and House committees 
endorsed a half-percent sales tax 
increase in some form, but Braden 
and Talkington said they don't think 
a sales tax increase has enough sup- 
port to pass either chamber. 

The eight Democrats call their 
proposal the "no tax" plan, but it 
would finance a program from a 
windfall in income tax revenues the 
stale is expected lo receive because 
of federal tax reform in 1986. It also 
would contain money to bring Wash- 
bum University into the stale Board 
of Regents system and $160 in addi- 
tional aid lo local school districts. 
■ See HIGHWAY. Page 8 



Man opens fire 
on Bostonians; 
6 die, 2 injured 



By The Associated Press 

BOSTON — A man opened 
fire with an automatic weapon in a 
Boston neighborhood Sunday, 
killing four relatives and another 
woman and critically wounding 
two other relatives before taking 
his own life, authorities said. 

A Vietnamese interpreter 
called lo the scene by police said 
ihe gunman was a Vietnamese 
refugee involved in a dispute with 
family members over money, but 
police said they had no informa- 
tion about a possible motive. 

The 23-year-old man shot four 
people outside a home in the 
city's Dorchester section before 
running into the dwelling, witnes- 
ses and police said. He shot three 
people inside the house before 
committing suicide alter a two- 
hour standoff with police, said 
Deputy Police Superintendent 
Robert O'Toole. 



The sniper's identity was not 
immediately released and those of 
the victims were being withheld. 

But police spokeswoman Jane 
Sheehan said the gunman killed 
his 52-year-old uncle, 48-year-old 
aunt, two female cousins, age 23 
and 26, and a 24 -year-old woman 
visiting the family. 

During the standoff, police 
gave conflicting reports about the 
victims and their relations to each 
other. But Sheehan said another 
cousin of the gunman who was 
not injured in the shooting identi- 
fied the vie urns for police. 

She said police did not know 
who owned the house or whether 
the gunman was living there with 
the relatives. 

"Bullets were flying around our 
heads," said paramedic Juli 
Nichols, who responded to the 
emergency call. 

The driver of a tow truck 
■ See SNIPER, Page 1 1 



•* 




KANSAS >T*Tt COUJOIAII, Monday, Aupt 31 , t WT 




32 die in murder- suicide pact 

YONGIN, Soulh Korea — A cult leader called "Benevolent 
Mother" and 31 disciples look drugs and strangled each other in a 
murder-suicide pact after police began probing charges she swindled 
$8.7 million, police said Sunday. 

Park Soon-ja, her three adult children and the 28 other followers 
apparcnUy swallowed poison or powerful drugs on Friday and let 
themselves be strangled with rope and cloth in the attic of the cult's 
factory, said police officials, who spoke on condition of anonymity. 

They said the last man left alive, factory manager Lee Kyung-soo, 
hanged himself. 

"It seems to be a murder-suicide case. It's really hard to believe," 
said one police officer. "This woman built an empire." 

Park's husband. Lee Ki-jung. found the bodies Saturday. Police 
said then there were 33 dead, but said Sunday there were 32. They 
did not explain the discrepancy. 

The pajama-clad bodies were piled atop each other, many with 
rope or cloth cords tied around their necks and tissue paper stuffed 
in mouths and nostrils. Nearby were five red candles, drug bottles 
and rubber gloves. 

The dead included 28 women and four men, with the youngest 
victim a 17 -year-old girl, police said. They said autopsies would be 
performed on some bodies. 

Soviets 'reach for the skies* 

MOSCOW — Homemade contraptions of scrap metal, sailcloth 
and wood sputtered across the rain-soaked grass of Tushino Airfield 
on Sunday as Soviet aviation huffs heeded official encouragement to 
reach for the skies. 

Thousands of air force officers, flight instructors, amateur desig- 
ners and the curious flecked to Tushino for the 1 1-day Moscow 
show, which ended Sunday. They carpeted the old airfield with 
motorized gliders, canvas biplanes, experimental rolorcraft and a 
four-wing flapper that only puffed smoke into the air. 

The scene at the national ultralight aircraft demonstration was 
reminiscent of America's barnstorming days. Its goal was sharing 
ideas on design, construction and material acquisition in a nation 
with no private aviation industry. 

In a country known for strict control of its airspace, the show also 
raised the question of how far aviation creativity can soar before 
hitting a headwind of official restrictions. 

Private aviation is forbidden in the Soviet Union except within 
small, restricted testing grounds where flying clubs arc based. 

Dole says retaliation justifiable 

WASHINGTON — Two senators seeking their parties' presiden- 
tial nominations said Sunday the United States would be justified in 
retaliating against Iran if it attacks U.S. warships or the vessels 
they are protecting. 

Senate Minority Leader Bob Dole, H Km. also said he 
understood Iraq's reasoning for resuming its attacks on Iran this 
weekend in the 614 -year-old Persian Gulf war. 

"I can understand the Iraqis." Dole said. "I also understand we're 
talking to the Iraqis, trying to get them to back off. But they see 
the Iranian oil being shipped out, a lot of money coming in, the 
Iranians buying more weapons." 

Dole, a likely candidaie for the GOP presidential nomination, and 
Sen. Albert Gore, D-Tenn., who has declared his presidential candi- 
dacy, were interviewed separately Sunday on CBS-TV's "Face The 
Nation" program. 

Dole said the United States would have to retaliate if there were 
an attack and Iran were identified as the attacker. 



Oscar-winner Lee Marvin dies 

TUCSON, Ariz. — Oscar-winning actor Lee Marvin, a gravel-voiced 
World War Q Marine who went on to star as the consummate tough guy 
in films like "The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance" and "The Dirty 
Dozen," has died at the age of 63. 

Marvin, who also played an unwanted role in a historic "palimony" 
suit, died of a heart attack Saturday at Tucson Medical Center. 

His third wife and childhood sweetheart, Pamela Feclcy, was at his 
bedside when he died, said hospital spokesman Tom Rcavis. Marvin had 
been hospitalized since Aug. 1 3 with a run-down condition related to the 
llu 

His best-known tough-guy roles were in such films as "The Dirty 
Dozen," "The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance." "The Big Red One," 
"Donovan's Reef," and "Prime Cut." His television series "M Squad" 
ran for three years beginning in 1958. 

He won an Academy Award for his dual role as a drunken gunfighter 
and his evil twin in "Cat Ballou," the 1965 western parody which also 
starred Jane Fonda. 

"There is going to be a very small, private funeral in Tucson," his 
publicist, Paul Wasserman, said Sunday in Los Angeles. 

A public memorial service will be held in Hollywood within two 
weeks, he said. 

Demolition derby turns fatal 

WICHITA — A 16-year-old boy racing in a demolition derby died 
from bums after his car collided with another vehicle and burst into 
flames as his parents watched from the stands, officials said 

Gerald Debbrcchl of Wichita was competing at 81 Speedway Satur- 
day night when fire spread from beneath his station wagon after a colli- 
sion and quickly engulfed the car, said track owner C. Ray Hall. 

Four track employees rushed to the fire with hand-held extinguishers 
but were thrown back when the gas tank exploded. Hall said. None of 
the workers was injured. 

The fire burned for a couple of minutes before a fire truck stationed at 
the track could extinguish it. Hall said. 

"The car just backed into another car and it looked like the gas tank 
ruptured," said Lonnic Smith, one of seven other drivers in the race. "It 
just exploded into a ball of flame." 

An ambulance was called at 10:49 pm, and the victim was pro- 
nounced dead at St. Francis Regional Medical Center at 1 1:27 p.m.. offi- 
cials said 

Hall said the boy's parents were in the stands when the accident 
occurred. 

Hall said it was the second fatality in the track's history. A race car 
driver also died in an accident in 1975. 



Pet crow reunited with family 

PONTIAC, Mich. — A pet named Coal is hack home, sleeping with 
the kittens and eating hot dogs, hamburger, cat food and dog food. 

"If s a member of the family," said Mary Lecher, whose daughter, 
Mary Lewis of Davison, owned the crow. "It's tame, real tame. It's a 
very friendly crow," 

The big, Mack bird apparently tried to follow the Lewises when they 
drove to Lecher's home. But Coal took a wrong turn and adopted a 
Waierford Township family. 

The Lewises learned of Coal's whereabouts from a newspaper ankle 
about a crow that landed on the heads of some youngsters, and they 
were reunited Friday. 

"It sure was happy to sec the kittens again ... it was raised with kit- 
tens. It sleeps with them and plays with them and eats with them," 
Lecher said. 



Campus Bulletin 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

LAW SCHOOL INFORMATION MEET 

INC will be held loday inJ tomorrow from 
2:45 in 4:4 j p.m. in Union 204. All seniors md 
graduates who plin to attend law school 
should mend thi« meeting. 

REGISTRATION FOR LAW SCHOOL all 

who plan lo take the September 4 mock Law 
School Admission Ten need lo register Today 
from S a.m. to 4:45 pm tn the Dean's Office 
in Eisenhower. 

SOCCER CLUB TRV-OUTS will be held 
today through Thursday from 5:30 lo 7:30 
pm at the Old Stadium, 

CAREER PLANNING & PLACEMENT 

will conduct placement orientation meetings 
Tuesday for seniors in business *( 3:30 p.m. in 
Forum Half Computer science and informa- 
lion systems meet at 3:30 p. m. in Eisenhower 
15. 



TODAV 

SOCIAL WORK ORGANIZATION meets 

it 5:30 in the City Park Shelter. 

GYMNASTICS CLUB meeu at 7 pm in 
Union 209. 

BUSINESS COUNCIL meets at Kite's Bar 

and Grille at 4 pm. 

CAMPUS GIRL SCOUTS meet at 7 pm in 
Union 202. 

CHIMES meeu at 9 pm. in Union 208 

ALPHA PHI OMEGA meets ai 7 pm in 
Union 204. 

BETA ALPHA PS1 meets at 7 p.m. in Union 
Big Light Room. Pledget meet at 6:30 p.m. 

COLLEGE OF HUMAN ECOLOGY 

COUNCIL meets *t 5:15 p.m. in Justin 254 




STATE 
KICK OFF 



1 



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September 3 

300 Dlock 
Poynfz Avenue 

DOWNTOWN 



600 pm 

DAME QUE 

FREE WATERMELON FEED 

7 00 pm 

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* WITH NU WEIGH YOU SHED INCHES AND LOSE UNSIGHTLY 












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07920 


0*950 


100*0 


10*90 


11*20 


14020 


I4T0 


17710 


2023O 


22*10 


24999 


2619* 


192*0 


3120 


9 33320 


3*210 


JO**0 


0139O 


O5220 


07*90 


090*0 


10070 


10600 


11**0 


14030 


1*71 


3 117*0 


20260 


22900 


2*000 


262O0 


292*0 


31244 


9 33370 


3*250 


90*50 


013*0 


09230 


07*60 


09130 


100*0 


10*10 


11*90 


1*040 


1*11 


« 11*10 


20920 


21060 


2*130 


2*2*0 


29210 


3129) 


9 33*20 


34370 


00*30 


031TO 


092*0 


01590 


09290 


10090 


10*20 


11910 


1*070 


141* 


1*910 


20910 


23070 


2*140 


2*271 


292*0 


3126 


9 33**0 


3*310 


00* so 


013*0 


09260 


07620 


09100 


101 00 


10*30 


11930 


1*0*0 


1479 


1*9*0 


205*0 


23080 


2*190 


2*310 


29290 


3121 


9 33*90 


3*7*0 


00*63 


01390 


09399 


076 30 


09310 


10110 


10720 


11950 


1*090 


1*78 


9 1*970 


20990 


21140 


2*110 


2*340 


2911* 


1126 


9 33460 


36900 


006*0 


03*00 


03*20 


0764O 


09120 


10120 


10730 


119*0 


1*190 


1*79 


19000 


20**1 


23230 


2*1*0 


26360 


24310 


31321 


9 33**0 


1*610 


OOtM 


03**0 


05*30 


07**0 


09130 


10130 


10140 


116*0 


1*210 


1*87 


19030 


20910 


23250 


2*2 10 


2*370 


29340 


31331 


) 33790 


3*620 


01150 


01*10 


09*60 


07*70 


093*0 


10140 


10190 


11*40 


142*0 


14*9 


9 190*0 


20*00 


23330 


25220 


263*0 


291*0 


3144 


9 33740 


1*8*0 


Oil SO 


03*80 


09*10 


076*0 


093*0 


10130 


10770 


11690 


1*270 


1*91 


190*0 


20610 


21*10 


2*210 


2*390 


293*0 


3145 


9 33*10 


34 950 


311*0 


03*90 


05900 


07700 


093*0 


101*0 


107*0 


11**0 


1*260 


1*42 


19070 


20*20 


216*0 


2*2*0 


2*4*0 


29362 


1170 


9 33850 


3*8*0 


SUM 


01500 


09910 


077 10 


09370 


10170 


10190 


11*10 


1*290 


1*99 


19060 


206*0 


21«*1 


2*210 


2*900 


29400 


31691 


: 13**0 


34*70 


01330 


01510 


035*0 


07720 


09380 


10160 


10*00 


11930 


16300 


1*9* 


190*1 


20*10 


23*6 2 


2*130 


269*1 


29*20 


3t*6 


3 14020 


3*871 


01140 


03912 


05570 


07710 


09400 


101*1 


10610 


119*0 


1*310 


1*97 


19090 


20160 


21800 


25330 


2660 C 


29*50 


31671 


9 34050 


1.4880 


CI* J I 


03913 


05990 


07790 


09450 


101*2 


10620 


11950 


1*320 


1301 


19101 


20*00 


23*30 


2*400 


26*80 


293*0 


316* 


9 34120 


3*690 


01**0 


01314 


09*10 


07*00 


09400 


10220 


10830 


119*0 


14340 


1903 


19130 


20*20 


23*60 


2*910 


2*700 


299*0 


31691 


9 1*210 


36900 


01*30 


03915 


05690 


07*10 


09490 


10230 


10640 


11990 


1*330 


1506 


191*1 


20*30 


238*0 


29120 


26710 


2*510 


3190 


9 34220 


16910 


01**0 


03916 


05700 


076 20 


09520 


102*0 


106*0 


12040 


1*3*0 


1509 


19190 


20610 


23690 


29130 


2*720 


29*50 


31961 


9 3*230 


3*920 


01TT0 


01930 


06.200 


076 40 


09530 


102*0 


i o**o 


123*0 


14370 


1512 


19210 


2 0690 


21920 


2*1*0 


2*190 


29410 


31*71 


9 3*240 


14930 


01190 


039*0 


0*210 


0765O 


099*0 


10260 


10870 


121*0 


1*3*0 


1513 


19210 


20990 


23930 


231*0 


2*110 


29*10 


32091 


9 3*2*0 


349*0 


01*90 


03530 


042*0 


018*0 


09*10 


102)0 


10690 


12770 


1*390 


1313 


1 19310 


210*0 


21410 


251*0 


2**00 


29100 


32 1U 


) 342*0 


34930 


0t9$0 


019*0 


04370 


01810 


09670 


10271 


10900 


12*00 


1*400 


1313 


2 19130 


21100 


219*0 


2*170 


26*10 


29710 


32141 


9 3*330 


14940 


01990 


03970 


0**00 


018*0 


097*3 


I 02 90 


10910 


12*10 


1**10 


1913 


3 19390 


21220 


23990 


2*1*0 


26940 


29740 


32184 


3 343*0 


37010 


02000 


015*0 


06*10 


07910 


09141 


103 10 


10930 


121*0 


1*420 


191* 


193*0 


21290 


24000 


2*190 


266T0 


2*790 


32231 


3 34370 


37040 


0202 C 


03*10 


06*30 


07920 


09790 


10330 


10940 


12*70 


1**30 


1919 


19*00 


21100 


240*0 


259 00 


26910 


29770 


32 2*1 


) 344*0 


37230 


Mtta 


03*20 


06*60 


079*0 


09*00 


103*0 


109*0 


12**0 


144*0 


1916 


19420 


21320 


240*0 


2**10 


26920 


2*190 


3233< 


3 34430 


17390 


02110 


01*30 


0**10 


079*0 


09*10 


103*0 


109*0 


12970 


14430 


1529 


19430 


21*20 


2*010 


2**20 


2*9*0 


29*00 


329*1 


3 34*40 


37*00 


02230 


03**0 


06**0 


07970 


09620 


103*0 


10910 


12960 


1*4*0 


1*30 


194*0 


21*40 


24080